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The short answer is that it depends on how you chose to protect your privacy. Terms vary by Registrar and by extension. For example, .je domains never reveal anything more than the Registrant's name regardless of the seller's policy - it is a decision made by the Registry managing the extension. The TL;DR is "Choose the TLD and Registrar wisely". If you ...


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How your blog is built on the page makes no difference when it comes to SEO. The fact that it says blogg doesn't even make a real difference in SEO. The whole point of having a blog on your site is to improve SEO through linking, fresh content, and keywords. An average site may have no need to change most of its content over time which makes the site go ...


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Based in previous experience, you will be totally fine using a Blog category instead of the Posts Page. A number of years ago I created a posts-only website in WP, never had a problem with indexing and so on. As stated before, google cares about 2 things, Content and Recognition. If your content is great, it will get the recognition it deserves, sure you ...


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Google cares only about content (unique, correct headerts etc. ) and incoming links (from good sites with similar content) . Nothing more, nothing less :D


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Simple anwser is : Install some redirect plugin that use header 301 (for example https://wordpress.org/plugins/redirection/) and simply redirect non-existed links (get a list form google search console) to existing content. This will reduce 404 errors ,and you will not lose movement on site


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Google's algorithm's are smart enough to know when a site is using a sidebar to display repeated content and you will not suffer a duplicate content penalty for displaying event information there. As to whether or not the algorithm will rank you well, that's a question that we can't answer because indexing/ranking is the result of numerous variables.


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Does Google just put that "First -" itself? Nope. Otherwise where might that be coming from? There are several things you will need to check since this is WordPress. All of them are misconfigurations of one kind or another Check your plugins to see if you have an SEO helper such as All in One SEO, Platinum SEO or Yoast SEO. if you have one, ...


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Turns out, the WordPress install was indeed compromised. I did a diff of my existing install vs a new WordPress install, and diff reported new file: # diff -qr wordpress_installed/ wordpress_new/ Only in wordpress_installed/wp-includes: class-wp-init.php I also found wp-config.php had been edited to include this @include_once(ABSPATH . ...


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I'd recommend allowing only one of the archive ("overview") types to be indexed. They're all facet views of the same body of information, so a degree of duplication will occur and, inevitably, some will be more meaningful and useful as a user entry-point than others. I'd suggest allowing categories to be indexed, and noindex the tag, date, and author ...


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Replace files to default WP files, including wp-admin and wp-includes. Keep wp-config.php file. Try changing the theme or downloading a new theme zip folder and upload that folder to wp-content/themes delete old theme folder and replace it the new unzipped folder. Do an audit to all plugin, delete the ones you are not using anymore/outdated Delete any ...


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Given the default behavior of WordPress, what you describe almost has to be a misbehaving plugin or custom function in your functions.php file. What I would do is the following: Disable all plugins Switch to a basic theme, such as TwentyFifteen or TwentySixteen These two steps will give you the basic WordPress experience. Create a post/page and see if ...


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Obviously you can always have nested categories in WordPress (and most other CMSs) as well as child pages, child posts, grandchildren, etc. If done in a non-spammy fashion, there is no real advantage or disadvantage from the pure SEO perspective...the spiders don't particularly care so long as the links work and the content is indexable. The big worry is ...


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The short answer is yes. Adding the domain name and IP to your HOSTS file will resolve the domain, locally, to the IP you have entered. When you then visit that domain in your web browser, along with your request to the web server (at that IP address you entered), your browser will send the domain name you have requested. The shared web server will then use ...


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Yes - altering a HOSTS file locally to redirect a domain to an IP isn't the same as simply typing in that IP into the browser. The reason why is that in shared hosting, one IP address houses multiple domains. When you type in that IP address of "your" site (which is also the IP of other sites as well), the server can either a) Give an error b/c it doesn't ...



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