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XML is the markup language (Extensible Markup Language) and gz (short for GZip) is the compression format in this case. All sitemaps must be in xml format like sitemap.xml or in a compressed xml format like sitemap.xml.gz. Also your sitemap's url should be the very first line in your robots.txt file and it should read: Sitemap: ...


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Most crawlers tend to ignore the lastmod tag as many webmasters do a poor job of keeping it up-to-date and forget to update it when they update content on the site. A sitemap is still important to identify content on the site but even if the lastmod tag shows the content hasn't been updated since the last crawl the crawler will still crawl it to confirm the ...


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You can easily achieve this using the same doc_root without needing to worry about uploading the sitemap to the S3 bucket. Using the following rewrite code RewriteEngine On RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} ^(domain1\.com)$ RewriteRule ^sitemap\.xml$ /domain1-sitemap.xml [L] RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} ^(domain2\.com)$ RewriteRule ^sitemap\.xml$ /domain2-sitemap.xml ...


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I simply compressed them using gzip: gzip sitemap1.xml My server nginx is enabled to send compressed files. It looks like you're trying to send a double-compressed file and a compressed file. When you gzip a file and host it on a server that is set up to compress and send files, then you basically compressed the same file twice and when one ...


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If you try to download your own sitemap files, e.g. example.xml.gz, most web browsers will correctly prompt you to download the compressed sitemap file. However, if your webserver is not sending correct MIME headers for .gz files, some browsers may instead try open the sitemap file. This will fail as the internet browser has not correctly recognized the ...



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