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10

Personally I would put domain.com on contact cards,etc and have it redirect to www.domain.com. This can be done with a simple rewrite. The reason for this is that my users should never be concerned with having to type www. I absolutely hate sites that require people to type the www - I think it's a completely outdated requirement from years gone by. You ...


10

Have a look at this study by UXmatters. It is fairly in depth, includes data on eye-tracking, and concludes that labels on top is overall the best solution. There is a similar article by Luke Wroblewski, also fairly detailed. Both articles are worth reading!


5

I think SO's minimal editor with markdown syntax has been remarkably effective for the purpose that it serves. In my opinion, the less HTML you have to deal with in submitted data, the better. Unless users need to organize and post data in tables or something, I really don't see the need for a WYSIWYG editor. The common tags that you'll want to allow are: ...


5

The most important thing is to be consistent with the rest of your site. In general most websites do the labels to the left of the text fields. In this cause it would be a long description so make sure you have room and it flows well. If to the left doesn't look right or there isn't room to do it, then I would do above. As that is very clear. The only ...


4

Define "effectiveness". If by "effective" you mean effective at capturing the community consensus, then they're all effective. If by "effectiveness" you mean the richness of the data returned, then using a point scale is going to be more "effective" than using a binary system. If by "effectiveness" you mean ease implementing a collaborative filtering system, ...


4

Normally, for your situation, at the top or to the left is best. Just be sure the label comes before the input field for accessibility. Still there are many different ways to layout a page and be accessible. Form labels can really appear just about anywhere you want them as long as it makes since. This recourse is worth a look, ...


3

There are two options that are considered best: labels to the left of the field, flushed right so they are close to the input. labels above the field itself another important thing to note for usability to make sure you are using the for attribute of the label, so that clicking the label focuses on the field it labels.


3

I personally prefer the www domains. As one of @Jonathon's points, the real main reason is with cookies. When you have domain.com and you apply a cookie to it, that cookie governs all sub domains such as www.domain.com, foo.domain.com and bar.domain.com which can cause you headaches in the future if you're dealing with sessions or security. You can always ...


2

How about putting the new website up alongside the old website? You could begin with having the old website as the default view, with a link saying 'Try out the new website' at the top, for example. Make it easy for users to provide feedback, so they can tell you about any transition problems they had (you could use something like UserVoice to save hassle). ...


2

Make it a game where people get points for fixing the data (checking that the pricing APIs product is the same, isn't invalid etc.) People with low points don't get awarded them until a number of other users have fixed the data in the same way. As people get more points it needs fewer other people to crosscheck them, until people with very high points don't ...


1

Other then the factors you have already stated I would say it mainly depends on what you expect people will do with the printable version of your productinformation: If they will mainly just print them out then will most likely be the best option. If you think people will want to safe them and send them around I guess a PDF would be superior for obivous ...


1

I'd call it tag suggestion. This jquery plugin does sort of what you want http://plugins.jquery.com/project/tag-it/ but with no actual bubble. You can probably do the bubble with some CSS styling to get rounded corners.


1

I would re-emphasize the importance of validating the information you collect. After all, if it's important enough to collect it, you better make sure it's correct against the right authorities/sources. If it's not that important, why collect it at all and burden the user? I work for SmartyStreets where we validate users' locations, specifically their ...


1

While my IP is dynamic (DHCP) it's never accurate to my city at times the city can be 60 miles away. If you're application is forcing users to that city you're going to have a high bounce rate. You're best bet is to use MaxMind IP to Country database which is stored locally and is faster than API's. Gather the country of the IP behind the scenes don't force ...


1

YELP did a lot of advertising when they first launched, I would advise following suit and getting a budget together for a large campaign. Hooking into social networks would be a good way to make it easy for early users to share with their network of friends and colleagues. Finally, I agree with @itpian.com - % of earnings and gamifying everything with a ...


1

Forget anything that says http:// -- too scary for non-geeks, and browsers handle this well enough these days (Chrome doesn't even show it on latest builds). yoursite.com is, strictly speaking, the correct way to represent the domain, as the www. is deprecated. However, the average man (or woman) in the street is more familiar with seeing www.yoursite.com, ...


1

I don't know if the http:// is really required as mentioned above. Most browsers will assume http:// when a URL is type into the address bar if it is not present when the enter button is pressed. I'd say it only really is necessary in hyperlinks as then it is necessary for the link to function properly (unless the browsers assume http:// but at last check ...


1

I would advise you to reserve a div/box for the country flag and set its visibility as hidden, thereby reserving its space. Offer the user a regular dropdown list and let the flag fade-in as they select the country (assuming they are filling out a regular form). The idea behind is that the user should never be offered the option of setting the flag as it is ...


1

Answer: None of the above. Use placeholder text inside the field itself. The placeholder attribute is a built-in part of HTML-5. Otherwise, I'd say put it above the fields, left-aligned.


1

Generally, as few options as possible to allow your users to express their ideas. Some sites simply add bold and italic buttons and that works. Any other system will require a certain amount of training. Others to consider are the Markdown and Wikipedia syntaxes. It's also notable that many large sites simply don't allow any additional markup, for example, ...


1

I've run into SO many problems with Microsoft Word as a UI person who specializes in custom CMS solutions. While many tools out there have "paste from word" features in them, I can't tell you how many times I've gotten calls late at night because a user "forgot" or "refuses" to use that feature. Without additional post-processing to scrub the miles of ...



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