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If you can catch them, and you can find a matching new result, I suggest you header like this (in php, maybe you want something else): header("HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently"); header("Location: /new_location_here"); That way, if you have /some/TESTPAGE with some PR value, and you link it to /new/TESTPAGE via a 301, you move the PR value with it, instead ...


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Breadcrumbs do not effect SEO. Sorry. They are only mark-up that can appear in the search engine response page (SERP). In that respect, they may help click-through rates. And to my recollection, I only recall clicking on one ever. So to answer your question, make them what you want. Where they can effect SEO is as a link. Just think of it as an internal ...


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Wordpress, by defalt, WILL allow you to do this. Open your wp-config.php file and add the following line: define( 'UPLOADS', '/media/' ); Change /media/ to whatever directory you want to use. A word of caution: If you already have media uploaded, the path to that media is stored in the database. Changing the path will not update the stored paths, and ...


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There is no advantage whatsoever. Well, there may be a very small advantage regarding loading time if you page has many images, since you would be saving some KB on text. Although, there would be a slight more work to do on the server/browser side. Each relative link has to be converted to a full canonical link that identifies a resource, so a relative ...


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I personally don't think this is very important at all. This seems like more of a architectural issue or problem depending on your site and is very unlikely to effect the SEO of your website. Here is a list of issues that could effect your website with regards to images. Images are downloading the content from multiple different websites thus increasing ...


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Wordpress by default will not allow you to do that. If you wish to change the url of uploads folder, you will have to use an additional plugin. This plugin will give you the following option so that you can modify your upload path: Here's another plugin (haven't tested this one personally) that will let you do the same thing.


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Google Webmasters also explains why the URLs are still indexed with their YouTube video. It takes a good while for the actual removal process of the old links to happen. Also, you have to remember, Google is indexing, re-indexing, and deleting records from their Search Engine all of the time at a massive rate already, but there is trillions upon trillions ...


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I've had a quick test and this should do the trick: RewriteEngine on RewriteRule ^([0-9]+)/([0-9]+)$ /date/$1/$2 [R=301,L] You may also need to exclude this from the redirect to the index.php page by adding RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !^/(date) [NC] so it should look like this # BEGIN WordPress <IfModule mod_rewrite.c> RewriteEngine On ...


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If ent.example.com does a 301 redirect to www.example.com/ent/ then all is fine, you loose only a tiny bit of page rank. You may also use rel=canonical in the header of both pages and add a single url that is relevant. It's really up to you, have a look at how Google looks at 301 vs rel=canonical. More info about any further SEO related questions can be ...


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Google does not view multiple city domains highly. Matt Cutts has highlighted this scenario multiple times as something that you need to be careful about. Here is an example of him doing so: Cutts said if you have multiple sites you want to link together you need to have a very good reason to be linking them together, otherwise it will come across as ...


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If it is the same site with shared content then you should use http://thisproduct.com/miami/ :) If they are different sites with different content, then use different domains (Some hosts allow you to have one server for multiple domains) With the 2012 changes Google will cluster sites in it's eyes depending on how they are interlinked, this means that it ...


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Sorry for the late answer, but I hope this still helps you or someone. The reasoning is simple, <brandName> is a dynamic URL slug, brand is a static URL slug. When a slug is dynamic then all the slugs are expected to identify some dynamic resource, for example your brand, when a slug is static then it specifies a section/category/slice of the site. ...


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The "U" in URL stands for "Unique" (some say Uniform) which should be a good clue here :) Best case scenario is that you split any "link popularity" between 2 different URLs. Imagine half the visitors to the page using one URL and half using the other URL. Each URL only gets 50% of the traffic, 50% of any popularity "score" that Google might apply. To that ...


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It sounds like you just mapped your domain to your appspot site. You have to set up appspot if you want to use a custom domain. https://developers.google.com/appengine/docs/domain


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I dont think you can register a trademark and then claim ownership of previously registered domain names, (though obviously you would need proper legal advice.) Looking at the domain name dispute policy http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uniform_Domain-Name_Dispute-Resolution_Policy A complainant in a UDRP proceeding must establish three elements to ...


