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4

Sure it will work, You can consider any of the one link as canonical parent (Means original). and other one as duplicate. If the url is different in parameter or its order is not an issue. You can just point one url as its original, SEO Crawlers will identify that. something like <link href="http://shoes.com/compare/adidas/vs/nike/" rel="canonical" ...


4

You can block URLs that contain ?l= from being indexed by search engine robots by using the following robots.txt directive: Disallow: /*?l= The / indicates the root directory, and * is a wildcard for anything up to ?l=, followed by anything after it.


3

Sometimes parameter values completely change the content of the page; sometimes they only reflect a re-ordering; sometimes they do not change the content at all but reflect a referral or tracking campaign or some other information. By default Bing understands each unique URL as a unique page, which can lead to "duplicate content" being indexed and ...


3

If you wanted to append all the query parameters you would want to use $_SERVER['QUERY_STRING'] to extract them from the current URL, you would then append this to the location of the redirect: header("Location: http://www.New-Website.com?".$_SERVER['QUERY_STRING']); If you only wanted to pass certain variables, you could get them individually and then ...


2

I recommend that you add the canonical form of the URL to each web page: <link rel="canonical" href="http://mysite.com/article/42/"> You may also with to do a permanent redirect to the longer URL if you get a request to the shorter one (with the L flag if using mod_rewrite, and before you do the internal rewrite to index.php). Secondly, I suggest ...


2

You can, if you are willing to add some additional code to your website. You need to call _setAllowAnchor(true) and add the parameters to a hash query. Here's a proof of concept: <script type="text/javascript"> var _gaq = _gaq || []; _gaq.push(['_setAccount', 'UA-XXXXXXX-XX']); _gaq.push(['_setAllowAnchor', 'true']); // tell GA to read params from ...


2

file:/// will open a file on your drive or network drive using the OS. When using http:// you're telling the browser that this is a hypertext link to a file located on the Internet, not locally. You're likely seeing the parameters after several tries because IE is just saving your history. Also, having a ? in the URL implies you have some server-side ...


2

This isn't really about Google, it's about the specification for URLs - lower and uppercase are different URLs. This applies to query string parameters as well. If Google knows of 2 different URL variants, it treats them initially as 2 separate URLs. However, if it turns out they have the same content, Google is generally smart enough to count them as the ...


2

All permalink will be index by SE, exclude permalink have a symbol ?, =, and &. User-agent: * Disallow: Disallow: /cgi-bin/ Disallow: /*?* Disallow: /*? Disallow: /*=* Disallow: /*= Disallow: /*&* Disallow: /*& Allow: / Will blocking all permalink format like /main?l=de_DE or /main?l=Any_Value_Here, excluding /main?l=fr_FR form SE. ...


2

Answering this as maybe it will help someone in future. Basically we appear to have inadvertently added code that renders different markup conditionally on the user-agent (or 'cloaking' to it's friends). There are add-ons for Chrome and Firefox that allow you test this The version of the page rendered for; Googlebot/2.1 (+http://www.google.com/bot.html) ...


2

Having different styles of URLs for different parts of your website is not an SEO problem. As long as your URLs uniquely identify content and are not spammy, they are fine with search engines. The only place that I could see this becoming an issue is if you tried to apply rules to clean up your URLs. In that case you might need to write different rules ...


2

You don't want to redirect them - that will probably break your site's functionality. There are various means of managing parameters for SEO purposes; since you mention Google Webmaster Tools, you may wish to look at their parameter management tool. In brief, you can instruct Google how to handle different parameters on your site, e.g., index them, index a ...


2

The default setting for URL Parameters is "let Google decide". That setting is fine 99% of the time. In your case where some parameters specify the content, Googlebot will automatically assume that already. You don't need to tell Googlebot that these URL parameters make unique pages, that is the way it works by default. The only time that I use the URL ...


1

There could be many issues. First of all without the real URLs and a lock in your Webmaster Central we could not be sure what the exact issue is. May be you have an wrong implementation of the canonical tag or other problems like, additional noindex, other indexing issues... Beyond that small/fresh/penalized sites will be crawled less often and it actually ...


1

Well firstly you need to determine whether you want all these URL variations with query parameters to be indexed in Google. For example, if they create duplicate content, then the norm for ecommerce websites is to NOINDEX the URL's with these query parameters. Within URL Parameters in Google WMT, you can instruct Google what to do with URL's with specific ...


