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119

If ( your site does not make money ){ do what makes you happy } else if ( the cost of supporting IE6 > the money you make from IE6 users ) { stop supporting IE6 } else { keep making money from IE6 users }


40

I agree that your decision obviously should reflect the business realities and audience of your particular website. That said, large companies officially dropping support for IE6 is still significant. It raises the general perception that it is finally OK to leave a 10 year old browser behind. It also adds ammunition to any case you wish to make to the ...


25

Only break the back button if it is expected (if it makes sense to not go back after an event in your website). Mozilla did a study about how people are using its browser and the results for the back button are impressive: The Back button is used far more often than any other navigation element (by which we mean the Back, Forward, Reload, Stop, and Home ...


20

This is the standard way of loading with @font-face, hacky fixes and all!! @font-face { font-family: 'BebasNeueRegular'; src: url('BebasNeue-webfont.eot'); src: url('BebasNeue-webfont.eot?#iefix') format('embedded-opentype'), url('BebasNeue-webfont.woff') format('woff'), url('BebasNeue-webfont.ttf') format('truetype'), ...


18

Ensure that every image has alt text. Make sure that your colour scheme is suitable for those with colour blindness. Offer a high contrast layout or large text layout for the visually impaired. Make sure your links make sense when read out of context (i.e. don't just write "click here"). Ensure your site still offers full basic functionality if the user ...


14

From w3c: Authors should use & (ASCII decimal 38) instead of "&" to avoid confusion with the beginning of a character reference (entity reference open delimiter).


13

I think this has to be dictated by metrics. If a significant number / percentage of visitors is using older browsers, you should support your visitors. What is "significant" depends on the client. ;-)


10

Here is probably the best article about quirks mode that I have found. I personally try to always use standard mode whenever possible since it has the best chances to work with the majority of browsers.


9

@Su is correct, but to address @Konrad's comment - W3.org (home of the W3C) answers this question directly The HTML5 specification redefines b and i elements to have some semantic function, rather than being purely presentational. However, the simple fact that the tag names are 'b' for bold and 'i' for italic means that people are likely to ...


8

I found a solution for removing the "Line indented incorrectly" error but first I should say that dragonmantank has a excellent point - you shouldn't mix PHP and HTML. It is a recipe for headaches. However, unfortunatly I think mixing PHP and HTML is very common especially in legacy software. The quickest and dirtyest fix assuming we are using the phpcs ...


8

There are several ways of tagging your site. One option is to add a SafeSurf META tag to your header, with a form available at that site to generate the appropriate tag. Another option is to generate an ICRA Meta tag and RDF file to describe your site. However, it looks like some consensus is building on a standardized way of tagging your site. Initially, ...


8

To answer your question: yes, your current DTD is fine. But it's also the wrong question. Standards don't work like this. It's not about making sure you're always using the latest one, and they don't really "expire" in the way that your question seems to suggest. They're about picking one and following its rules. Even if your site were using HTML 4 and ...


7

Making your mark-up semantic is a massive step towards accessibility, if your site can be navigated without any CSS being applied to it and the content makes sense then everything else is just visual gravy!


7

I am a product manager about to spend 40 MD supporting IE6 for a single customer. We sell software into call centers, an unfortunately IE6 is the default platform for many big organizations. My point is it depends, if I was building consumer web software I would have been off IE6 a long time ago, but as long as we have clients using IE6 we have to support ...


7

There is no fold, as in there being any such thing as The Fold, especially when you start factoring in weird custom toolbar configurations. Not that it's made any significant progress toward making people stop asking for this. The true answer for your site is going to require looking at your analytics and seeing what the most common window size is. Note I ...


7

**The fold does not exist.** **The fold does not exist.** **The fold does not exist.** **The fold does not exist.** **The fold does not exist.** **The fold does not exist.** ...


7

As you note, RFC 2616 requires that a 401 response be accompanied by an RFC 2617 WWW-Authenticate header. I suppose you could technically comply with that requirement by sending a bogus header like: WWW-Authenticate: Bogus realm="blahblah", comment="use form to log in" but I have no idea what browsers will do if presented with a 401 response containing ...


7

"As a web developer I find it inconvenient to use HTML & CSS" That's crazy, hasn't HTML and CSS come a long way in the last 10+ years? From javascript we got jQuery and AJAX, an improvement on javascript. HTML5 CSS3 improvements on HTML and design methods. With CSS improvements we've moved away from tables, have fluid designs. Now with mobile ...


7

The b and i tags are not deprecated. (In specs: HTML5, HTML4) What you're concerned with is appropriate use of the tags. If you're trying to show emphasis in a meaningful sense(as now), then you should use em or strong. If you just need some text to look italic/bold as a stylistic choice, then you use i or b. Consider the logo right here at top of the ...


6

Firstly the “the disabled” means nothings! So let look at some groups of people you need to check can you’re your web site. A poor person that only has a note-book with a small screen You just need to check your website can be used when the browser window is small without too match pain. A colour blind person Can someone use your website without seeing ...


6

You're going to run into a lot of issues running PHPCS with your PHP code mixed in with HTML. PHPCS is only really useful when you parse pure PHP scripts. The built-in coding standards are built around pure PHP, not mixed PHP/HTML. One option would be to build your own custom standard and using that instead. The custom standard would take into account the ...


5

Breaking the back button is like breaking the brake pedal in a car. Users expect it to always work and when it suddenly doesn't mayhem ensues. The back button might be the most used UI feature in a browser so altering its behavior it any way can, at best, do no good, and, at worst, result in user confusion and abandonment (or increased customer support ...


5

If you develop in quirks mode, then you are effectively asking the browser to emulate pre-IE6 bugs. Is that really something you want to be doing? Wikipedia explains the basics of triggering quirks mode, but there are a number of special cases it doesn't cover. The link provided by txwikinger gives a good explanation of the history and the main ...


5

It is pretty simple, but in case you're still having trouble, the most basic way to do it is to just use include() or require() to include the menu file at that particular location of the document. However, if you're already thinking of things in terms of maintainability and best practices, then you should probably just be using a templating system. So ...


4

You can use this site to get a quick overview of compliance: http://wave.webaim.org/ It performs a similar job to the old "Bobby" system that got shut down a couple of years ago.


4

I think you'll find Dive Into HTML5, a book in progress, a great resource. Here's a relevant section on when and how to use new semantic elements. For your example, I think that you may be able to omit the <section> tag.


4

You might want to try asking on http://startups.com/ - their website runs the same software this site does so the experience will be familiar for you, and they have guys there that know a hell of a lot about this sort of stuff.


4

Depends entirely on your site and what it does. A site where you play games or have fun can demand a lot more from its users, just like a game on a computer can demand cutting edge hardware. A bank can't be as scrutinizing, as it's vital their customers can access the service. A site made for people with disabilities can't be as scrutinizing either, ...


3

The dutch government uses this site to test its sites on accessibility. take a look... you can also enter your site to test its current status on accessibility... http://www.webrichtlijnen.nl/english/



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