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27

There's another factor at play with Quantcast undercounting: They use third-party cookies (cookies served from the .quantserve.com domain), whereas Google Analytics uses first-party cookies (stackexchange.com, etc.) This is pretty crucial, as some browsers (particularly Safari, but more recently Firefox and Chrome) disable third-party cookies as the default ...


14

Quantcast emailed me: You mentioned that there was a fairly substantial delta between your GA numbers and your QC numbers. While this doesn’t happen often, it does happen and there are several reasons this can occur. For instance, we account for 3rd party cookies and auto-refreshes and GA does not. We also ask that publishers to place our tag near the ...


10

Search engines have no way of knowing what traffic your website gets so it can't be used as a ranking metric in their algorithm. (Google has clearly stated that Google Analytics data is not used in their ranking algorithm). Even if they did, the number of visits would not be a good judge of relevance as it is easy to artificially inflate your number of ...


7

The ratio of cookies to unique visitors is usually between 1.3 and 1.7 for sites with over a million visits. While yc01 is correct that GA uses first-party cookies vs third-party cookies, we at RealSelf.com use two first-party analytics providers (GA and Comscore Direct) and GA still shows 30% more Absolute Unique Visitors than Comscore's Unique Visitors. ...


5

It's not a bad practice, you can buy all the visitors you want. Most companies that offer these services will run a program connecting to your website through proxies increasing your unique visitor count. Though the visits will be less than a minute with 100% bounce rate. It does nothing for your rankings and ruins your Analytics data. It's a waste of money ...


4

Here's a recent (May 4, 2011 -- yesterday when I write this) study from MediaMind with "Cookie Inflation Multipliers" for different markets: press release report (requires filling out a form and giving them your e-mail address) direct link to the report (because it's not unique for the e-mail address) write up by eMarketer Their calculated inflation ...


4

Providing initial explanation re difference between server-side stats and online stats for the benefit of other users: Apache access log analyses all the traffic to your server. StatCounter tracks all the visits to your site. Your server gets a lot more traffic than your site, because server traffic includes all the visits from robots, spambots, crawlers ...


4

Well, I don't know how to merge them into Google Analytics, but I can answer the first question. de or de_de are (obsiously) the same. They are Language tags. de is a Language subtag de-de is a Region subtag. A few examples of language tags: fr: French language, en-AU: English language, as written and spoken in Australia, az-Latn-IR, Azeri language, ...


4

Google can measure visitors if the website is a click through on their search engine and this is across the board with all the other search engines. Google has never directly confirmed that trends of clicks actually matters or not, through it would make logical sense that this would be true. So other than having direct access to your server there is no way ...


3

Based on my experience and my understanding of how javascript works, the Google Analytics code only records data related to the moment the user first loads the page and the javascript is run. So if a user only looks at one page, they would have a time on site of 00:00:00, regardless of how long they looked at a page. The GA code has no way of knowing when ...


3

Ultimately, Google Analytics does exactly the same thing, however, the image URL is created using Javascript. If you really, really wanted to use Google Analytics for your site, (albeit with limited functionality) you might take a look at Troubleshooting The Tracking Code to see how the image URL works - here's the bare minimum to push data to Google: ...


3

In that case the answer I gave to this question yesterday will redirect all the pages in one go (even though you're not using Tomcat). Search engines will notice the 301 and start indexing you at the new domain. Google will know you've moved too.


3

People agree to anonymously share their browsing habits with these companies in return for perks, such as toolbars and analytics packages. The companies use these habits and mine data from other sources (e.g. other companies like them) to build an estimate of traffic flow. From Alexa's about page: The traffic rank is based on three months of aggregated ...


3

Search Engine may know about visits to orphaned (i.e. no inbound links) websites based on users who may have a toolbar installed that is reporting browsing activity back to the search engine. Whether this is used as a ranking signal is debatable. Also if you use a tool such as Google Analytics then Google in this case will certainly know a great deal about ...


