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25

I would avoid hyphens in the domain name. While they are useful in the path for a file or post, they add unneeded noise to the domain itself. Imagine having to spell it out for someone..."stack dash overflow dot com" just doesn't sound right. On the other hand, there are likely some domains where a well-placed hyphen would be beneficial. For example: ...


12

When you're at bottom, I believe the only way to move yourself up is to outwork the competition. It's not the fun or easy answer. But when money isn't readily available, you have to overcome your limitations by working harder. To translate this idea, it's time for --you-- to start writing, or to find people who can help at no cost. If you have a great ...


8

Depending on your target audience ('normal', very tech savvy, or originating from social networks) either: email address & password (the email address is the username) or OpenID, Facebook Connect, or similar federated login. Both have their issues. In some audiences email addresses change a lot. You need a good account recovery mechanism, ...


8

Domain name: No. (It’s not normal and is harder to remember. However, preference is okay. It doesn’t affect ranking.) For example, http://webmasters.stackexchange.com/questions/410/is-it-better-to-put-hyphens-in-a-domain-name File Location in URL: Yes. (It’s easier for people to read.) For example, http: ...


7

When viewing your website data, choose Visitors > Visitor Trending > Visits from the Analytics left-hand sidebar menu: Select the date range you're interested in, and then click the clock to the right of "Graph by" in the top right of your screen: You'll see a graph and bar chart showing visits by time for the date range you selected: It's ...


6

That's because of COPPA - Children's Online Privacy Protection Act. From WikiPedia: The act, effective April 21, 2000, applies to the online collection of personal information by persons or entities under U.S. jurisdiction from children under 13 years of age. It details what a website operator must include in a privacy policy, when and how to seek ...


5

Regularly post great content, obtained by whatever means are available to you. There's nothing wrong with ghost writers. They give you better control to define what you're site is about. Regularly promote the site, by whatever means are available to you. Don't forget the routes traditionally used by any new product; eg newspaper, magazine, journal ...


5

I'd offer both (I really wish Stack Overflow did). Some people want a more 'professional' or perhaps even site-agnostic gravatar to follow them from place to place, but might want to use a more informal or funny avatar on your web site. Others might be concerned with Gravatar knowing a little too much about the surfing habits of people that use their ...


5

Multiple pages. I've been burned before by single-page checkouts where I wasn't given the oppertunity to verify my details before submitting the payment. Always give the user the oppertunity to confirm and change their shipping address in a seperate step, as this is what people are used to and expect. Also, the user doesn't have to re-enter 27 fields if ...


5

Redirecting visitors to the homepage when they've requested a subpage is generally a bad idea because: Search engines will cease to index subpage content, resulting in big traffic drops. Users will struggle to find the information that brought them to the site in the first place. However, if there's a very good reason to do so (and I can think of few), ...


5

Sounds to me your after a Inline WYSIWYG Editor, there happens to be many on the market that you can integrate into your current setup. Of course a content management system is better if you want to allow more than yourself using the engine. Here's just a few to get you started: CKEditor TinyMCE Aloha Editor NicEdit Snippetedit Wymeditor ...


4

Depends on your user-base: In Germany everyone would expect hyphens in domain names. In the English-speaking world you should probably avoid them: Nobody expects them there and mistypes There is no real right way to pronounce it. On SEO perspective it doesn't matter. Both names rank the same. And of course in doubt you should purchase both. Every user ...


4

This is an interesting question, but probably not one with a simple answer. I think, unless you're already well-connected and well-known from something else, it's just down to having a good idea and executing it well, and then from there you simply have to trust in free word-of-mouth promotion (if you don't have a marketing budget). Sites like Tutsplus ...


4

As answered by @danlefree, usability researches are what we have easily available as of now. You can find Jakob Nielsen's researches a good point to start with reading.


