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In this Google page: https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/66359?hl=en Duplicate content generally refers to substantive blocks of content within or across domains that either completely match other content or are appreciably similar. Mostly, this is not deceptive in origin. Examples of non-malicious duplicate content could include: ...


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Your "SEO expert" might be a lying bastard, but this probably isn't the reason. He's absolutely right about this. This is a little known edge case in URL construction. RFC 3986 is the official definition of the URL format and rules on how to encode and decode URL. Any URL parser should be following this as closely as possible to avoid errors and be ...


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Technically, a URL can be 2083 characters long but some say the real limit is 2000. I am not about to test this. Okay. Not what you are looking for? Remember that there is a lot of advice out there some of it very real, some silly as [redacted], and some culled completely from the dark smelly nether-regions (you know... New Jersey!). The practical reality ...


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I would go for the first set but without dining in last 3. However, you need to take care of the technical side. example.com/dining (HUB for all dining) example.com/restaurants (HUB specifically for restaurants) example.com/cafes (HUB specifically for cafes) example.com/restaurants/red-onion-club (actual page for that venue)


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Yes, definitely include them in your main sitemap. You still want your product URLs indexed as fast as possible, and a sitemap will help with that.


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There is one case in which a trailing slash will help with search engine optimization (SEO). That is the case that your document has what appears to be a file extension that is not .html. This becomes an issue with sites that are rating websites. They might choose between these two urls: http://mysite.example.com/rated.example.com ...


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URL's with and without slashes are treated as two different URL's. Its absolutely essential that you fix this to avoid duplicate content problems. Generally, this affects the whole site, as every page has a duplicate. Standardize site wide URL's Use 301 redirects or canonicalization to fix URL's Do an internal link audit to make sure there are no ...


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These are no resources which get usually accessed by the browser but simply a fancy way to declare a name space, i.e. all SVG images share the same XML name space which is defined by the URL and same with xlink. This means you should treat any of these xmlns just as some kind of special string and leave them unchanged.


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Include just the last part of the URI then use canonicals to trunc out the middle levels for bots. The shortened URI [with identifier string if needed] does not have to be visible for avg human use on the site, although they may see it clicking in from SERPS. This shorter [identifier] URI really isnt a big deal IMO since it will revert back to human-friendly ...


4

Humans can get confused/irritated by deep hierarchies. Be kind to your users. Google Analytics only analyzes (breaks up) the first 4 path parts You know that geographies aren't really hierarchical right? What continent is Turkey in? What state is Texarkana in? You should use a hyphen to break up words in URLs.


1

The answer is not completely straightforward. SEO has to be linked to user experience and to the business needs of the site. Don't do things just for SEO purposes, but think of SEO together with UX and architecture. When it comes to URL structure, I always tell clients to keep URLs as similar as possible to the user path through the site. They should show ...


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Google seems to put very little weight on how a URL is structured right now. You can confirm this by doing any Google search and looking at the URLs that are ranking. You are just as likely to see any of these styles: Exact match domain: www.keyword-phrase.com Exact keyword path: example.com/keyword-phrase Lots of directories: ...


5

This related thread, Well structured URLs vs. URLs optimized for SEO , explains it pretty well. My understanding is that the URL will have a slight SEO effect depending on how users tend to search for content on your site but a logic site structure that is easy to update (as websites rarely are static) could perhaps be more valuable than the SEO advantage... ...


0

This is not an issue generated by the theme, in order to add categories into you URL you'll need to to change your URL structure. In order to do this you'll need to navigate to: wp-admin => Settings => Permalink Where you'll find a section like this: By selecting the Custom Structure option you can modify your URL the way you want, for example: ...


1

It looks like you're trying to change the destination of the page via javascript. I agree with the answer and comments above. Just don't do this act unless of course you're playing around with javascript on your own private server. This is how you should make your link: <a href="example.com">Some link</a> That's all. No javascript required.


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Google has far too many PhDs on their payroll to think that you have one over on them and they haven't thought of this already. They can read your javascript, too. Any attempt to cloak in any way will let you screw yourself and not by Google.


