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14

I have experienced this myself. When searching for a client's preferred domain name (an unusual one, unlikely to be of interest to anyone else), the domain was available, then 10 minutes later, unavailable! I found an alternative domain, but had to wait the 2 years until the original domain' registration expired before I could claim it for my client. ...


7

If any of the WHOIS information is accurate, or any personal information is available on the domains in question (for instance, if their names are accurate in their email address), you could always do some old-fashioned sleuthing! Search and see if they have any accounts on: Twitter Facebook LinkedIn Etc. A Google search might also bring up things like ...


6

Google's "Information retrieval based on historical data" patent is about as close to authoritative (i.e. not anecdotal) data as you can get: [0101] Also, or alternatively, the age, or other information, regarding a name server associated with a domain may be used to predict the legitimacy of the domain. A "good" name server may have a mix of ...


6

The domain-related danger is that you'll get unwanted sales contacts from people who want to sell you domain registration or other domain/net-related services. It's also a way for your personal contact details to leak out into the world at large. Some people care about privacy, some don't. This usually depends a lot on your personality and the risk factors ...


5

The primary consequences are your contact information is publicly available which means registrars may try to solicit you to switch to them. A company was recently busted for sending mail suggesting that domain owners had to renew their domain and tried to get users to do it through their website which also transferred the domain to them (for a higher fee). ...


5

Most domain registries require whois information to be publicly available, at least where the domain name is used commercially. The exact rules will depend on the TLD of the domain, and possibly who it was registered with. Another option is to use on of the "private registration" services that will set themselves up as the owner/contact in whois, and will ...


5

whois.audns.net.au, the WHOIS server for .au domains, doesn't support the expiration date information. Even the public WHOIS hides this information.


5

There is no way around this. If you want to use godaddy as your registrar that's the price you have to pay for private registration. If you can get a domain name with private registration cheaper elsewhere, and cost is an issue to you then register your domain at the cheaper registrar. From this question asked previously about entering fake information ...


5

I went through a similar futile exercise a few years ago. Someone had the singular version of a plural domain name I actively use, and people were getting confused. The singular version website is poorly maintained, and email to any contact info I could locate for it was either bounced or ignored. Bottom line, you can't force someone to negotiate with you ...


5

You can find the contact email from the Whois in 3 ways. One is from Whois, and the seconds is from information, and the third is from DNS records. Just replace your domain in the following link and see, whois Website info dns records The screenshot of DNS record page is:


3

Yes it does appear so: https://support.logicboxes.com/kb/servlet/KBServlet/faq658.html http://www.icann.org/en/announcements/advisory-10may02.htm However just because someone doesn't reply doesn't mean that the contact information is wrong.


3

Sometimes there will be contact information on the page, other times you'll need to use the contact in the WHOIS information. This should still work even if it's been redirected through some privacy feature of the registrar. I've not used them, but I think escrow.com is supposed to be able to handle the process of transferring domains when the person ...


3

WHOIS service doesn't follow any standard. I know it very well because I'm the maintainer of the Ruby Whois library. The goal of the library is to provide a OOP way to parse and get Whois details for a domain name. Give the library a try. Unfortunately, there's no similar tool in PHP.


3

Domain Tools offer a whois history service for most of the top level domains at $29.95/month with a 10 domain lookup limit. Their records go back to the year 2000. I've never found another working whois history service (paid or free), and I've spent a while looking.


3

You should not use a registrar that charges extra for private registration. A domain owner shouldn't have have to pay off their registrar to keep their private info off of the internet. That's akin to extortion or blackmail ("pay this extra fee or we're going to give your billing address and contact info to strangers"). It costs the registrar nothing to ...


2

I did a whois search on bob.id.au and it seems like the id.au domain names don't show expiration in their whois records. This may be a cool way to do things and prevent spam. I would contact a registrar that handles these by phone to get more insight.


2

You could try http://www.whoisguard.com/ -- they say they offer whois privacy protection for 'existing domains' (i.e. without having to transfer them to a different registrar), which sounds like what you're after. If it were me, though, I'd just transfer the domain to someone who offers whois protection for free as part of the service (like namecheap), or ...


2

Go to http://whois.domaintools.com/ Search for the domain you're interested in. Click the 'Registration' tab and look for the 'ICANN Registrar': In this case, the domain is being sold through enom (who is ICANN accredited).


2

The dot PRO domain names have tighter rules compared to the likes of .com, .org, .net. currently and most likely indefinite you can not use private whois information on any PRO domain names from any Registrars. This is set by Afilias and makes sense because entities are validated by government certification which is periodically checked against whois data. I ...


2

The short answer is that Cloudflare is safe. Cloudflare is essentially nothing more than a content delivery network (CDN). The theory behind it is that they will cache copies of your website to their servers, which are spread across different locations. When a visitor visits your site the server that is closest to them is chosen and the connection has less ...


2

while no useful direct contact info was given, there was enough there for me to do some searching on the web and find some other ways to contact the guy. Firstly, since you were able to obtain the information by other means, the message from the Registrar's WHOIS lookup server would not be applicable. In fact, this message really only pertains to ...


1

The list of each authoritative WHOIS server is available in the IANA database. For example .edu .mil and so on.


1

Without WHOIS protection, not only people can view your personal data when inspecting your domain, they can GOOGLE your personal data by your name - and they can see not only your address but also all the domains you own. That is because some websites cache whois results as web pages e.g. http://whois.domaintools.com (I'm not sure that's even legal) But it ...


1

If you register a domain name without protection, a quick WHOIS search will yield your name, email, street address, and fax. With protection, it looks like this: Registrant Name:Whois Agent Registrant Organization:Whois Privacy Protection Service, Inc. Registrant Street1:PMB 368, 14150 NE 20th St - F1 Registrant Street2: Registrant Street3: Registrant ...


1

Here are some registrars to get your .CN domain http://www.marcaria.com/domains/China/china-domain-registration-cn.asp http://www.101domain.com/cn.htm


1

http://www.ionfish.org/whois/ (An example tool) uses the following method: http://fixee.org/paste/0rj1oj0/ The script comes from here: http://www.phpwhois.org


1

There's no way to find all domains purchased today or in the past because it doesn't exist a central database of all WHOIS records. The only way to (partially) accomplish this task is to keep a list of domains and check them. Of course, the larger is the list, the more accurate is the result of the query. Needless to say, this is a very expensive (in terms ...


1

I don't think that you're going to find that. If you don't want to pay DomainTools, you could try their free account. I have a free account at DomainTools but it only provides limited access to what you are looking for. An alternative is to try to back the information out from the Wayback Machine, but that isn't the easiest way to go. See the responses to ...


1

I don't know about your registrar, but I know that GoDaddy offers private registration. What happens is that it's the address of the company that handles your private registry. When correspondence is sent to you, it's sent to the company and they forward it to you (so only THEY know your info.) It works the same for email, too. So, for example, if a person ...



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