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17

A mix of open source/commercial and Flash/HTML5 options for hosting your own videos: Flowplayer OS FLV FLV Player f4Player JW Player Video JS (HTML5) Sublime Video Player (HTML5)


13

You need to understand that in order for the human user to view the content, the browser (or some other software) need to download it. And when the content has been downloaded to the user's computer, you no longer control the access to it. So-called "streaming" is just a download-mode where the standard viewer is programmed to automatically delete the ...


11

"Inherently" is the keyword here. Just putting videos on your page has zero impact on rankings from a on site optimization stand point. What videos help with are your engagement metrics (time on site, bounce rates, etc). Google has started taking these metrics into a more favorable account when deciding how to measure a users "experience" of their ...


8

@Ryan Steel is correct, there is no inherent value, just the value based off of the quality. One way to assure some quality is to make sure you follow the schema on http://schema.org/VideoObject on your video pages so that Google knows as much relevant information about your video as possible.


7

You'll need to reencode the video and use HTML 5's new <video> tag. Fortunately it's backward compatible so you can use it and have it fall back to flash if the browser doesn't support <video> yet. The encoding most commonly supported thus far is H.264. This site may help you get started as it has demos available.


6

If the video file is hosted elsewhere then it won't eat their bandwidth since it is coming from a completely different server assuming you are not reading the file through a server side script of your own first but directly linking to the hosted file itself. If they have bandwidth issues this is exactly how they should solve it (or find a new host with a ...


5

I have been talking to vzaar (vzaar.com) about a similar project. They are cheaper than Brightcove and have an decent API which is available on all pricing plans (unlike Brightcove who only give you access to the API on an expensive plan). They use the Edgecast CDN. Note - haven't actually committed or used them in anger yet, but on paper they seem ok.


5

Vimeo Plus is $9.95/month or $59.95/year, and offers domain level privacy: Choose exactly where your videos can be embedded on the web. There are no limits to the number of websites you can choose and you'll always have complete control of your video outside of Vimeo. You even have the option to completely hide your video on Vimeo.com so it will only ...


5

The chart below shows the approximate size of a 30 second video on various high end video-capable mobile handsets. (Adapted from Engadget's video showdown here.) iPhone 4S iPhone 4 Galaxy S II Nokia N8 Amaze 4G 30s movie size 97.5MB 40MB 49.25MB 32.5MB 38.25MB Based on these stats, I'd suggest an upload ...


5

Avoid Vimeo but not because of SEO. Per their guidelines, http://vimeo.com/guidelines, they do not allow commercials and from everything I have read they can be very strict about this so if your videos come across as anything more than informational you may end up having to move hosts. That leaves you with YouTube or hosting your own. Using YouTube is ...


4

There are many types of web filtering software with their own lists, and companies are going to turn on and off different categories of sites whichever service they use. Two that I am aware of are OpenDNS and Dan's Guardian. So you're going to have find these services and dig through their blacklists to see what they block. A quick way of blocking them ...


4

From the YouTube help page titled 'Adding sites to a filter list': As a YouTube content partner, you can filter specific AdSense advertiser domains appearing next to your YouTube videos. Here's how to filter a specific AdSense advertiser domain: Sign in to your Adsense account. On the AdSense Setup tab , click the Competitive Ad Filter ...


4

What is the best format to save these videos in? YouTube and Vimeo both currently recommend H264 (MPEG-4 AVC) video compression and AAC audio at 24, 25, or 30fps. You can find compression how-tos from YouTube and from Vimeo. If you are planning to serve the video yourself (instead of from a third-party service such as YouTube), you will likely have to ...


3

I just thought that this should be easily done in python and a Google search for "python video thumbnail" results in this site: http://notbrainsurgery.livejournal.com/29773.html You might try the sourcode provided there...


3

According to the Protocol site: Sitemap file location: Note that this means that all URLs listed in the Sitemap must use the same protocol (http, in this example) and reside on the same host as the Sitemap. For instance, if the Sitemap is located at http://www.example.com/sitemap.xml, it can't include URLs from ...


