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15

My VPS has given me the chance to experiment with new server software. I started on the usual apache2+mod_php setup, but now I have nginx+php-fpm with a proxy back to some legacy apache2+mod_php sites. I'm also running (and tuning) APC, memcached, and mysqld. If you're just going to run a few sites, and performance is good on your shared host, I would stay ...


12

danlefree's answer to this similar question is quite relevant here: http://webmasters.stackexchange.com/questions/2458/how-difficult-is-an-unmanaged-vps/2464#2464 Securing a server is more than just a one-off task. Initial one-off tasks include: Hardening SSHd (there are a number of tips and tutorials out there for this, this was the first good looking ...


8

I would strongly recommend against EC2 for your first foray into dedicated hosts. EC2 has very specific applications, and there's a much steeper learning curve involved. At this point, there are coarsely three directions to go, and pros and cons for each: Managed dedicated hosting: I've never shopped for managed hosting firsthand, although I've interacted ...


7

Optimise your application before optimising your server infrastructure It's tempting to throw more servers at traffic spikes or overpay for resources that you may never use "just in case". A better solution is to optimise your application to withstand spikes before they arrive. Specifically: Cache dynamic code Your application should serve static html files ...


7

I'm 100% positive (OK - 99.999999%) that there is no GUI running on your Ubuntu VPS -- no point to waste resources for something that never will be used -- everything can be managed via command line. If you want to use tools like TeamViewer/VNC server, you will have to install GUI first (KDE/Gnome/etc) which will eat extra RAM/CPU which you, most likely, ...


5

There are several steps to this process: Find your server IP's I'm assuming you have WHM here? Open http://IP/whm (or the path to your server control panel installation) then go to IP Functions >> show IP address usage & check your primary and secondary IP Address. Make a note of these two IP's Register your Nameservers You need to register your ...


5

The UnixBench script is a popular benchmarking tool, however, you should keep in mind that your results will vary depending upon what your neighbors are up to when you're using a VPS and your hosting provider will not appreciate it if you're running a benchmarking script regularly.


5

I don't know how widely used it is, but I can say it's a very good option if you don't mind the additional cost. Generally speaking, you get more space, better performance, the ability to install your own software. If you've only got a few photos on your personal blog, a shared plan is probably your best bet. But if you have GBs of photos and videos you ...


5

You might want to check out SliceHost or Linode. Neither though offers plans around what you are looking at ($10/mth). But then again I wouldn't pay less than $20/mth for a decent VPS. Less than that and you probably aren't getting the best service. Both have great tools available on their control panels, good customer service, good uptime and reasonable ...


5

I'll give my thoughts on VPS, as I have no experience in cloud. I was in the same boat as you in terms of having my shared hosting no longer being reliable in terms of performance. I had roughly 20 websites on the same account, but only a handful of ones that were more than basic html/css/javascript. I chose to get a cheap VPS(I pay $40/mo) and moved ...


5

In 000-default (usually in /etc/apache2/sites-enabled/000-default) You can use the VirtualHost tag to separate different sites. <VirtualHost *:80> DocumentRoot /var/www/example1 ServerName www1.example.com </VirtualHost> <VirtualHost *:80> DocumentRoot /var/www/example2 ServerName www2.example.com </VirtualHost>


5

It sounds like your domain records have not propagated yet. This means that the domain name servers around the world that store a record of your domain information haven't updated with the latest details, so they are still 'sending' visitors to your old server. The solution is to wait. It can take between 0 and 48 hours for domain name changes to update ...


4

Supplementing Steven's great post: "Managed" vs "Unmanaged" is one big distinction you'll find in hosting. You'll find hosting packages that look equivalent, but some will be much cheaper than the others. The cheaper packages are generally unmanaged. There's no support staff to help you upgrade PHP, tell you why your script stopped working, or tell you why ...


4

Don't spend £250/year. Spend as little as possible, then scale as you grow. Two options to consider: 1. Use a source code hosting service such as github Github is a popular hosting service for the git version control system. In addition to code hosting and online code browsing, the long list of features it offers includes team management, wikis, forums, ...


4

No you would not be foolish, or at least you would not be more foolish than many others. I work for a large hosting company and have seen there are many people with unmanaged VPS and dedicated severs running production sites for paying customers with far less knowledge than you. Often it's web design (or worse, marketing) companies who drift into hosting, ...


