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0

Instead of installing a database, as you already have the redirect setup, you should be able to collect the access logs on your HTTP server(s) (guessing Apache if you're using .htaccess?) and use any number of packages to analyze it. Things ranging from the free AWStats to (often paid) Splunk. Of course this assumes you at least have access to the access ...


0

To track clicks you could create a database which records the clicks. So something like what you have already done via unique url on your site. For each link create a row with link url (to redirect to) and click_id to know which to update. example.com/track.php?click_id=2 redirects to google.com example.com/track.php?click_id=2 redirects to yahoo.com Once ...


1

Two easy ways to fix this, depending on whether you want to customise just one blog post or make the change site-wide. For just one post, manually set its URL in the YAML front matter like so: --- permalink: /2013/11/10/mypost.html --- To change every post site-wide, you would edit your _config.yml to switch from the default 'date' permalink pattern you ...


2

It appears that the only thing that you would need to escape in that URL would be the : https://organization.proxive.se/proxive/https%3A//www.google.com/ Then your URL wouldn't use any disallowed characters and the directories would still be on the sub URL for supporting some relative links. I just want to point out that not all relative links will ...


1

I like to think of the trailing dot as the "real" root of the Internet, and that it lives in Virginia, USA. If you leave out the dot, then some root is always implied. For normal users, it's the same root, and that's the situation I will discuss today. In my perverse way, I actually find the trailing dot quite handy. If I'm checking out someone else's ...


1

Don't forget that there is also a 50MB limit to the uncompressed sitemap size. If each of your 50,000 pages had 1,000 images and each image entry in your sitemap were 50 bytes, your entire sitemap would end up being about 2GB. Clearly that is too large. Even including about 20 images per page would put you right about at the 50MB limit. I can't find any ...


1

You are somewhat confused about the different parts of the URL. Let me break them out for you: https://www.example.com/path https is the protocol www is the subdomain example.com is the domain name com is the top level domain /path is the URL path How can URLs have a dot . at the end, e.g. www.bla.de.? is about the domain name ending in a . ...


1

To partially answer your question, you can add it to htaccess canonical forwarder rules. In a basic HTTP sense it looks for a period before the URI and works it into whatever anti-duplicate forwarding mechanism you use. Here is an example including a common "addon domain" sub util route: RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} ^domain\.hostdomain\.com(|\.)$ [OR] ...


1

Setting up DNS to allow any subdomain is known as wildcard subdomains. Allowing any subdomain through this mechanism is fine for SEO as long as they redirect. My domains are all set up this way. Since you say you have a redirect in place that will take users to the canonical www subdomain, there will be no SEO problems. It would be an SEO problem to ...


1

Yes, it may affect if the sub-domains point to same content pages. All you need to do is use 301 re-direct and canonical here is the link: When to use canonical? Prepaid products of different values


0

If you are looking at the auto-generated rewrites in Magento's 'URL Rewrite Management' page then all of those URL re-writes are actually necessary in order for Magento to serve your products/categories at search engine friendly URL's. For example:- www.example.com/2000-2004-vw-sharan-starter-motor Instead of:- ...


3

A slash at the end of a domain tells the server that the request is for the directory and that it should look for the default file (index.html, index.php) first. It allows for faster loading time by telling the browser to look for the default file. Traditionally, URLs that pointed to files did not include the trailing slash, while URLs that pointed ...


1

All websites can be accessed with or without a slash on the domain name. All of the following work: www.google.com/ and www.google.com www.khanacademy.org/ and www.khanacademy.org In fact, when the browser requests home pages, it is required to submit the slash in the request, even if the slash is not present on the URL. This is a valid http request ...


40

Hostnames without a trailing dot are potentially ambiguous. A trailing dot means that the hostname is fully qualified and may not be relative to the local search domain. Imagine you are a student of the (fictive) Example University which has the second-level domain example.edu. Inside the university's campus network you can omit the .example.edu suffix for ...


49

From here It's a little-known fact, but fully-qualified (unambiguous) DNS domain names have a dot at the end. People running DNS servers usually know this (if you miss the trailing dots out, your DNS configuration is unlikely to work) but the general public usually doesn't. A domain name that doesn't have a dot at the end is not fully-qualified ...


-4

I think the answer is that most Internet tools just drop the . or treat it as extra path information. Note that this is a very tricky illusion. youtu.be is not youtube.be. Not sure, but this might be abuse.


3

Analyzing this remotely is almost impossible, but here’s my guess: You did not patch/update your Drupal installation quickly after the security advisory SA-CORE-2014-005 was published. This was a highly critical vulnerability, referred to as "Drupageddon". An attacker exploited the vulnerability and got access to your installation. The attacker created ...


1

Yep! You were hacked. You have been hacked for a period of time too. Not to panic! It happens enough and can potentially be a low-level breach that can be fixed with not too much worry. HTTPS vs. HTTP is another protocol and not another site. Theoretically, these should be the same site served as either HTTP protocol port 80 or secured/encrypted HTTP ...


4

There may not be any way to find out when an arbitrary web page was first indexed by Google — certainly I don't know of any way to do so. It's possible that Google simply does not store that information, since there's no real reason why they'd need to. Besides, even if they do store this information, they really have no particular reason to make it ...


6

To know the age of an URL you can follow this link by replacing www.example.com by the URL you want: https://www.google.com/search?tbs=cdr%3A1%2Ccd_min%3A1%2F1%2F2000&q=site%3Ahttp%3A%2F%2Fwww.example.com&safe=active&gws_rd=ssl For example, here's the result from Google for the Meta site of Stack Overflow: Otherwise, the Wayback machine is ...


1

When you have the same content available at many different URLs, you can use URL canonicalization to tell which set of URLs are the preferred ones for search engines to crawl and index. Google introduced a link rel canonical meta tag for this purpose. Lets say that you want to make 500 photos per page the canonical URL. On the other URLs ...


3

Zistoloen found a way to have Google display the date when it first indexed the content of the page. I'm adding it to my answer as well because I think I can explain it more clearly. Search Google for something that brings up the page you want as a result Use "Search Tools" Select "Custom Range..." from the "Any time" drop down Put in a large date range ...



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