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12

When you type the URL in a web browser, http://www.foo.com, it will always attempt to connect on port 80. It's not so much that the port is being hidden, but rather that it's being assumed, since port 80 is the default for HTTP requests. Along the same line, if you browse to https://www.foo.com, it will always attempt to connect on port 443 unless you ...


10

I'm not familiar with Linode, but all you need to do is point all the domains to server's IP address and leave the remaining for Apache Name-based Virtual Host handle, something like this: NameVirtualHost *:80 <VirtualHost *:80> ServerAdmin ... DocumentRoot /var/www/html/magento ServerName magentosite.com ServerAlias ...


5

Don't put auth directives inside a Proxy directive, put it inside a Directory directive for '/usr/share/moin/server'.


5

You might want to check out SliceHost or Linode. Neither though offers plans around what you are looking at ($10/mth). But then again I wouldn't pay less than $20/mth for a decent VPS. Less than that and you probably aren't getting the best service. Both have great tools available on their control panels, good customer service, good uptime and reasonable ...


5

One of the biggest changes from Apache 2.2 to 2.4 is the way that permissions for directories are granted. The allow from and deny from syntax is now deprecated in favor of the new require syntax. See Upgrading Apache from 2.2 to 2.4. There is a module mod_access_compat that is supposed to allow you to still use the old syntax. Unfortunately, it didn't ...


4

Here is the manual for DNS SRV records (RFC 2782) which can be used to change the default port to match what you actually use: _http._tcp.example.com. IN SRV 0 5 80 www.example.com. where next to last field is port, which can have any real value. DNS SRV records can redefine default http port for domain or only for (some) hosts inside ...


4

FIRST: First defined VirtualHost will be used as catch all for unknown domain names. Apache does not know about apples.co.uk -- it only knows about www.apples.co.uk. So it uses first Virtual Host to serve apples.co.uk. Redirect will work OK here. Apache does not know about bananas.co.uk -- it only knows about www.bananas.co.uk. So it uses first Virtual ...


4

You must put AllowOverride All in your <Directory/> section of the server configuration. The only Apache configuration files that can allow options are the ones directly in the server (main file, virtualhost, etc.). The .htaccess file can only remove override rights. That is: <VirtualHost *:80> DocumentRoot "C:/xampp/htdocs/ypp" ...


4

http://www.flowerwood.com is pointing to 69.85.232.203 http://plants.flowerwood.com is pointing to 98.124.199.1 Change the DNS record for the plants dubdomain to point to the same IP as flowerwood.com. (This post assumes default behavior of a cPanel/Apache setup. Also assuming that the subdomain is also on the same server. All pretty vanilla assumptions ...


4

Just as a matter of explanation for future users. Your 000-default.conf file is a catch-all site and should be left alone. It is good for security. It can be frustrating when a site configuration does not work and the default site is served. I get it. Still, leave it alone. Many people are unaware of why the default site exists. Here is a bit of an ...


4

You can use the Include directive to include other config files and split up your main config. # Virtual hosts Include conf/extra/httpd-vhosts.conf You can also use wildcards, so you can have each virtual host in a separate config file and include all without having to modify your main config file: Include conf/extra/vhosts/*.conf Reference: ...


3

@Cragmuer If all you want to do is host two different directories with separate user authentication, just add another <location> directive to your site config. I will assume that you have your ports.conf file setup correctly but I'll include a sample anyway. An example configuration would look like something like this: /etc/apache2/sites-available ...


3

The HTTP protocol uses port 80 by default. If you configure your web server to use a nonstandard port, then the port needs to be specified in the URL. There's no way to hide that. In Apache, you can set the listening port in httpd.conf, e.g.: Listen 127.0.0.1:80 This can however be overridden in the vhost config, e.g.: <VirtualHost *:80>


3

Apache configuration is exhaustively covered in the Apache documentation (though, if you're using Debian or Ubuntu, there are some additional considerations) and the best way to familiarize with Apache will be to study each portion of the documentation as you encounter a need to use a particular module or set of directives. To address your specific ...