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It depends on some factors. First of them is: Is piggybank.com in the same branch as you are? If it is clearly something completely different, it might turn into a problem. Then, is your name (now piggybank) some general word? Like Apple (Those lawyers have pulled some magic). If it is something less broad, something specific, that will increase your odds. ...


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Input %26 in place of the & The important term in this situation is: url encoding


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Without going into the actual mechanism in details, basically the DNS server that resolves the abc.com and xyz.com domains to one IP address that both domains share will give this shared IP address back to the web browser. The web browser then makes an HTTP request to this IP address and eventually reaches the webserver hosting these two (and perhaps many ...


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Web client, usually a browser, opens a TCP socket to the server. The server software accepts the connection without knowing the specific site requested, and waits for an HTTP request to happen. The client sends the request, mainly composed of HTTP headers. One of these headers is the Host: example.com header, at this point the server is aware of the right ...


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The simple answer is, the web server software looks at the hostname in the HTTP request and uses that to determine which website to serve. For example, Apache has the NameVirtualHost configuration option which controls this behaviour. You can find a detailed explanation of how this process works in its documentation: ...


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It depends on what sort of "no root page" you've got. My personal website originally returned "404" for / (and common variations such as /index.html or /index.php). Google had no trouble finding things using inbound links to actual pages, but the Cuil crawler couldn't handle it: I'd see a request for whichever inbound link it was following, a request for ...


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From an SEO point of view, no, it's not a problem for your page to have no root. Search engine's index URLs, it doesn't matter if they're in subfolders or not. However, from a user-experience point of view you really shouldn't assume that anybody who lands on the root of your site wants to see the English version. Let's say a Japanese user tells one of ...


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If the root (/) 301 redirect to /en/, Google will most probably consider your homepage is http://www.example.com/en/ and there is no problem not to have a root (/) page. Regarding Google guidelines for multilingual sites, you can use this method to separate languages on your site.


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I completely agree to all the answers put above. Just adding that one of the reasons why extensions are hidden in URL is to security. Putting it simply, if you don't expose the extension in the URL, it is little hard to figure out the technology on which the application has been built. So lets say a page in made in PHP and the extension is not hidden, then a ...


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I wish I could do this, but the Answer which I got from the Developers Community for the API is that your page is an 'object'. URL, Comments, and Likes are fixed to that object. The best bet is to use a 301 Redirect to the new page. The Facebook crawler maintains that object for the future. As the link which bybe shared in the comments, the instructions ...


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Canonical is the correct way as suggested above. I would also remove this parameter from Google webmaster tools (canonical is not a directive but rather a suggestion as far as search engines are concerned, also - removing the parameters from WMT is a speedier solution). In WMT navigate to Crawl > URL Parameters > Configure URL parameters, then edit the ...


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Use canonical URLs for your content pages. Then whenever Google crawls or find a link to one with the referrer in the query string it will automatically associate it with the canonical URL. The canonical URL will be the URL Google shows in the search results. It also prevents your site from appearing to have duplicate content.


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If you know before time when this page (job advert) will expire then consider including an unavailable_after META tag (or X-Robots-Tag HTTP response header) to inform search engines (ie. Google) before time: <meta name="googlebot" content="unavailable_after: 2014-Mar-30 18:00:00 GMT"> Reference: Robots Exclusion Protocol: now with even more ...


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People forget that SEO is about more than just search engines. It is about conversion too. In a proper world, if a page does not exist, a 404 or better yet, a 410 error should be returned. However, that does not help conversion and site usability. Here, a 301 redirect could be used to help capture valuable potential and redirect them to a page that will ...


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I when ahead and submitted my site maps to Google with Double urlencoding. In other words, if a URL contained a urlencoded character, such as %26, this became %2526 My 404 errors are now down from 14,000 to 10,000 and are still dropping.


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Use this: RedirectMatch 301 Users_PasswordReminder\.aspx http://example.com


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Please browse through http://magento.stackexchange.com/questions/4169/remove-unnesessary-url-rewrites once. This URL should help you in removing duplicate/unnecessary URL.


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Or you could just use preg_replace with urldecode in the URL construction to retain special characters in the URL such as what are currently in your sitemap. preg_replace("/%u([0-9a-f]{3,4})/i","&#x\\1;",urldecode($[attach_necessary_object_here])); This way the URL's would be:- example.com/here/there



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