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You need to fire an event (or a fake pageview using trackPageview) after the form has been validated, ie when the content dynamically changes. Do not add this code on submitting the form alone, as that will count any clicks that fail your validation.


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There are two ways to do this - Using Events in Google Analytics, and then configuring the Goal on that Event being fired. In the form URL, add a specific URL parameter which you are sure does not do anything (yes, you read that right). Typical flow would be ... user lands on landing page, submits form, ends up on the same page (except with an additional ...


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The simplest way to do this is to fire an event when the form is submitted. Then in analytics configure a goal based on the triggering of the event. (Event based goals is just another type of goal.)


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Whilst I've no definite answer, there are a few things I've found whilst looking into this which may help narrow it down: The links also appear in Bing and Yahoo, so it has nothing to do with Google. They appear on wikis, Tumblr blogs, Wordpress blogs and other sites, and so they aren't going to be added via an exploit in any particular software. They ...


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This might be from an ad provider that you may have, I have the same issue and the only possible place where it comes from is from an adprovider injecting some malware through the javascript codes.


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You should ask Namecheap support if you can set up the forwarding that way with their service. If they cannot do that, then you have to make the redirect with your own web server.


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You might want the href to point to the root of your website instead of the current page. That is not forbidden. But, I am not sure that you could point to another website's page. And if you can, this would be equivalent to misleading a user in having him believe that he/she liked the page he/she clicked on, when in fact he liked another page. If Facebook ...


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Does this hurt SEO? They are all gonna have different URLS The short answer is yes, especially if there are many menus and sub-menus. Since all your pages will have a different URL, but nearly same content, they will be considered as near duplicate content (that is low value/quality for the end user). The solution is simple, pick one URL and use ...


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This will not directly hurt your SEO rankings. But consider this, other than the page content, you now have two pages "competing" for the same terms. You might want to manually help your page names out in cases like this. For example 2014-june-weather-update and 2013-june-weather-update would likely help users and SE alike to distinguish what your pages are ...


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It's not about SEO - using spaces (or other unsafe characters) in a URL is bad practise full stop. The original reason given for this was.... Characters can be unsafe for a number of reasons. The space character is unsafe because significant spaces may disappear and insignificant spaces may be introduced when URLs are transcribed or typeset or ...


2

Replace spaces with hyphens in URL's without a doubt. They are more readable otherwise URL's will be encoded in the browser like:- example.com/category%20name/article%20name.html It's more friendly for search engines and humans like:- example.com/category-name/article-name.html You can accomplish replacing spaces with hyphens by using the php function ...


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No, this will not cause SEO issues. It is very common and normal for URLs to be similar as often times the only difference between URLs in an ID number of some kind. What matters is the content of these pages are different. It's when that starts to be very similar that you will run into issues.


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It depends on the implementation of the URL shortener in question. If implemented in an SEO friendly way, then using a URL shortener will not hurt your SEO efforts compared to direct linking. For a URL shortener to be SEO friendly, it should: Use 301 permanent redirects not 302 temporary redirects framesets meta refresh Allow crawlers to access it ...


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It depends on the implementation of the URL shortener in question. If implemented in an SEO friendly way, then using a URL shortener will not hurt your SEO efforts compared to direct linking. For a URL shortener to be SEO friendly, it should: Use 301 permanent redirects not 302 temporary redirects framesets meta refresh Allow crawlers to access it ...


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While Google can be quite forgiving, the Google Scholar experience and citations allows Google to recognize this scenario natively. This means that content is not read/understood in a linear fashion any more (since 2008) and that similar chunks of data are easily compared between pages and sites. While any negative effect might be argued, I do know that ...


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The issue was not related to Nginx setup, instead it was a setting to enable SEF in Joomla's database. Disabling SEF stopped the issue from occurring. A restore to local OS X server did not show the issue after initial installation, it occurred however after a Debian installation.


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I once had the same problem, which I solved by adding the following lines to my .htaccess file: php_flag display_startup_errors off php_flag display_errors off php_flag html_errors off Also check that your php.ini is fine.


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While browsers can automatically make the conversion from spaces to encoded versions, you should ensure that your server software outputs correctly encoded URLs. Not all browsers / bots can do the encoding properly. If you do not have a CMS, you should encode the URLs in your HTML content. Best way is to restrict to not using URLs with special characters. ...


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Browsers will automatically encode URL's with spaces, assuming you have linked to the file properly. Create a file on your server called test one.html link to it or simply load it directly in your browser using spaces in the URL bar. http://www.example.com/test one.html It will become test%20one.html It's not and ideal way of naming or linking to files ...


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Googlebot uses heuristics to find what could be URLs on your site. One place that Googlebot looks is in your JavaScript. If you have JavaScript code like var a = "site/"; Googlebot may decide that the site/ is a relative URL that it should try to follow. Google expects to get 404 errors from this most of the time, so your site is doing nothing wrong. ...


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When an iFrame is used in a page, it sends a referer (sic) HTTP header of the page that it was included in. You could configure your server to check that the referrer is the correct page for your URL. Alternately, you could use JavaScript to check it using document.referrer. See: ...


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Each W3C standard offers stable URIs for different maturity levels and versions. The HTML5 specification has an URI which always points to the most recent version: http://www.w3.org/TR/html5/ Currently, it’s a "Last Call Working Draft", and this version has the URI: http://www.w3.org/TR/2014/WD-html5-20140617/ You can link to each element and attribute ...


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This is because of caching. The internet works by IP adressess, but people don't work like that, so we've got domainnames. A domainname is a alias for an IP address (simple put). If you go to example.com, the browser needs the ip address. It gets that of DNS server (Domain Name), which translates the domainname to an ipaddress. If your browser has to ask ...


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This one is easy. Option 2. What? You want more? Okay. If you insist! In your first example, and outside of the domain name, the only thing that would really count for keywords in that URL/URI is the parameter (after the &). In your second example, the entire URL/URI counts for keywords. It is more effective/efficient. However, using parameters can be ...


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Given these options your I believe the best choice would be to use the second format: example.com/<root-category-name>/<product-name> Now let's go into why this may be the best option... You said that the most important keywords are the root categories. This being the case those keywords should be closest to the root as they are the most ...


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You can setup Google Analytics to exclude based on the referrer domain. See this for more: Google Analytics - Exclude referrers Also, you could block these based on the referrer as well via your .htaccess or Apache conf file, like this: RewriteCond %{HTTP_REFERER} ^.*\.doubleclick\.net.*$ [NC] RewriteRule ^(.*)$ - [F] (rather than blocking multiple IP ...


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This simply means Googlebot could not search (crawl) the URLs defined in the provided sitemap. Failure can be caused by a number of reasons. Some that I have found include: Sitemap is syntactically incorrect. Use the W3 Validator to check. Sitemap is incorrectly listing URLs. Site was down/offline. Site was slow and their crawler timed out. Security ...


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This seems like a plugin gone wrong issue. I would use something like Xenu's Link Sleuth http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xenu%27s_Link_Sleuth and take a base line look at your site. Then disable all plugins and crawl again. If the offending links are in the base line but not in the results without plugins then one of your plugins is definitely causing ...


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The question focuses a lot on what Google is doing but to me it appears that your fundamental problem not really Google specific at all. Why do these names, which you clearly don't seem to want people to use, even exist in DNS? If it is intentional that these names exist and resolve, why are you serving your actual site when people (and Googlebot) connect ...



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