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31

I've created the following scale to help give some feel of what "a lot" might mean. It uses estimates of unique monthly visitors for popular websites to create a high point, then works down from there. The "what's a lot of traffic?" scale (monthly uniques): "A right royal load" = 1 billion+ e.g. Google "A mother load" = 500 million+ e.g. ...


24

Provide content that people value, and the links will come naturally. This is the slow, free way to drive traffic over time. If you have some particularly valuable or interesting content, submit it to news organizations that relate to your content (Slashdot is a good example for technology content). If they pick up your content it will help to drive ...


20

I've just broken down Nicks answer for <100,000 uniques as I think it needs expanding a bit :) 50,000 unique monthly visitors (a pop) A healthy amount of visitors and showing the signs of value 25,000 unique monthly visitors (a buzz) Healthy interest 10,000 unique monthly visitors (a fizz) Signs of potential for small sites 2,500 unique monthly ...


15

You have no control over whether or not a website, or anything, goes viral. Going viral is a phenomena where something gets insanely popular for (usually) no apparent reason. Anyone advertising a product/service/website hopes their ad and product go viral but it happening is out of their control. It's more a freak occurance then a created result. How you ...


14

One other thing to note, the links within Wikipedia are rel="nofollow" so you won't get much if any SEO value out of the links. Your only real value is people following the links. And again, as @Srirangan said please don't do it at the cost of degrading the Wikipedia page's usefulness. If you do, you are most likely going to get your changes removed ...


12

When you're at bottom, I believe the only way to move yourself up is to outwork the competition. It's not the fun or easy answer. But when money isn't readily available, you have to overcome your limitations by working harder. To translate this idea, it's time for --you-- to start writing, or to find people who can help at no cost. If you have a great ...


12

I think the issue may be due to "trust" - search engines usually treat subdomains differently from the main domain, so if you moved some pages to a different domain or subdomain then essentially you are "starting from scratch". Whereas if you use subdirectories the domain is already trusted and pages may be indexed more quickly. If your traffic is ...


12

While you seem to have solved your problem, you may still experience this same phenomenon going forward. 301 Redirects are Google's recommended way to move content, however they have at least some decaying effect on Page Rank. Google's Matt Cutts was interviewed in March 2010 by Stone Temple Consulting. From the full transcript of his interview: Eric Enge: ...


11

I recommend listening to Podcast #64 of Stackoverflow where they discuss their disappointment in Adsense. I also tried it on my personal blog where I get only about 50 visitors per day on the high end. In that case it's definitely not worth it and after a few months I ended up taking it down. From the Stackoverflow podcast mentioned above: On the ...


10

Maybe, depends on your definition of "major traffic". Please don't spam Wikipedia, please don't impact the quality of the pages.


10

It sounds like the copyrighted content (the content that costs you money when someone visits that page) should be behind some kind of (free?) authentication/login? That would certainly help limit the number of visits to real visitors. You could perhaps have a non-copyrighted snippet or summary that can be indexed by all that linked to the full article in ...


9

I do not know a ton about StumbleUpon but I do know that Google only gives you a slight ding for 301 redirects. So by that measure you should not have an issue with doing a 301 redirect for a page that StumbleUpon is linked to. Google will still crawl it and just see it is now a 301. The only concern I would have is if StumbleUpon removes links that it ...


9

Determining the cause of strange localised traffic spikes that don't appear to be from human visitors requires patience and detective work, but the basic steps are to: Find out where it's coming from using the tools available to you (see below). Determine if it's dangerous or not by analysing the sources of the request, the frequency, the request headers ...


8

i just came across this info graphic from slingshot that might be of interest :


7

I run a hobby website that gets about 140K visitors per month and about 5.3 pages per visit. I decided to put a few Adsense text links on it several years back and I have been totally surprised at how much it has brought in. I was able to place the text ads in a very tasteful manner that doesn't ruin the user experience. It is not enough to live on by any ...


7

Here are the services I know of where you can find traffic info, in descending order that I trust their data: http://trends.google.com/websites?q=stackoverflow.com&sa=N http://www.quantcast.com/stackoverflow.com http://siteanalytics.compete.com/stackoverflow.com/ http://www.alexa.com/siteinfo/stackoverflow.com# I also like ...


7

Optimise your application before optimising your server infrastructure It's tempting to throw more servers at traffic spikes or overpay for resources that you may never use "just in case". A better solution is to optimise your application to withstand spikes before they arrive. Specifically: Cache dynamic code Your application should serve static html files ...


7

Install the Alexa spyware, I mean toolbar, and visit your website once a day. Alexa is completely useless as a metric of any kind. I wouldn't spend any time worrying about it.


7

About a year ago Google tackled this problem by creating Source Attribution meta tags: syndication-source: this meta tag is used to point to the long-lived (bookmarkable) URL of the original article. This should be used on all pages that republish the syndicated content, but it can also be used on the original page to point to itself as the syndication ...


6

I would suggest: http://www.business.com/ http://dir.yahoo.com/ http://www.dmoz.org/ Beyond those three, I would not be willing to pay as it could not help you at all. Google tends to give very low PR for incoming links from sites known to be paid directory sites.


6

It basically means these requests are missing the http referrer header. There are several reasons why that would be the case - A https page has a link to your website, and the user follows that link. Browsers don't send the referrer in case of a https -> http transition. A simple case is a search engine accessed via https. They are behind some kind of ...


6

If we'll divide the 322GB on 16 days and 2000 visits we'll get about 10MB per visit. It may be absolutely normal if you have on the site some video or pdf files. Google Analytics can help tracking the traffic.


6

Programming with an eye towards scalability is desirable, but it can also be very limiting. The truth is that 95% of sites will never need to worry about scalability. Unless you plan to have more than 10,000 pages on your site (such as might be accumulated by collecting lots of user generated content), I wouldn't worry about scalability. Just choose your ...


5

Place a Facebook "Like" button on your key pages so users can share them on Facebook Place a retweet button on your key pages so users can tweet about them Put a Google +1 button on your pages so people in your network can see you like those pages If you publish content on a regular basis offer an RSS feed of that content If your content allows for it, ...


5

I figured out my issue. You can use a Google Analytics account to track a domain and if you change the domain name and do a 301 redirect from the old to the new you can use the same Analytics tracking code. Note, the 301 isn't required though. However, Google Webmaster does not work the same. When you switch domain names you will need to add the new ...


5

So it looks to me, based on this question over on StumbleUpon's support site that there's a bit of a downside in terms of one aspect of SU, from a SU employee: Sorry, we can't redirect existing reviews to new urls, nor change the entry details for existing reviews. You may wish to ensure that you have a redirect on each of your "old" pages ...


5

Regularly post great content, obtained by whatever means are available to you. There's nothing wrong with ghost writers. They give you better control to define what you're site is about. Regularly promote the site, by whatever means are available to you. Don't forget the routes traditionally used by any new product; eg newspaper, magazine, journal ...


5

This is a good example of when to use tags vs categories. There's nothing wrong with having varied content on a blog, or any other kind of web site. You just want to: Ensure people can get to the content that they want, and only what they want via various readers Pay attention to the topics that interest people the most and make sure that those people get ...


5

In addition to those above, some second tier directories to consider: Best of the Web JoeAnt GoGuides They don't deliver as much traffic as the ones mentioned above, but they do deliver traffic and cost a lot less so the value of your investment is probably the same.



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