4

I ran an I.T. company and we used a product called Connectwise. It's generally considered the best of its kind, and it automatically opens tickets up from emails sent in by clients. The main competitor to ConnecWise is AutoTask. It has a good user base, too, but runs only SaaS -- no local install option. Some additional options that might be worth checking ...


4

Visiting at the same time is a "relative" concept. The server feeds the user a page and then the user will see it for an undetermined amount of time. If the user requests a second page you can assume that the user has been on the first page for that duration (even though it's only an assumption). You could write all that down to a database and extract ...


4

I know I'm bringing a question back from the dead, but what the poster is looking for is called "load testing" and it is hard to do this yourself. There are sites that can handle this for you, some with tests that can be run for free. One such site is http://loadimpact.com/, it simulates users on your site and slowly increases the number of simulated users ...


4

A resource that you may find helpful is the Managing Communities blog at http://www.managingcommunities.com/ You'll find information and tips for moderating and growing your forum/community effectively.


4

I imagine that if economic embargoes/sanctions were to be enforced over the internet, it wouldn't be enforced at the website level. Think about how impractical it would be to require every webmaster out there to keep an updated list of embargoed countries and have to block all visitors from that country. And it's not like a North Korean internet user has a ...


4

There is no simple solution to this problem. Static passwords may be shared among friends. Tracking mechanisms (IP-addresses, cookies) will turn up "false positives" (i.e. rejecting real paying members) - which is very bad for business. Using a OTP (One Time Password), as suggested by Steve, is probably not practical, as it does not allow casual use, and ...


3

If there's only one user, then some sort of HTTP authentication will be fine. I would suggest using Digest rather than Basic authentication. I know you weren't looking for programming tips, but you could probably save yourself a fair bit of time by reading this. A couple of database-less CMSes are as follows: CMS From Scratch gpEasy (there's a howto ...


3

I really think this would be a security issue if you can see it with JS or Flash. Actually, neither JS or Flash shouldn't offer access to any details of the user's PC except some very basic data about the OS, browser, screen resolution and such, things that you would actually need quite often. Who knows, might be possible with IE6 :D


3

I'm in this boat too....my company builds a SAAS application for marketers who in turn sell the product to their clients. Needless to say, the multiple depths can get pretty crazy in a hurry when you're trying to distribute customized info such as analytics. Here's how we clobbered the problem: Like you, analytics hosted on the server were eating ...


3

People agree to anonymously share their browsing habits with these companies in return for perks, such as toolbars and analytics packages. The companies use these habits and mine data from other sources (e.g. other companies like them) to build an estimate of traffic flow. From Alexa's about page: The traffic rank is based on three months of aggregated ...


3

If you are a Linux user you can use ab (Apache benchmark) or siege from your own home PC or from some other remote location. You should increase number of connections (start with 10 paralel users ) as long as req/s (requests per second) are going up. If you get 100 req/s that means that you hosting can serve 100 people at one second, but please keep in mind ...


3

I believe requiring user accounts for basic interaction with a website (like in your case) creates a poor user experience. You're much more likely to entise the odd few users to give some input if you make the process as easy as possible. To make the process as easy as possible and succeed in harvesting a bit of info from your visitors I would: Scrap the ...


3

I would not go with a 404 page. A 404 page is not just page, but also a response. It lets the client know that the page was not found. That it was somehow deleted or the url is wrong. If you are using some sort of session to hide information that is availabe only to logged in users, then you can use your server side scripting language of choice, (asp, ...


3

It's never a good idea. Chrome and Firefox (and for some feature IE10+ as well) have an excellent support of recent standard. One thing that could produce differents results is the different interpretations of errors (not-closed html tag, use of not standard calls or prefixes -webkit-) So if you have some error (visual or logic) it's reasonable to think ...


3

As correctly noted by others, you should not demand that the users use a specific application to visit your website (even a Chromium user may visit your website from different devices with different browsers). In general, you should check your website's rendering on all major browsers (Firefox, Chromium, IE, Safari, Opera). If you use a specific new ...



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