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33

There is no SEO benefit as self-links are ignored by the PageRank algorithm. However, this is often done (on other sites and blog posts too) for a couple of reasons: It allows you to refresh the page quickly, and in some instances without the warning that you are resubmitting postdata. Similarly you can re-request the page from scratch, useful if you for ...


18

I'm surprised no one mentioned progressive enhancement. There's rarely a good reason to have functionality or content that requires JavaScript to work. Yes, JavaScript can make the user experience better, but it shouldn't be required to make the user experience possible. So my answer is, you should build your website so everyone can access everything, even ...


14

I prefer option #3 as it does not require the user to do anything special such as entering a special number or character. This makes it more difficult for the user to make a mistake. It also is easy to handle programmatically and, assuming you name your fields and variables appropriately, make your code cleaner and easy to maintain since the special value is ...


13

It depends upon the people you are trying to reach with your emails. Do you absolutely need to have a text side to your emails? No. However you should consider: There are still a number of email clients, usually web and mobile based, that allow for a text only view (Horde, some older Blackberry devices, etc). You also have no guarantee that a non-text ...


12

That depends on the site, its purpose, and who the demographic is. If you're designing a government website, a banking site, a corporate home page, etc, then you absolutely should make sure the site works without JavaScript. But if you're designing an entertainment/leisure site like Twitter or Facebook, then it's not so bad to require JavaScript. And if ...


10

Have a look at this study by UXmatters. It is fairly in depth, includes data on eye-tracking, and concludes that labels on top is overall the best solution. There is a similar article by Luke Wroblewski, also fairly detailed. Both articles are worth reading!


10

It doesn't have to be unique. But if it's not it makes your life more difficult. Having a unique username means there is only one possible password for that username. If it's wrong, you don't have to go looking for another user with the same username to compare it to. It's gets really complicated when someone requests a missing password. How do you know who ...


10

As the Creator of Lucky Orange I'm a bit biased. The goal of the tool is to help figure out problem areas on your site so you can fix them and IMPROVE your customer's experience. That being said you are required to tell your visitors that you perform this kind of tracking in your privacy policy. We are working on creating a wizard to help generate that for ...


8

W3Schools (for example) has some statistics on browser displays. As of January 2010: Higher 1024x768 800x600 640x480 Unknown 76% 20% 1% 0% 3% The Higher figure links to a new table. From the figures it looks like 1024x768 is the effective minimum screen resolution. However, you should remember that not everybody ...


7

A custom 404 page is your opportunity to turn a bad experience into a good one. No matter how well built your website is you can't stop someone from typing a URL in their address incorrectly, so you need to be prepared for those users who somehow can't find the content they are looking for. A custom 404 page gives you an opportunity to help that user. A ...


6

Instead of targeting a specific browser and resolution, I would start with the assumption that you want your site to usable by as wide a variety of users as possible. Try to make things adapt to different screen sizes and work in all browsers. That said, I think its safe to assume 1024x768 for desktop browsing.


6

Have your mother use it. I'm not kidding. Ask her to visit it then tell you what it does, make sure you are nowhere in the vicinity when she tries it. Doesn't have to be mom, just someone who doesn't have a technical background and who uses their browser for only a few basic tasks. "Hallway testing" is important, but most people in the hallway (if at your ...


6

Loaded Question! You will need to conduct user tests. Try reading "Don't make me Think" and "Rocket Surgery Made Easy" by Steve Krug. These book are a must read for this topic and will show you how to do the testing.


6

You may want to look into <link rel="canonical" />. See http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.com/2009/02/specify-your-canonical.html. Down in the comments someone from Google says that it can be used for http/https issues. Caveat: I'm not sure if and to what extent <link rel="canonical" /> is supported by search engines other than Google, ...


6

I would think neither would make a difference except for preference. Search engines are looking at word boundries (programming term) when parsing a string and would not recognize these characters as either a word nor a part of an HTML tag and likely will ignore them completely. From an SEO perspective, they would likely be totally ignored.