3

A combination of Wowza Media Server and the open source Flowplayer flash application do a great job of streaming archived video from a website. The City of Nanaimo is using these tools along with Adobe's Flash Media Live Encoder and ffmpeg for their council video archives (example)


3

Video hosting providers Watershed from Ustream offers Pay as You Go Pricing starting at $1 per 'viewer hour', where 60 plays of a one minute video cost you $1. PAYG pricing is generally much more expensive and can feel like signing a blank cheque, but it might suit you to begin with if your videos are short. Just keep a close eye on usage and consider ...


3

You will have to include video information in your sitemap. The "more information about..." link near bottom of that page will give you the specifics on elements, etc. If you happen to already produce an mRSS feed, you can also use that.


3

Current browsers have the functionality to play video in certain formats, without requiring an extra plugin and few years ago all browsers needed a plugin that had to be installed separately. One of the reasons html5 video took so long was/is software patents. A browser can be downloaded freely, but to play a video the browser maker had to pay a patent fee ...


3

Your requirements go into some things I haven't had to examine, but you might check out MediaCore. The underlying software is open source if you're also considering self-hosting. Cumulus is another "video platform" application, but self-hosted only. It's also a younger project, so may not have all the capabilities you need.


3

It's not going to make a difference and the Panda algorithm isn't going to be a factor in this since it deas with lots of low quality content. Three pages of anything definitely isn't a lot. Use whatever is easier for you to manage. If you use Vimeo or Youtube you save yourself a lot of trouble and bandwidth. But if you find working with video to be easy and ...


3

As mentioned by Prasad, there is a lot of free tools over the internet that you can just copy and paste and it's done. So I would say it's pretty easy for us developers to do that... Where it could raise the price is if you want some king of interface where you can add or delete videos yourself on your website. That's the more complicated part because the ...


3

Do Videos Bring more Traffic than backlinks in General? Yes and No.. It really depends if your page(s) are already ranking, and then the quality of backlinks you have. Ultimately if your number one on the page then no, it simply won't. You should consider YouTube as a Social Tool to bring in more visitors to your site on phrases that you may not be ...


3

You'll need to add some RDFa meta data to the header of your pages which contain video. For Facebook specifically, you'll need to add a <link rel="image_src" href="/URL/TO/VIDEO_THUMBNAIL.jpg" /> tag to indicate the video thumbnail, and a <link rel="video_src" href="/URL/TO/PLAY/VIDEO" /> to indicate the video player. Note that the video_src tag ...


3

I found a good answer for you from this Stack Overflow question: Both the youtube player and the video content is streamed from YouTube's server. The only price you pay is the few bytes it takes to add the video player embed code in your HTML pages.


2

Can't miss the holy grail of video systems, FFMPEG. It does just about everything you might need to in online video--take in multiple formats and convert to another, thumbnail, etc. A heavily modified industrial variation of FFMPEG is what allows YouTube to work the way it does. Here's a quick command line tut for thumbnailing: ...


2

YouTube also offers "unlisted" videos which allow you to put a video on YouTube but not have it show up on your user page or in searches - you just require the URL in order to find it. More Details at the YouTube help page


2

Very few smallish video sites are turning a profit and, arguably, very few of the large ones would exist if it weren't for their corporate backing to absorb costs associated with scaling along the way. I would argue though that the niche sites that have a strong core audience have a better chance to target advertising in a way that converts (i.e. if you had ...


2

Get Miro Video Converter and use it to convert your videos to Theora, WebM or MP4s and they will work across all browsers. Furthermore, you may wish to read this article for a crash course on how to implement video correctly across all browsers. UPDATE Actually, I apologize, I just read the last part of your question about not wanting to support WebM, and ...


2

Take a look at Vzaar which uses the EdgeCast CDN, Google Analytics, Flash to display and also you can limit the videos to play on certain domains so you could put it on a subdomain that only authenticated users can access. It also has the option of displaying an unbranded video. Not all of these features are free, but I guess if people are paying to access ...



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