3

You need to make a separate VirtualHost for each port, like so: #assuming you have this in your config NameVirtualHost *:8000 NameVirtualHost *:8001 NameVirtualHost *:8002 NameVirtualHost *:8003 # (...) Listen 8000 Listen 8001 Listen 8002 Listen 8003 # (...) Then each VirtualHost looks like this: <VirtualHost *:8000> ServerName localhost ...


3

It is most likely causing an infinite loop as they are the same. The default pages in Apache are index.html and index.htm. If the browser does not request a file name the web server will return one of those files if it finds them. So When you go to http://domain-name.com you are actually viewing http://domain-name.com/index.html just without /index.html


3

This may be kind of easy! Your: ServerName www.mydomain.com ServerAlias mydomain.com ...is backwards, should be: ServerName mydomain.com ServerAlias www.mydomain.com Also, verify your DNS settings, just in case. You should have: A record for mydomain.com that is an IP address Either a CNAME or A record where: _The CNAME is an alias ...


3

There is no penalty for as long as you don't overdo it. Just two domains on same server? Not even near the amount I'd say would be questionable. Two could be coincedence, would be very mean to penalize that. It has a bigger values wether or not you share a lot of domains on 1 IP address, or if you share an IP address with malicious sites. It's just two ...


2

The default host that is the one that is first # Default host (must be first) <virtualhost *:80> # I use localhost.localdomain, but any host name not matching later hosts gets handled here Servername localhost.localdomain DocumentRoot /home/www/default_site ... </virtualhost> <virtualhost *:80> ServerName ...


2

You can use nginx as a load balancer and configurate it to correctly handle the server certificates just as normally would happen. All the configurations are explained in http://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/howto-linux-unix-setup-nginx-ssl-proxy/ Instead of using the self-signed certificates, a purchased one can be used.


2

This is because you have not setup the SSL for the sub domain foo.example.com and so it uses the www. domain. If you do not want SSL you can simply remove the Virtual Host all together running on port 443, otherwise just add to the configuration the following: Allow foo.example.com to operate on SSL <VirtualHost *:443> ServerName ...


2

To restrict the use of foo.bar.sites.example.com you have to place another VirtualHost above the existing one: <VirtualHost *:80> ServerName foo.bar.sites.example.com ServerAlias *.*.sites.example.com # .... </VirtualHost> Now you can block or redirect the access. However it's important that you place it above the other VirtualHost ...


2

Your DNS example is missing a few elements. Here is how I would set things up. example.com A 10.0.11.101 www CNAME example.com sub-domain CNAME example.com www.sub-domain CNAME example.com If all are on a single web server, then the web server will take the request header and respond to the request accordingly. In this case, only your parent domain needs ...


2

Just do it the other way round, instead of redirecting to the domain example.com, tell the server which page to display when a user requests the domain directly. In the .htaccess file you can write (this is the default anyway): DirectoryIndex index.html Now if somebody requests http://example.com the server will actually send back the index.html file, ...


2

Stick with the same port. Port numbers are only used to initiate a connection, then they are moved to a pseudo-random port that's really high and likely not in use. The data transfer does not happen on port 80 for example. (To test this, run iptraf on your server and then download a large file from another computer. You'll notice that it's probably in the ...


2

RewriteEngine On RewriteCond %{HTTPS} off RewriteRule (.*) https://%{HTTP_HOST}%{REQUEST_URI} [R=301,L] Should do the trick.


2

Just create another virtual host for mail.example.com, and you can tell Apache to do whatever you want when people go to that host. <VirtualHost *:80> ServerAdmin admin@example.com ServerName mail.example.com ErrorLog logs/example_com-error_log # if you care about hits: CustomLog logs/example_com-access_log common Then, if you ...


2

If you have multiple users with different websites on your server, it's commonplace to place the user's website in a directory within their home folder and use the Apache configuration to point the relevant domain name at the appropriate directory. /home/somesiteuser/public_html /home/anothersiteuser/public_html ...etc... The has the added benefit of ...


2

You need to either specify a single host here, or ask whoever you're thinking about directly. This isn't done the same way by all hosts, but as far as a couple of the later points, some disclose details within their technical information for how this is calculated. Others actually provide a view of the data within their control panels. If they don't, ...



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