Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

19

There are no penalties or preferences given for TLDs in google.com. All TLDs are treated equally in a google.com web search. However, TLDs do affect your search results for country specific searches. For example, a .me or .tv domain will not rank as well as a .us website in a google.us web search. Also, a .co.uk site will rank better then a .us site in a ...


18

The site you saw is run by Public-Root, one of the many alternative root zone operators. These are essentially rogue organizations that create/sell custom TLDs that aren't sanctioned or recognized by ICANN and only exist on their own private root DNS servers. So, technically, they're right, you can buy a custom TLD from them for $1000. The only problem is ...


13

.info The name is derived from information indicating that the domain is intended for informative Internet resources, although registration requirements do not prescribe any theme orientation. .me You're in Montenegro? Seriously, I am not a fan of using other country codes for other uses. I don't like things whose legal jurisdiction is not my ...


13

From the "Gov Internet Program Guidelines" on DotGov.gov: No Political or Campaign Information: The Gov Internet domain is for the operation of government, not the political, political party, or campaign environment. No campaigning can be done using .gov domains. However, I'm pretty sure that GOP.gov doesn't put forth a purely unbiased viewpoint. In my ...


11

In short: no, Google does not penalize .me or .tv sites by default. Google would generally treat .me and .tv domains the same as .com. They're all seen as generic TLDs (gTLDs), so they are not country-specific by default (technically, .me and .tv are ccTLDs, but since they're used so widely, Google treats them as gTLDs). .co.uk is a bit different - it's a ...


11

Google only associates top-level domains with geographic regions: Sites with country-coded top-level domains (such as .ie) are already associated with a geographic region, in this case Ireland. — Geotargeting - Webmasters/Site owners Help Use top-level domains whenever possible to handle country-specific content. We're more likely to know that .ie ...


10

If a registry breaches their ICANN agreement for business or technical reasons, ICANN can force them to transfer data to another registry through the Registry Transition Process. For gTLDs, an RFP is sent out for someone to take over the registry. If no RFPs are received or approved, then the gTLD will be closed in accordance with the gTLD's sunset rules. ...


8

It does appear that ICANN will be allowing you to purchase your own TLD, but I would be incredibly skeptical of any company offering to sell you one - especially right now. It looks like ICANN will start taking applications on Wednesday, Jan. 12th (tomorrow, on the date of this answer) and will be accepting applications up until April. I have not been able ...


7

The main risk is that you become subject to the laws of the country the domain service is provided by. The Libyan domain 'vb.ly' registered by Ben Metcalfe and Violet Blue for a URL shortening service was famously shut down, for example, because the content hosted on it was seen by Libyan authorities to contravene Sharia law. Beyond that, two other things ...


7

If you use a ccTLD like .in, you won't be able to set geotargeting to a different country in Webmaster Tools. For example, you generally wouldn't be able to geotarget users in France when using a .in domain name (we use a few other signals for geotargeting, but the ccTLD is a fairly strong signal, since it's something that users see as well). That said, ...


7

I don't think the TLD has a direct impact on SEO, as long as you use good page titles and a readable URL structure. It's long been a convention to use .com addresses for business websites, as well as near any other site, simply because of the prevalence of .com addresses. But it's now much harder to get meaningful domain names on .com because of how widely ...


6

I don't think they are worth registering at all. If yourdomain.com is already taken try something different but that still ends with the .com IMO the only other domains are worth registering are the country specific domain. If you start a business in Italy (and you planned to sell there) it's much better to get a yourbusiness.it domain rather than a .com, ...


6

No, you can't. The registrar has to have a contract with the organisation that manages the TLD. Note also that gr.com is not a TLD; com is a TLD and someone has registered gr.com and is selling subdomains. But because it's not an official TLD, many of the safeguards that you get when registering a domain name do not exist.


6

No, gTLDs are of no concern to the "regular web user". The only ones that might be interested in acquiring a gTLDs are large companies and organizations with enough money to be able to afford the $185,000 dollar application fee and the ongoing cost of operating a TLD. Unless your employer fits that description, you can safely ignore these. Furthermore, ...


6

Registering myna.me for a web app in a niche market is just fine, especially if you think it works well as a brand for your marketing. Web designers should be more aware that the .me ccTLD is often used for personalized websites. Many large corporate sites (e.g., Facebook, Google, Visa, etc...) have also registered .me domains for URL shortening purposes ...


5

Google: Working with multi-regional websites Google generally uses the following elements to determine the geotargeting of a website (or a part of a website): Use of a ccTLD is generally a strong signal for users since it explicitly specifies a single country in an unmistakable way. or Webmaster Tools' manual geotargeting for gTLDs ...


5

Go grey hat with Network Solutions. They provide proxy EU registrations through their affiliate corporation: http://www.networksolutions.com/support/registering-eu-domain-names-2/


5

Verisign maintains a list of .name registrars here. You can filter the list either by country or by domain extension (but not both, sadly).


5

I'd say get both, if you can! And use 301 redirection for the secondary(s). I am bemused at the number of times I've given .uk URLs and email addresses to people, who've immediately read it back as .com. A good job, I usually hold the .com domain too. .com is so ingrained in people's brains. Pretty much any other TLD (or ccTLD) has potential for confusion! ...


5

Google, and probably other search engines too, uses ccTLDs as a "strong signal" that a site is intended for a specific country. Using .at, therefore, wouldn't be ideal for what you describe. So if your target is global avoid .at, but you needn't use .com - any gTLD should do the trick, and probably be cheaper. Sources: ...


5

No. From Google's FAQ: *.com, .org, .gov, .ponies—does my top-level domain impact my site's performance in search? Google's goal is to return the best and most relevant results to the user, regardless of the top-level domain. If our system determines that the best result is a page on a new gTLD, we'll return that page in search results.* ...


5

If you are using a 301 redirect on each of these misspelled sites it does not cause a problem with duplicate content. For all intents and purposes, there is only 1 website when you 301 redirect the other sites to your main site. Here is a google forum question on the topic


4

It terms of public perception I think the domain is becoming less and less relevant. There are (at least) two factors at play here. Firstly, I'm seeing more and more adverts for companies that simply say "search [terms]" when the company wants to direct you to a web site. This means that the user isn't typing the site name and so is less likely to notice ...


4

You are aware already that this is not intended according to the regulations outlined in Article 4 of the respective EC regulation 733/2002: The Registry shall: [...] (b) register domain names in the .eu TLD through any accredited .eu Registrar requested by any: (i) undertaking having its registered office, central administration or ...


4

I would suggest utilizing a 301 redirect to a new subdomain location. Subdirectories aren't handled as well from an SEO perspective, and it also diminishes the geo-focus of a site. I say this based off of practice, lest you wonder. Another question is where the hosting is occurring for the international domains? Do you have them hosted in those countries ...


4

I can't tell you what the consequences of this will be for sure but I think you can do this and reasonably manage your rankings if you follow best practices. If possible do a 301 redirect from the old URLs to the new URLs. This means for each and every page. This will let the search engines, and users, know the page has moved and let them know the location ...


4

You will need permission from the owner of the root zone for the Top-Level Domain (TLD) to acquire a copy of the root zone. The IANA Root Zone Database lists owners for different TLD's if you'd like to follow up (some may require that you have a verifiable academic or business interest in the information). As an example, Verisign maintains an FAQ for ...


4

The cost of registering a domain name under a given TLD has nothing to do with how Google–or any search engine–would rank it for search results. What registrar would this even be based on? Right now, NetSol registers .info at $34.99, but GoDaddy is offering them at $1.99 (down from a normal $11.99). The difference in their pricing for .in is about the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible