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It depends. If your site has very few visitors, then there may be no negative effect on SEO. If however your site is the like one of the most popular sites in the world with hundreds of visitors a minute accessing the site via the root domain (for example, by typing it in), then it may affect SEO because all accesses to the root still produce a page to the ...


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GoDaddy by default enables mod_deflate and globally sets the compression types on all packages purchased in the last few years. Only classic accounts require manual intervention. SOURCE Our Linux Web Hosting hosting accounts have mod_deflate enabled by default. This compresses all text type files requested from it. You can disable mod_deflate ...


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As long as the upgrade goes smoothly, things should be fine. WordPress is good about keeping your content between upgrades. I've occasionally seen plugins break during upgrades. This can have some negative consequences. One of my WordPress sites had a calendar plugin that I couldn't get working again after the upgrade. This caused all of its URLs to ...


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After 3 weeks of back and forth with the plugin owner, and trying many weird things, we eventually came across this plugin which lets you remove a slug from custom post type. The only reason this was an issue is because the KB sat in a subdirectory off our main domain which is not hosted on Wordpress. If our site needed much less functionality and we hosted ...


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Once you transfer all data and database , you can easily fire below query to change all URLS from old site to new : UPDATE wp_options SET option_value = replace(option_value, 'http://www.oldurl', 'http://www.newurl') WHERE option_name = 'home' OR option_name = 'siteurl'; UPDATE wp_posts SET guid = replace(guid, 'http://www.oldurl','http://www.newurl'); ...


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Yes, you can do this by using PHP include statement to call your header, sidebar and footer whenever you need to include them in a page using <?php include 'header.php';?> Note: In this case would be better to create files with the .phtml extension, so you can either put HTML or PHP code inside of it. <?php include'header.phtml';?> The ...


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This is not an issue generated by the theme, in order to add categories into you URL you'll need to to change your URL structure. In order to do this you'll need to navigate to: wp-admin => Settings => Permalink Where you'll find a section like this: By selecting the Custom Structure option you can modify your URL the way you want, for example: ...


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Is there any detrimental effect on SEO efforts in having two separate systems (one custom PHP, the other an installation of wordpress) to manage the blog vs the rest of the site? There is a little difference in the clean code. Google prefers websites with clean source code. So if you good at WP so use it. Firstly do clean code :) Are there any ...


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In my opinion - since I'm guessing you're not using the author name as a link to the authors posts, and you only want to use this for display purposes - you could just setup a Custom Field and use that as the Authors name for display purposes.


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WordPress has a lot of userful plugins and well yes some can hog resources while some only run when you want them too. You can install a plugin to change the username and then disable the plugin or simply remove it, most plugins that do SQL changes will not revert the settings back once your uninstall it. Method 1. Users > Your Profile Your ...


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I think you might want to go to a link like this: // Close to domain: http://www.example.com/article-name // Or, alternatively, add a 'prefix' (e.g.: /blog/article, or /products/article): http://www.example.com/articles/article-name This will improve the SEO power of the url, because it's a lot shorter, and the relevant part (article-name) is closer to ...


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I would consider removing "knowledge-base/category-name/" from your URL altogether. Those aren't helping SEO, they are only making your URLs longer, harder to remember, and harder to type. Keywords in the URL path are a very minor ranking factor now. Your article name is going to have plenty of keywords anyway. Without the category name in the URL, ...


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The right way to avoid SEO duplicates is to use a canonical URL for each page. So your article could show in as many categories as you'd want and the canonical URL would be set to the URL of the article itself. Here are Google results which might help you implement this: ...


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Google does not care which backend you use. If you keep exactly the same content, frontend (i.e., same HTML, CSS, JS etc.) and URLs, search engines wouldn’t even notice that you switched to a different system. While such a migration (without content/frontend/URL changes) would be ideal, it’s not necessary. The most important things are that you migrate all ...


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Look under Behavior > Site Content > All Pages


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If the site produces backlinks to you it is important to use the Google Disavow tool otherwise the algorithm will be working against you, regardless. https://www.google.com/webmasters/tools/disavow-links-main create a .txt file and add: domain:thedamnsitethatcloned.com then upload it to Google via Webmaster Tools. Here are exactly the steps that I ...


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(In addition to @John's answer.) Is there any way to tell Google not to index that site? Rather curious that whilst they appear to have cloned everything (including your XML sitemaps*1), they have not cloned your robots.txt file. In fact, the robots.txt on that site actively blocks crawling of everything! So there would not seem to be anything to do in ...


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They're simply loading your site via a server-side script. All you need to do is block their server's IP address via .htaccess. Simply open up your server's access logs, open the cloned page on their site, then view your log for the new entry and you'll have their IP address. It also wouldn't hurt to submit a DMCA request to Google as well but this will not ...



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