Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

Those two final statements are big assumptions. For example, we have a web app that uses AJAX to its literal meaning - we use it for loading XML documents on the fly. If the XML document does not have the correct content-encoding header (or is lacking one at all), then any unicode characters (smartquotes, long dashes, even some special whitespace and the ...


6

The CE mark, or CE marking as it is now officially called, has not been encoded as a character. Thus, the only way to include it in an HTML document is to use graphics of some kind, such as an image or drawing on a canvas. The CE marking is a specific graphic to be printed or otherwise permanently included in products according to EU legislation. It has no ...


5

Character references like З have been part of HTML for a long, long time, and they are frequently used for various reasons. Google is known to support them (as you say), and it would be very odd for it to drop the support. So from the SEO point of view, there is no need to get rid of such references. The main problem with character references is ...


4

dmsnell's answer about using HTML entities is fine, but this issue can usually be fixed by making sure you are using the proper UTF-8 throughout the entire page generation and serving to users. For example, if your data is stored in a database, make sure all the text fields use UTF-8 encoding. In MySQL you will also need to run a query SET NAMES utf8 once ...


4

Alright, after some digging, here is what I have found (and it works). IndexOptions Charset=UTF-8 Cheers!


4

It's only a guess, but one possibility is that someone else is hotlinking to your files with some broken code. I know that whenever I've had dodgy requests to my sites I've always been able to track it down to someone else's borked link. (It's really irritating that spiders don't include Http-Referer headers to make it easier for us to identify the source of ...


4

You might struggle to find a unicode character to represent "view", but you'll find plenty of web font based icon sets with an eye or view concept. For example, Font Awesome – the icon web font used in Twitter Bootstrap – has an icon called 'icon-eye-open' that might do the trick. Font Awesome is licensed under CC-BY-3 (you can use it for free as long as ...


3

Have you tried simply entering the punycode version of the domain names? This is what is actually used when DNS entry is resolved.


3

It doesn't matter whether you're using Unicode, but only whether Adsense supports your language. Looking at the list of supported languages Sinhala is not there, unfortunately, so you won't be able to use Adsense. Update: sorry misread the question. However, for Adwords the policy appears to be the same. See Adwords supported languages and Language ...


3

These are called gremlins and they are usually caused because whichever program is putting the quotes in is using the actual pretty / curly / smart quotes instead of the proper HTML entities. The fonts don't display right or don't have those characters in them and instead produced the funny symbol. See this great article from A List Apart on non-quote ...


2

Primarily, vectors symbols should be denoted using bold italic, according to the international standard on mathematical notations, ISO 80000-2. This is easy in HTML: <b><i>v</i></b> In theory, you could alternatively use special characters like U+1D497 MATHEMATICAL BOLD ITALIC SMALL V (which can be written as &#x1d497; in ...


2

I found this: 2v&#8407;+w&#8407;=0&#8407; 2v⃗+w⃗=0⃗ It would be nice if there were a more intuitive way to do it. But at least it works.


2

It all depends on whether or not the TLD supports unicode. TLDs that do will be converted, TLDs that don't, won't. In my browser (FireFox 3.6) neither of them stay in unicode, they both get converted to punycode, which I would suspect is the correct behaviour for .me


2

I don't know that there are any. WordPress and Drupal, two popular examples, both have modules to account for translation into Korean. You might also be interested in the book CJKV Information Processing, reputedly a great book on Asian-language i18n.


2

There have been a variety of attempts to be sneaky with titles and snippets by using special characters, so search engines have generally worked to sanitize what they show there. Sometimes this results in characters being removed (eg stars, arrows, etc), sometimes it can even result in search engines creating a title of their own (Google sometimes does that ...


2

No, there are no significant downsides to serving HTML documents as UTF-8 with BOM. Statements to the contrary are still common, but they are based on misunderstanding. Some very early browsers, which you now might find in a museum if you are very lucky, rendered a BOM literally in some encoding. Even in our times, PHP software still cannot handle BOM ...


2

Part of the advantage of UTF-8 is that software that only knows about ASCII can still read the files. When a byte order mark is present in the file, some of software that expects ASCII text may complain that the file is "binary". Modern web browsers are all capable of consuming UTF-8 with a BOM. I would still recommend omitting the BOM because it makes ...


1

URL length has little impact on SEO. Google does not appear to have direct signals in their algorithm to prefer shorter URLs. There are two possible SEO considerations with long URLs: Long URLs often get truncated when posted into forums and emails. Long URLs cause pages to be larger and take longer to download. Especially when there are hundreds of ...


1

As you know, URL Length is important for SEO. Citation needed. There is no particular hard limit for URI length. URIs should be kept manageable for usability (eg: can you easily copy-and-paste it? could you type it if you needed to?), and there is no gain in packing them with irrelevant keywords, but you should not be worrying about truncating titles ...


1

The default arrow is a bit large for use as an over-arrow but you can do <math xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML"> <mover> <mi>v</mi> <mo mathsize="50%">&rarr;</mo> </mover> </math> which renders reasonably well in firefox (gecko) and chrome (webkit) on windows, can't test iOS.


1

It'll mess with the results, here is an example search for the word anxw the English version of the Greek word anxious Then search ἄγχω which is using Greek letters Now search anxω which uses the Greek letter omega in the end Just a random example of how the results appear different once you change a single letter. I would personally use the English ...


1

I wouldn't rely too much on special characters in my title or meta description. It might work in the short term and it might even improve your click-through-rate (CTR) for a while, but IMO it's the type of thing that Google and other search engines could phase out over time if they see it getting abused. However, as far as a format for a higher CTR goes, ...


1

Bluehost seems to do what you need.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible