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7

You can host a website on a home system, if you like. There is a caveat, though. Some Internet Service Providers (ISPs) don't allow their customers to host their own servers, while others will allow you to do so. An ISP that doesn't allow home users to host their own servers may block traffic on the ports commonly used by servers. E.g., it can stop someone ...


3

Good News! Since 8.3 (Dec 2015) GitLab has "GitLab Pages". https://about.gitlab.com/2015/12/22/gitlab-8-3-released/ This feature is available on GitLab.com (which runs EE) where you can have free, unlimited repositories, public/private. Here is documentation for GitLab Pages, explaining how you can host for free your static websites on GitLab. ...


3

it seems to me, the archiving procedure lets the tarball grow and if the tarball becomes (together with all other data) bigger then the available place in your booked hosting, the server kills the process. You will be forced firstly to download all of your data, and archive them locally. Could it be true?


3

You can start out hosting it on your own computer. I started out hosting my first website on my own computer. Now I make my living from websites. But when you do so, be aware: Your home is going to have lousy uptime. Your site is going to go offline for a variety of reasons: snow storms, traffic accidents, neighbors hogging bandwidth, your ...


3

Yes you can host it on your own server. If you have a static IP, just up your network as if are a server and this should work. There is plenty to be found on the matter. You don't need a domainname. A domainname is for the common user, it's a whole lot easier to remember a name than an IP address. Just think of your contact list, it's easier to remember the ...


2

An better solution might be SCP (Server to server Copy) scp -pr usernameOldServer@servername.com:/home/location/to/document_root/* /home/location/to/place/files This page provides simple examples to do so. Or if you want to stick to tar: The other answers explain why it gets killed, so I'm skipping that You are running into problems because you either ...


2

http://www.example.com/~username/ The ~username part is a temporary URL just to open and view your website. It wont affect your website if you access it via the temporary URL. This give you the power to access the hosting files before your Domain DNS gets propagated (1 hour to 48 hours) across the globe. /public_html/example.co.nz This is peculiar but I ...


2

If the process is killed partway through, then you either ran out of memory or you ran out of disk space. I'm going to assume disk space. When compressing your entire disk data, assume you'll need the same amount of free disk space left as the total number of bytes all of your data is that is to be compressed. Your best bet if you want compression is to ...


2

For not having proper reputation to add a comment, here I try to give suggestion that perhaps suit to your problem. Try to change the chmod first into 755, then try to delete them again. That's all. :D


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There is a lot of discussion about wether the IP address can affect the page rank or not. For example here: https://pressable.com/blog/2013/02/21/do-you-need-a-dedicated-ip-address-for-seo/ and here https://wpengine.com/blog/the-myth-of-the-dedicated-ip-address-for-seo/ The short answer is yes it can affect your page rank


1

My question is, can I make a site and make it public world wide with following conditions: Instead of hosting website on hosting service provider like Amazon, host it on my own server. No matter bandwidth, no matter performance, no matter uptime. Yes. I don’t want domain name. No matter people access my site using my public ip e.g. ...


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Hostgator refers to the ~username URL as a "temporary URL." They suggest that you don't actually use it. Instead, you should put your domain name into your local computer's host file until it is live in DNS. Hostgator has a help page that explains this. It also offers migration solutions from the temporary URL for all their server configurations. ...


1

Subdomains in one account with cPanel is definitely possible. It's a feature that works quite well, actually. Multiple domains in one cPanel account isn't gonna work. If you would still prefer some central management, maybe you should consider access to WHM. Then again, this is all up to your hosting company. You should ask them.


1

I heard it's not possible to have separate cPanel passwords for the two domain[s] if I'm only paying for one hosting account. I assume you mean separate cPanel user logins with separate passwords. Unless your provider actively allows this, the answer is likely "No." Is it possible to have separate passwords for FTP and SSH? Regarding SSH, this ...


1

You can use one domain and then make it subdomain. Like stackexchange.com using webmasters.stackexchange.com and others.By using one domain only you make the subacategories.


1

It depends on the terms and conditions and type of hosting you use for the most part. If you use a dedicated server, then you'll be able to have an entire cpanel interface in your control to the point where you can assign a different username/password to each domain and have as many domains as you want attached to the server. If you use another hosting ...


1

The domain name is not yours and belongs to someone else. You have no control over what happens to it now. You can contact the site owner using the e-mail address found in the whois record, however, I warn you not to expect much. It sounds like this domain name is being monetized by a spammer. Spammers do not care what you think. It is all about cash. Your ...


1

I was in a trouble last few days since my web host was hacked for POST on PHP files. I've been dealing with files with .png extension that have PHP code inside. This is why error checking should be implemented in your upload script, that way, you can test the uploaded file to ensure the data is valid and if the data is not valid, then discard the file ...


1

I would recommend going with free blogging platforms such as wordpress and blogger. You dont have to worry about hosting nor domain. Also you will find tons of free themes to get your website up and running.


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you can group some data and gzip it in smaller chunks. divide whole data in 20 or 30 sections and use server side import rather than zipping it. You can prepare a script that list files and folder on old server and new server using curl library, import all. It would be much better ,faster and error free. keep log file for verification


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Since you're using GMail for email, only by making changes to the MX DNS records will email delivery be impacted. So leave the MX records "as is". You shouldn't have to change your name servers. Just register the necessary A records for your website and you'll be fine.


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www.site1.net. IN CNAME mainsite.com. You have setup site1.net as an alias of mainsite.com The DNS now overrides the virtual host and alters your records and redirect you to mainsite.com Just leaving this here as a reference.


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S3 isn't meant to be the ONLY tool from AWS for static website hosting. The recommended approach is to put CloudFront in front of the S3 instance so that CloudFront can handle caching. I believe this will also eliminate your issue with paying a bunch for an increase of traffic since CloudFront will use it's cache to serve the files and not hit S3. Of course, ...



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