4

You can get lower prices for hardware out of prgmr.com. I have used one of their VPS plans for ~6 months now, and had almost zero problems. The trade-off is support. While their system very rarely gives me issues, I have had them. And they were my fault and I had to fix them on my own. There's generally somebody on the other end of the line if I send an ...


4

Try an hosting like 1and1. It's cheap, and supports the load well. They also have some easy to use VPS


4

The great thing about a linux VPS is they are pretty secure out of the box. My first recommendation though it to talk to your host and see if they will harden or optimize the security for you. Most VPS with a control panel (webmin, cpanel, etc) are "managed" and they will do a lot for you. Especially if you aren't quite sure what you are doing this is the ...


4

You can think of the major difference this way: With both, you are paying for root access, but you'll only get complete use of the hardware with a dedicated machine. VPSes can frequently fall victim to one of the huge problems in the hosting business: overselling. At any given moment during the day, the average customer isn't going to be using all of the ...


4

You have to be running Apache or another webserver on your VPS. Also you will need a DNS host for pointing the domain to the hosting, i recommend Cloudflare.com . You will also probably want MySQL and PHP installed. Alternatively you can create your own DNS server with bind using this tutorial: ...


4

One IP could be for your web (HTTP/HTTPS) traffic, another could be for FTP or SSH access, another could be for mail, &c. If the publicly known IP (i.e. the one published to DNS) is separate to the one used for administration (only known by you and your team) then that would be a way of securing your server - by allowing different types of traffic over ...


3

Apache, MySQL, and other common servers and background tasks (daemons) run under the 'nobody' user. From the Wikipedia entry for nobody: "In many Unix variants, "nobody" is the conventional name of a user account which owns no files, is in no privileged groups, and has no abilities except those which every other user has. It is common to ...


3

You could install a utility that counts bytes passing over the network interface, such as vnStat. Installation instructions for CentOS are here. Note that this won't help you check how much bandwidth you used before you installed it, so you won't be able to use it to contest the figure reported by your hosting company this time. You might consider that ...


3

Cron is only run "once" at specific time or "every" minutes/hours. It doesn't check the return code. But a wrapper script CAN check the output. I suggest that you launch a "wrapper" to your script, then, the script will check itself for the presence of a file "/tmp/runcomplete", check for the run counter in another file, well, you get the idea. From my ...


3

You may want to look at the info provided here : http://www.servletworld.com/tomcat/howto-change-tomcat-port.html (Essential content inserted here as that link is down in Feb 2013.) Look for the section in server.xml like this and change the port to 80. <connector port="8080" protocol="HTTP/1.1" connectiontimeout="20000" ...


3

Linking PHP as an Apache HTTPD module makes them inseparable. This is not without problems: Indeed, many PHP libraries aren't threadsafe, so it's essential to use the prefork-mpm module for HTTPD 2.x in production to implements a non-threaded, pre-forking web server that handles requests in a manner similar to HTTPD 1.3. But this approach strongly affects ...


3

You could use a stress-tester like this one: http://loadimpact.com/ which has a free option, but limits it to 50 users. Paid-for (or registered users) can get increased stress levels. I like this service specifically because it generates very useful graphs, and a detailed report containing page load errors, etc. There are many other services like this one, ...


3

Containers running on virtualised servers such as OpenVZ or Virtuosso have a shared kernel (and shared memory) with every VPS on that machine. This means that the container time will be the same as the host computer's time, and the only person who can control that is the server administrator. You should still be able to edit the timezone of the VPS, though, ...


3

I’ve checked it again, should work out of the box. In case it doesn’t: Try this thread: http://wordpress.org/support/topic/users-not-receiving-activation-email Try reinstalling Exim4 – “bash setup-debian.sh exim4” Try installing Postfix instead Exim. There is also a new version of lowendscript made by Xeoncross - ...


3

It could be done with a single SSL certificate. Specifically, what you want to do is to provide 'Subject Alt Names' in the certificate. Take a look at Google's certificate for example, which has the following Subject Alt Names. In other words, they have one certificate for all of those domains. DNS Name: *.google.com DNS Name: *.android.com DNS ...



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