5

I'm not a lawyer, take my advice as only that. You might want to speak to one about this issue. However, as long a you provide a good privacy policy on your site, normally in the footer of your site, you should be good to go. Also, as with all JavaScript, you want the benefits of your tracking to out weigh the costs. Basically, is the information producing ...


5

A more global set of statistics indicate that 1024x768 is indeed the most popular resolution, however the distribution of users is very different. Also note that netbooks, they suppose, are helping 800x600 hang on. In modern browsers you can target ranges with Media Queries. They're awesome. Assuming you don't care about IE – although IE9 promises ...


5

The most important thing is to be consistent with the rest of your site. In general most websites do the labels to the left of the text fields. In this cause it would be a long description so make sure you have room and it flows well. If to the left doesn't look right or there isn't room to do it, then I would do above. As that is very clear. The only ...


5

Whatever the recipient needs to know to assist the user should be included on the form. Never ask for less then what you need. All you really need is a name and a contact method (email address, phone number) but in some situations asking for more information, like a product serial number if it is a warranty issue, etc, should be required as it greatly ...


5

Unless you have some pressing need to insulate employees from contact with the world except through email, a contact page should have proper contact information on it. Every piece of information should be transparent (and accurate). People visiting contact pages are largely performing research or attempting to find information about products/services that is ...


5

Do they have to be unique? No. Should they be unique? Depends upon what you think should happen when two users with the same username and password both try logging in at the same time.


5

I'm not a UI/UX specialist, but based on my experience I would do the following: keep a boring but grandpa-recognizable links "Log In" and "Sign Up" at top right corner. make a nice call-to-action button "Become a ninja" and place it on the page content, linking to "sign up" page.


5

I hate this. I hate it, hate it, hate it. Every time I see a website that makes me fxcking register just to get a fxking download I generally leave the site because someone else is going to offer it for less work. These sites also stink of marketing-collectors so when I see them, I feel that if I DO sign up, I'm going to get spammed to the end of the world ...


5

I would argue that you should follow similar practises to external websites, as they are competitors for your employees time and attention. So usefulness and attractiveness are important. Your bosses may want the intranet to feature corporate messages, but the employees want useful information. It should be a place for fostering the relationships and ...


5

There are a couple things, but the basic objective (and thus approach) is the same. You want users to actually use the intranet: Have news or interesting company info (that changes) on the home page If your company has Yammer -- implement a yammer feed on the home page Give users some customization options (weather, if you have more than one office, let ...


5

First of all, not all browsers will redirect when given a Location header. Second, not all browsers will redirect with Javascript because it is disabled. Third, not all browsers will support the meta-refresh tags. Any of these cases is probably very rare so it probably won't matter. But even if it does, you can overlap all of these methods I think. The way ...


5

KISSInsights offers a widget that lets you collect feedback from users about the page they're on. They charge $29/month if you need to be able to write your own question. (The default question is, “How did you first hear about us?”, which probably isn't what you want.) I've used this for the exact use case you describe (“Was this page useful?”). You could ...


4

Normally, for your situation, at the top or to the left is best. Just be sure the label comes before the input field for accessibility. Still there are many different ways to layout a page and be accessible. Form labels can really appear just about anywhere you want them as long as it makes since. This recourse is worth a look, ...


4

If the page is long, or very segmented (like an FAQ might be) a back to top link can be a very handy feature and improve the usability of your website. If you're putting them on your page just because you feel like it then just like any extraneous content/features it's just noise. Always do something with a purpose. Not just because you can. (A common ...


4

Well, I'm a developer/programmer/coding guy. This means, I always go for some information about design before answer such questions. I like Jakob Nielsen's articles, because they research before posting. http://www.useit.com/alertbox/mega-dropdown-menus.html http://www.useit.com/alertbox/navigation-menu-alignment.html ...



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