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10

Go to http://www.wikimatrix.org/search.php. Choose Markdown Support under Syntax Features from the list on the left. Click Search. I get 28 results.


10

There are several problems with this idea that almost guarantee your article will get deleted, and quickly. Wikipedia is not a software directory. It's most definitely not meant to be part of your, or anyone else's, SEO strategy. There's a baseline notability requirement for articles. Basically, "Does this thing matter? Is it important? etc." You don't say ...


5

If you're aggregating from other sources, it doesn't matter if you think the way it's combined is unique and a valuable user experience - it's still flying pretty close to duplicate content. I'd be more worried about that than linking out to Wikipedia. There's no way you would be tripping any SEO red flags by linking out to a source site like that. Citing ...


4

I have used moodle for a while, it is an open-source CMS that should provide all that you need.


4

The stuff in the right sidebar is called Knowledge Graph. In short, Google (and other search engines) are putting focus on "entities" (things: well known people, businesses, landmarks), facts, and relationships between them. Information shown in Knowledge Graph tends to be a blend of information from Wikipedia, Freebase, Google+ and some structured data ...


3

When you say "create a Wiki" it's not clear whether you mean create your own site using some wiki software, or creating a page on Wikipedia for your app. You will not be able to do the latter as Wikipedia pages require some basic level of notability, which you wouldn't have as a new app. Creating your own wiki for your app is a feasible idea as it could ...


3

Here is a place to start: http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/wordpress-wiki/ You would have the best chance of being able to feed the wiki updates, entries, etc into your date ordered blog posts.


2

MediaWiki has some extensions that do rating this including W4G rating bar. If you can't find a wiki that does it out of the box you could hack that extension and combine it with the built in privileges system to do what you want. Or you could give a bounty for someone to do it for you (though one link on that page doesn't work and the Facebook page is ...


2

I started to post this as a comment (not an answer), but it became too long. I don't have a specific recommendation, but I'm very interested in the answer. -- Based on my experience, true in-line editing (which is what you're describing) is notoriously difficult to implement correctly. What you see in most CMS's (and Wiki's) is pop-up editing (except ...


2

If you use a JavaScript-based LaTeX renderer then you can separate the concerns. There are a number of them out there; I've know one site which uses jsMath, and some of the StackExchange sites use MathJAX. You should be able to integrate these into whichever wiki you prefer in less time than it takes to write your database transformation script.


2

You may wish to consider a code snippet collection sharing service such as Smipple, Code Barrel, or CodePad Projects. They're designed for teams to share code/markup; some (e.g. Code Barrel) allow you to tag snippets, which may help your team organise them by UI element.


2

Pulp Pedia is someone else's website. And you can't just delete articles from other people's websites, no matter how much do you dislike them. After a little bit of investigation, I found out that the site automatically mirrors all pages of the English Wikipedia, in modified form (with added profanities and in ALL CAPS). For example, look at Pulp Pedia ...


2

You may be able to use Wordpress with Buddypress and a plugin like this courseware one.


1

This is most likely all about an extension. The question isn’t mentioning if you are using Semantic MediaWiki, are you? If yes, you will have to find ways to know the list of whatever that is (doi:# ???) and handle this.


1

Text from Wikipedia is can be used on your website if you comply with the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 under which the content is licensed. For the full list of requirements see the licence itself. The highlights are: You must link back to the Wikipedia article that is copied. You must list all authors. If you make modifications, ...


1

While researching to ask this question, I came across this bug report, which seems to describe the same problem (see the "Comments" section). So apparently this is indeed a bug in MoinMoin. Hopefully they'll fix it sometime soon...


1

After a quick google, it looks to be manually, and badly, copied, not a bot or anything clever. If it's running wikimedia, try emptying or deleting the page, with the caveat that that could cause trouble by highlighting your concern/interest. If you own the media content on the page (images, mostly), you could try a DMCA request. If you have lawyers, you ...


1

That is actually pretty difficult. All you can do is include links. Links can have certain protocols. For example when printing a http://www.whateverlink.com, your operating system is configured to open those with a web browser. When using ftp:// for example, it will try to open the link with a ftp client. You can try to use a protocol used for markdown ...


1

Follow up to Lèse majesté: if you are happy with Drupal, you can see also at Drupal Commons Alternatives (reasonable good) can be: Elgg (with handwork as a must) Dolphin (not a my game, from my POV) ImpressCMS (to some extent with selected modules-set and initial sociality in the core)


1

OpenAtrium (based on Drupal) does everything you want, and it shouldn't require any customization of httpd.conf. The only problem I've had with it is that it runs somewhat slow on shared hosting. But if you're not enabling a lot of extra modules you can probably get decent performance out of it depending on the resource usage of your shared server.


1

You can look into Joomla or Drupal, they are both great CMS with a lot of plugins and big communities ready to help. For the wiki part, you can add Mediawiki, which is the software used by wikipedia And bridge them : http://extensions.joomla.org/extensions/social-web/social-edition/wiki-integration Hope it helps


1

Any wiki that has logins, a database that can be encrypted, and runs on SSL should provide enough security for you. You will also need to take security measures as you would with any system - physical access to PCs and the server, making sure that you can trust your users etc. You can ask specific questions on http://security.stackexchange.com. Every wiki ...


1

Wikis are tools for groups and individuals to collaborate in content. If you simply want version control for your pages, Wordpress with a multi-language plugin is certainly a better choice. Nowadays Wordpress is a fully featured CMS, not just a blog engine. http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/tags/multilanguage It's far easier to configure than Mediawiki ...


1

I've used ScrewTurn wiki before now, very simple to set up and use - but it does need a Microsoft server to run on (Windows Server 2003 or Windows Server 2008). There is a sandbox on the ScrewTurn website to try out how it works - so you can try it before having to install it, and even if it isn't for you it may give you sone ideas of what you do want.


1

MediaWiki sites have all of their content in a relational database (RDBMS). The code for generating a site map basically just does SQL SELECT query to pull up the necessary information for every page. Probably doable in a single SQL query (that returns one row per page). The code for that is fairly simple, really. Any large site that uses a content ...



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