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0

No, you should be ok. It won't have a specific impact on your SEO.


2

The first virtual host directive is the default "catch all." Any unrecognized host names get handled by whichever virtual host directive comes first. The solution to your problem is to create a default virtual host directive that prints out an error. I have one that I use. I've previously posted it in this answer 404 Not Found -- Hostname Not ...


1

You don't need to contact anybody. If you setup 301 redirects in your .htaccess file to the new pages correctly there will be no issues with duplicate content.


0

If you don't use www, then I think you'll have a problem with having clients sending extra unnecessary data when fetching resources that don't require cookies such as images unless you use a completely new domain name for your resources other than the HTML itself. See: http://www.phpied.com/www-vs-no-www-and-cookies/


0

As long as you have a 301 redirect from the www subdomain you're fine.


3

If you take all the right steps, there isn't a lot to worry about. 301 all existing pages (This is the major step!) Set all you canonical tags right (This is your 2nd most important step) You will lose a little PageRank for the redirect, but we're talking minimal amount here, nothing a little time won't fix. Just read up on how to migrate sites (which ...


0

would /super-cool-outreach-research-education-division/carnival-party-robots/basket-weaving-development be more SEO friendly than /scored/crp/bw. Each acronym falls into three different kinds. Google searches for keywords in URLs, so if your acronyms are not commonly used or could be interpreted in different ways, it would hamper Google's algorithms ...


1

All four of your URLs are different for SEO: http://www.example.com/product http://www.example.com/product/ http://www.example.com/product?source=googleps http://www.example.com/product/?source=googleps It doesn't matter which one of those four you use, but you have to pick one and use it consistently. Both slashes and parameters create new URLs to ...


1

Regarding the SEO, I wouldn't expect it to be an issue, as Google have enough common sense to realise that, if the two URLs you have shown returned the same content, that for all practical purposes the URLs the same to a human. In fact some webmasters/developers will write brief rewrite rules to append or remove the slash because "it looks nicer". These ...


1

I'm always setup 301 redirect from www.example.com domain to example.com. This code helps you: server { server_name www.example.com; return 301 $scheme://example.com$request_uri; }


2

I would think this would be the expected behaviour would be this instead: www.example.com -> example.com www.example.com/test.html -> example.com/test.html That's a good idea. Just map the last parts of the URL (particularly folder and file) from the old domain to the new domain. You can easily use mod-rewrite if you have apache. Just make an ...


3

The HTTP status code 301 is named "Moved Permanently": The requested resource has been assigned a new permanent URI and any future references to this resource SHOULD use one of the returned URIs. So the resource (i.e., your document) would stay the same, it just gets a new URI. As your front page http://example.com/ is (usually) not the same resource ...


2

Google will be happy with either link, but it will likely show the resulting link in the search engine results so users don't have to be transferred to a redirect when clicking on a result. In your case, if you want mysite.com to appear in the results pages instead of mysite.com/blog to appear, then you need to have mysite.com point to content instead of a ...


0

There are a few things you need to keep in mind here: URL Length - you should take a look at your inventory of acronyms to determine the average and longest lengths for these URLs. If they are normally on the shorter end then you're good to spell out but if they are more often than not longer then you should consider a different approach. Directory ...


2

It seems you have two pages/URLs that show the same post. Ordinarily I would have suggested removing one of these "permalinks" in WordPress - that URL would then return a 404. However, it would seem that these two permalinks have existed for a while(?) and have been indexed and possibly linked to. So, it might be better (at least in the short term) to 301 ...


-1

You may have: Duplicate title tags Duplicate content Duplicate versions of the home page I'd like to give credit to my source: http://blog.raventools.com/the-most-common-seo-mistakes/


1

I believe it's from the ShareThis plugin when you enable the ‘Measure copy & shares of your site’s URLs’ option.



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