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-1

Not at all. StackExchange does it. Google doesn't care if you link to sister sites, as long as you're not committing link spam.


1

In page RSS buttons provide an important function beyond simply telling the end user that RSS is available. Some users do not use an automated RSS feed reader which captures feeds from all sites they visit rather they manually choose which sites feeds they want to look at. The best option is to have both the rel=alternate tag as well as the RSS button. The ...


1

I find them very useful. We all associate with well-known images or icons and if I'm browsing a site and want to know if it has a feed I might like to subscribe to, the little orange button stands out. From there, my workflow is this: I'll right-click and get the feed link. (If not, like your news site example, it'll take me to a page full of RSS links). I ...


14

Possible advantages of having visible feed links: For visitors that know what feeds are: If they (currently) don’t use a user agent with feed autodiscovery¹, they still get informed that you offer feeds and which URLs they have. If they use a user agent with feed autodiscovery, they might not expect to find a feed on your site (and therefore don’t pay ...


3

My thoughts from an ecom+blog perspective: You do not need the button itself unless you want to offer something for a user using their eyes, without any helper tools alerting that RSS is available, to click into the feed. IMO the preferred way to alert automation/tools/reader-plugins that a feed is available is to use rel="alternate" link in the ...


1

After all those years, RSS has deescalated. New methods like push notifications dominated the RSS. But it doesn't mean RSS or RSS buttons are not needed anymore. RSS can be used as a mini API to interact with a website's content. I don't think there is any simpler way to do this. In regard to buttons, RSS buttons are the most compact way to notify users ...


10

I use RSS all the time, and I find RSS buttons on websites very useful. Simple, when I see them, I know website offer RSS, it is more intuitive way to find feeds than checking footer or something else. I usually expect RSS button to be next to social media icons/buttons, or a small/discreet icon with text somewhere in header. I guess some websites do not ...


2

If for no other reason, it lets people know there is a RSS feed. Whether they click on it or not doesn't matter.



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