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Browsers do not try one protocol and then fall back to the other. The browser will use which ever protocol it is linked to. If that protocol isn't supported, the user will get an error. If you want to force users to use one protocol, you can redirect from one to the other. For example, to force secure connection on your site use the following rewrite ...


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// basically means that the a resource will be requested in the same protocol, thus if someone is browsing httpS://yourwebsite.com, and you include a stylesheet like //yourwebsite.com/style.css, it will load httpS://yourwebsie.com/style.css. If you request resources from http when the page is https, the browser may give an error. To answer your questions: ...


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There are two things you have to keep in your mind: The easier to remember, the better you have to be able to remove each part in the url without breaking it This makes your 3 examples rather easy: A http://www.example.com/category/sub-category/sub-sub-category/article/ID B http://www.example.com/ID/category/sub-category/sub-sub-category/article C ...


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It's not strictly a DNS setting. You would have to change the settings on your web server. You will need to have the friendsmusic.com DNS A record point to the IP Address that mydomain.com/friend is hosted at. Then assuming you are using an Apache web server you can go into the configuration file example: /etc/apache2/apache2.conf and create a mod_rewrite ...


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The only solution I can think of here is a server alias. A server alias points to your domain name on web server level. It can send the user somewhere without the URL changing But you must note: the domain should be hosted at your hosting company you should redirect all links to example.php/. Note the /, otherwise the real URL will be shown. It's a ...


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The characters [ and ] are not allowed in the query component of a URI. If you want to have these brackets displayed, you’d have to percent-encode them, i.e.: http://example.com/search/?Search%5Bterm%5D=go&Search%5BStore%5D%5Baddress%5D%5Bcity%5D=Oslo&Search%5BStore%5D%5Baddress%5D%5Bcountry%5D=NO Your SEO question doesn’t seem to be so much ...


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From SEO perspective it does not matter which one you use. Either approach will not effect you SEO directly. It might effect your CTR because the URLs look messy. When it comes to SEO, the issue here is not really about which way to output the URL's (like your way better) but what to do with the generated pages. You have two options: 1. If you want your ...


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Here is Google's position from an archived live chat session (the link is now dead): *Does inconsistent capitalization of URLs cause duplicate content issues and dilution of page rank? For example www.site.com/abc vs www.site.com/Abc. On Windows hosts, these are the same page, but are different pages on Unix hosts. JohnMu: Hi John, based on the ...


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Two of the most widely used web servers have very different settings for case sensitivity of URLs by default. Whether or not your URLs are case sensitive is likely a function of which you are using: Microsoft IIS - case insensitive URLs - shows the same content regardless of capitalization. Apache HTTPD Server - case sensitive URLs - gives a 404 not ...


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RFC 3986 6.2.2.1 defines URIs as case-insensitive, so it is not a good idea to make them case-sensitive like wordpress.org does.


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Each URL on your site has its own PageRank. So http://example.com/?id=344 will have separate PageRank from http://example.com/ and both will have separate PageRank from http://example.com/page.html. In many cases a URL parameter will not cause the page shown to change, or will cause a 404 not found error. Either of those may cause the link juice ...


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You can choose any URL structure, thereby making sure that they are clean enough to understand. Personally, I would prefer location first because i would be knowing the location where i am going and then the restaurants and i have checked many of your competitors are also using the same structure.


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Search engines will rank the keyword nearest to the domain as the most important, and the keyword nearest to the domain should be the one that's most important to the user. As such, given you're saying in theory you're comparable to Yelp, then my position is that location should be first.


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In your case, it does not matter which order you choose regarding SEO. To make indexation more efficient, don't forget to include the location in your title meta tag. It helps.


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If you are looking at structures like this it is really a case of which type of taxonomy works best for you. I would usually default to putting the L2 (category) landing page as the first part of the structure. So if you have a "Restaurants" page go from /restaurants/location/; if you have a "New York" page then go /new-york/restaurant/. If you have ...


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I don't think there is necessarily a right or wrong answer here, but thinking about it logically, if i'm looking for a restaurant, I would most likely be looking for one within a certain local area. So with that in mind, I'd say www.example.com/new-york/restaurants/abc-restaurant would be the most logical and user friendly approach. You might want to ...



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