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As far as I'm aware Google Play Music only supports sharing URLS rather than embedding to equal that offered by YouTube and other Google services. There is no official API library either but some people have made there own, but be careful as you need to ensure that it doesn't break there terms of use.


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Google does not display http://, it does however display https:// and does this to indicate to users that the site uses SSL. Sites that do not force SSL will display with no protocol. Google is pushing for SSL to become the standard while it has users security in mind but it is also my opinion that they have an agenda behind this... because when all search ...


1

I think you might want to go to a link like this: // Close to domain: http://www.example.com/article-name // Or, alternatively, add a 'prefix' (e.g.: /blog/article, or /products/article): http://www.example.com/articles/article-name This will improve the SEO power of the url, because it's a lot shorter, and the relevant part (article-name) is closer to ...


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I would consider removing "knowledge-base/category-name/" from your URL altogether. Those aren't helping SEO, they are only making your URLs longer, harder to remember, and harder to type. Keywords in the URL path are a very minor ranking factor now. Your article name is going to have plenty of keywords anyway. Without the category name in the URL, ...


5

The right way to avoid SEO duplicates is to use a canonical URL for each page. So your article could show in as many categories as you'd want and the canonical URL would be set to the URL of the article itself. Here are Google results which might help you implement this: ...


0

Keywords in URL Keywords in the URL have always been and will always be just one of many content indicators, therefor its not needed as Google has many other ways of establishing what the page is about. You should make urls that makes sense for both your business and your site visitors, don't simply create bloating URLS to satisfy Google, some companies ...


1

Using a lot of "/" in url is not good for SEO optimization. Not true. And, even if it was, you won't need a lot for this to be an issue. You can solve this by putting differentiating information in the URLs of locations that occur in more than one country, or in the US, state. You can put the differentiating information in the URL and appear as a ...


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While i am familiar with the concept that google ranks subdirectories and their child directories with some of the weighting based on their position in the directory structure, I am quite uncertain that this is an actual factor. At one pont, this was a factor but that was before the implementation of Caffeine, Google's current Search Index. In the olden ...


2

When I do a search in Google for "The Matrix Trailer", I get 8 sites that do not follow any of the URL recommendations. 1 that semi follows. 1 That is almost exact to these recommendations. For example, this is IMDB's URL: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0133093/trailers. Doesn't even say "Matrix". But IMDB is an authority on Movies, Actors, etc... My point, ...


1

406 would be incorrect, as the standard defines (Emphasis mine): The resource identified by the request is only capable of generating response entities which have content characteristics not acceptable according to the accept headers sent in the request. So no, 406 is only about the accept header, not query parameters or anything else.


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Assuming the default value is not a bad. There are several ways you could handle search engines: Redirect to remove badly formed or missing parameter values. All of the following could get 301 permanently redirected to /page.html?order=desc: /page.html /page.html?order= /page.html?order=123 Use the canonical meta tag without redirecting. This tells ...


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It would depend on the situation, and cause of the incorrect value, and there isn't really a 'catch-all' for incorrect query string parameter. In your example, I would use a 400, as 123 being entered for order is a completely inappropriate value, but if the query parameter was incorrect from an old link still pointing to my site after I had changed the ...


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For UX it's best to just use default values instead. Your case seems kind of rare. Has it been a real problem in some cases? Thinking out of the box, one solution could be 301 moved permanently reply pointing to the URL with the default value. That would Solve the problem with search engines. Give user direct feedback on the incorrect parameters, actually ...


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A URL is an address used to locate documents. Examples of URLs are: http://example.com/mypage.html ftp://example.com/download.zip mailto:user@example.com file:///home/user/file.txt tel:1-888-555-5555 http://example.com/resource?foo=bar#fragment HTTP is the protocol used to fetch some URLs (the ones that start with http://) from servers. A simple HTTP ...


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Google treats every variation of the query string as a separate URL. When the parameters differ they are technically different URLs. It is appropriate to use 301 permanent redirects because you are redirecting different URLs. Keeping the utc parameters on the URL after the redirect is important for Google Analytics. It will only be able to use them ...



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