2

When looking at the definition of "unique events", it states that it is "The total number of unique events for the profile, across all categories." It is entirely possible that one visitor is triggering more than one event, especially if they are visiting multiple categories. Also, when you compare "visitors" with "visits", you should keep in mind that ...


2

Here's one tutorial, and another, and another. Google also turns up a bunch of them.


2

They can't actually track the exact numbers with the level of precision that the owner of the site can. I'm not sure about w3spy.net but Alexa uses a panel to sample a subset of users then combines it with other sources of data to guesstimate the full number. I know that this is also done by other similar companies such as Quantcast and ComScore. Panels ...


2

Maybe your GA visitor numbers are more inflated than a normal site because of the more technical nature of it's audience? For example, programmers, web developers especially, are more likely to be using a range of browsers and thus increasing the cookie count. For question 1, I guess that, as with many metrics, it's better to use data from your own site ...


2

The stateless nature of HTTP is going to make it difficult for you to get an accurate picture of how many users are viewing your site's content at a given time - a user may have downloaded content from your site and be in the process of reading that content even if the content were downloaded minutes or hours ago. One way to track how many users are ...


2

I like Cliky, who is pretty interesting. Clicky is a real time web analytics service. This means that when you login and view your stats, you are seeing up to the minute data on the traffic to your web site. Most services don't let you see what's happening "today" until the day after. But, there is maybe a problem for the traffic, here what they say ...


2

In short, no, Nielsen Web Rankings will give you the most detailed summary of websites across the us/world/etc but it's based on a data collection augmented with statistical modelling. As for keywords you're best off with Google Insights for search and Google Trends but I don't think these will breakdown by state. Most paid analytics companies offer ...


2

The numbers in Google Analytics is never absolute. For example, pages per visit should have a relatively high figure, but if it is too much, it could mean that the visitors have problems finding the right information and are thus clicking everywhere. All these numbers are not individual numbers, but need to be seen in the whole picture of your website. ...


2

No there is not a way to use Alexa to determine how many visitors a website has. If you don't have access to their log files or whichever analytics program they're using how do you expect any website to estimate traffic? It's anyone's guess how much traffic a website receives. But unless you have access to their analytics or raw access logs you shouldn't ...


2

As described others here, I once "solved" this issue by moving the Google Analytics script to the head where it had previously been placed in the footer. I would assume that the page loaded the script first and then monitored the time on page. I was seeing this issue on a site with verbose source code (sorry, I can't recall how many lines ... but a lot!). ...


2

...which internet channels are good to speed up visibility of a new site? Can anyone show some tricks he do when launching new site? Since you have your advertising and SEO taken care of, you may want to clarify this part of your question. Be as specific as possible. Generally speaking, if your SEO and advertising is all set, the only thing left to do ...


2

CloudFlare works great. I use them for several sites. Here's a very basic summary of how it works: You update your DNS settings so that traffic to your site goes through CloudFlare first. Because they protect a large number of websites they are able to see things, like IP addresses, that are responsible for unusual activity. Once a certain threshold is ...


2

Unique visitors are identified by GA using the __utma cookie set by analytics. Here is a official article on Cookies used by GA. You could refer to these cookies by reading them using your server side script. If you have a login system in your app, you could try setting a customvariable as the user id (which would be unique). Here is the document on Custom ...


2

Every tool for visitors' counting works differently. Google Analytics uses 5 kinds of cookies for tracking visitors, but Statcounter may use the different ones. The second reason may be in different implementation of codes: Google Analytics loads asynchronously while Statcounter, probably, loads synchronously.


2

The difference is likely to be in the amount of time a visitor is assumed to be on the site after they view a page. For Google Analytics, the default is 30 minutes. I can't find documentation on on the WAU site about he assumptions they are making, but they may be measuring the number of visitors in the past hour or few hours. Google Analytics also has ...


2

If you're looking to do individualized tracking, there was a good discussion about this here on Stack Overflow, in which you would need to add additional info to your current tracking tag to identify a user as User-X. You would essentially be setting up a custom variable to track each user, and could then filter based on that custom variable. They also ...



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