1

Use canonical URLs for your content pages. Then whenever Google crawls or find a link to one with the referrer in the query string it will automatically associate it with the canonical URL. The canonical URL will be the URL Google shows in the search results. It also prevents your site from appearing to have duplicate content.


1

It's possible by using server side redirection AND by following the instructions on this Google reference page: https://developers.google.com/analytics/devguides/collection/gajs/methods/gaJSApiCampaignTracking Please note that the _setCamp... functions must be called before this code: _gaq.push(['_trackPageview']);


1

If you redirect, it will not preserve that information. You could store this information in a cookie before redirecting and then read it from a cookie. I worked with a website that did that for URL canonicalization. It works, but it is a pain to implement and some data gets lost or truncated.


1

I would rewrite your URLs so that the language is a directory: /main /fr_FR/main That has two advantages: Robots.txt can be used to block certain languages but not other (without resorting to wildcards) You can add directories to Google webmaster tools and change the geographic targeting of the directories (in that case it should be geo targeted to ...


1

Stack Exchange sites redirect when the URL is truncated, or the title of the post has change. For example the URL for this page is: /questions/50697/why-google-does-not-fetch-some-get-parameters-in-url. You can check that both /questions/50697/ and /questions/50697/some-other-title redirect to the correct canonical URL. If you are not doing "URL ...


1

To Google, http://www.example.com/doc/list/44444/name/ is a different URL from http://www.example.com/doc/list/44445/name/. If it finds links to both of them it will crawl both of them and index both of them. Google automatically assumes that any difference in a URL makes the page different and this it should crawl and index all different variations. ...


1

Setup your Google Analytics to exclude the jsessionid http://cutroni.com/blog/2006/09/21/google-analytics-configuration-mistake-2-query-string-variables/ To force GA to skip certain query string parameters when processing we enter the unwanted parameters in the ‘Exclude URL Query Parameters:’ filed in the ‘Main Website Profile Information’ section. ...


1

I'd scan the source of your site with grep in linux or totalcommander in windows for any instance of di or since you know the functions that are generating the image URL search the files containing those functions first. Check if it's happening only for specific images in your application if so which images and what parts of your app are they being used in. ...


1

What the bots dislike most are duplicates. The first thing I'd do is add: <link rel="canonical" ... /> links in the <head> section of your various e-commerce pages and of course review and update your sitemaps.xml file. See: About rel="canonical"


1

The rel values next and prev are not only useful to search engines. They denote the relationship type, i.e. how the link target is related to the current page. So, why would you want to omit them? They have no influence on (de)indexing if you block the pages with robots.txt resp. robots-meta. You wouldn’t stop using semantic HTML for pages to be deindexed ...


1

"Effect": "None" doesn't mean that it isn't working. That means that the parameter has no effect on the output of the page. If you set "Crawl" to "Representative URL" then "Effect" automatically becomes "None" (and stays that way forever). If you set "Crawl" to "Every URL", then "Effect" becomes "Specifies". You will know it is working when Googlebot ...


1

The purpose of the url parameters feature is to let you help Google identify URL parameters which affect (or don't affect) the content on the page. So in your case the URL parameter you'd setup would be category. You don't need to tell it possible values for that parameter, or the page filename, Googlebot will work that out for itself as it crawls your site. ...


1

Whilst I've no definite answer, there are a few things I've found whilst looking into this which may help narrow it down: The links also appear in Bing and Yahoo, so it has nothing to do with Google. They appear on wikis, Tumblr blogs, Wordpress blogs and other sites, and so they aren't going to be added via an exploit in any particular software. They ...


1

It may be Googlebot trying to access jQuery/Javascript and crawl everything it can. There was a recent post on here of someone asking for help because Googlebot was crawling invalid URL's on their site. John M replied about how Googlebot may be looking for more URL's to crawl from scripts on their site. He works for Google Webmaster Tools. You pretty much ...


1

How new is your domain? It may very well be this was a popular query on the old domain and thus you are still getting "visitors". Does this map to a valid page or a 404? If you are getting a lot of hits there and it's a 404, then I would remap it (use a .htaccess) to your homepage or something.



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