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This feature of Apache is known as "MultiViews" and it is handled by the content negotiation module: ...if /some/dir has MultiViews enabled, and /some/dir/foo does not exist, then the server reads the directory looking for files named foo.*, and effectively fakes up a type map which names all those files, assigning them the same media types and ...


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What is the best practise to apply SEO for these to show up in the search engine for their username? You would need to include the username as part of the page title element. Also link to these pages using the username as the anchor text. Including the username (naturally) in the page content will also help. LinkedIn includes the user's name as the ...


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Googlebot will only be able to see one version of your page. If the content uses different keywords, Google will only be able to rank one set of keywords for that URL. As long as you show Googlebot and visitors from the Google search engine the same content, Google won't penalize your site for cloaking. Landing pages for ad campaigns, aren't usually good ...


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The same question is legitimate in case of multivariate tests. Follow this guide: http://searchengineland.com/googles-seo-guide-on-ab-multivariate-testing-130093 The best advice of all is to put a canonical to a page with static content.


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I changed my domain redirects to add utm parameters to the URLs. This causes Google Analytics to treat the traffic as "campaign" traffic rather than direct traffic. When somebody types in my site example.org site they now get redirected to: http://example.com/?utm_campaign=domainnames&utm_medium=domain&utm_source=example.com I built this URL ...


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If you literally only have a few "groups" you want to block then you would do something like: User-agent: * Disallow: /lang/group1 Disallow: /lang/group2 ...and everything else would be allowed. This would work with all robots that obey the original "standard". Or, you could block all groups (group1, group2, etc.) and make an exception for "group3", like: ...


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A URL is a URL. It can have a query string or not. It can have subdirectories or not. But one format is not better than another as far as SEO goes. Search engines can work with all of them equally as well. Having said that, having a URL that clearly organizes and identifies the content of that resource is better than one that doesn't. Remember that users ...


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Could each of your users maintain their own sitemap? If so, you could use a sitemap index. Its intended use is for when your sitemap is too big, I believe, but you could as well list all the sitemaps you expect your users to create. <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <sitemapindex xmlns="http://www.sitemaps.org/schemas/sitemap/0.9"> ...


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First, we have to assume that all of your users want all of their files to be indexed by search engines. Second, we need a method to get the sitemap to Google. Especially in your case, the easiest way is to use robots.txt. Sitemap: http://www.example.com/sitemap.xml Third, you need a sitemap. If you don't already have a way to generate a sitemap for all ...


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A really simple way to get them indexed would be to create a google webmaster tools account, claim your domain and then submit a complete sitemap. Depending on the authority of your site, Google is going to make resource decisions about how much effort to put into spidering your site.


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There are two techniques that you can use: Frame redirects This is a technique where the first domain serves an HTML frameset that hides the other URL. It has some disadvantages: Users may not be able to navigate out of the frameset. Clicking links may not change the URL, even if they navigate to external websites. Users may have a hard time ...


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I strongly suggest you examine the status codes and their meanings. You did not explain why a client (which could be a human or a bot) might request a URL that does not exist but the URL might have a valid "parent" URL. The reasons for unusual situation will likely guide your choices of status codes. The information provided by closetnoc is excellent, and ...


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Here is a run-down of some of the HTTP Status Codes. If you want to know more about HTTP Status Codes, I suggest this page: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_HTTP_status_codes It explains things rather well. A 202 status code is OK. This means that the request was successfully fulfilled. A 301 status code Moved Permanently is a redirect. A 303 status ...


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The URL's you see in your log files are probably generated by a JavaScript coming from an old Internet Explorer. In a modern browser, in JavaScript, if you convert an object to a string and if the Object.prototype.toString() is no not overwritten you obtain: [object Object] But in old version of Internet Explorer like IE8 you just obtain: [object] So ...


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It's most likely an attempt to spam your logs/analytics. Many websites accidentally leave their logs and/or analytics publicly available and as a result crawlers index their contents. Since many log and analytic software turn URLs into hyperlinks these links are valid and can count as backlinks to a site if found by the search engines. Their value is ...


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I disagree with the comment that SEO is extremely complex. Actually, it is common sense stuff. There is no magic, voodoo, special formula, incarnations, specific sequence of buttons and switches, etc. You do not need the voodoo priestess Bloody Mary to come to your house or office. How search engines work is very simple and only a handful of techniques that ...



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