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0

You can put // in front of your hrefs, that way it will use the same protocol as the requesting page.


2

To answer your question, no, it is not too late to implement the 301 redirect from HTTP to HTTPS. Don't switch back your sitemap to HTTP, it is not necessary. Yes Google can still call your HTTP site for a while until its indexes only the HTTPS URLs.


1

You should use `href="/wp-content/themes/Divi/epanel/shortcodes/css/shortcodes.css" in your HTML code. Then you should make sure that you use https:// form URLs in your CSS file for the URLs to any external resources.


1

Try to use https to fetch resources not located on your server. If it does not work (or if https is not supported), try to move the Google font file (css and woff) on your website server rather than fetching them from Google Font itself (ditto for other external resources). Regarding explicitly using https for resources located on your server, it is not ...


0

Google might need confirmation after you applied 301 redirect right after 302 redirect. Give some time to these pages of your website. Once the redirects will be confirmed in the eyes of Google, you might start seeing your pages back. If you have waited for so long, do these two tasks. Go to Google Webmaster Tools. Go to Fetch as Google and enter your ...


-1

It also depends on Competition. For example, I saw 2-3 sites from the 2th page in google.gr with https to come on 1th page. As Google says it has affected 1% till now.


1

Give it a bit of time, your rankings of before should come back within days (or weeks at most). The drop is likely caused by the change from HTTP to HTTPS. However, according to the Moz plugin, your page authority is 32 with 280 links, and your domain authority is 19 with 25K links. Your PA and DA are very low for such a number of links. You probably want ...


1

Perfectly fine to 301 redirect all HTTP pages to their HTTPS equivalent. Either via httpd.conf on Apache servers, .htaccess rewrites or with a PHP include like your example. Any inbound links would pass about 97% of weight through a 301 redirect. The best handling internally would be to not use the protocol for internal linkage so that compatibility is ...


3

This link explains what the CloudFlare SSL options are. Flexible SSL, at least at this time, does not fully encrypt to your server. The issue being discussed on the blog by Matthew ("Actually, we'll be providing a free certificate that's pinned to the domain that you can install on your server for end-to-end crypto.... for free") isn't available just yet. ...


4

CloudFlare's Flexible SSL does not negate the need for a certificate on their servers. They will simply be providing you one for free. So there is still an SSL certificate tied to your domain that they provide. It only negates the need of a certificate on the origin server. From the discussion on the CloudFlare Blog Actually, we'll be providing a ...


2

For your first two rewrites (non-www → www, http → https), the following rule should work: RewriteEngine On RewriteCond %{HTTPS} off [OR] RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} !=www.example.com [NC] RewriteRule ^(.*) https://www.example.com/$1 [NS,L,R=permanent] Just replace www.example.com with the actual canonical hostname of your site. As for your third ...


1

I need to double check the specifications, but I am pretty certain that cached objects depend on the request method. So an object using HTTP would be a different cache entity from HTTPS. So if you are redirecting to HTTPS, there should be no prior cache data. Also, you may want to consider using lower cache periods and requiring validation prior to ...


0

The idea is to encourage more web browsing to happen using SSL. The theory is that this prevents a wide variety of attacks and exploits, and is better practice, overall. If you already need to get a site certificate, it makes a lot of sense to just use it for the whole site. That also keeps you from having to gerrymander parts of the site into a "secure" ...


3

Yes, Google wants all of your site to be served over HTTPS. They say: Use HTTPS on all sites and pages Link leads to the exact part of production where that is specified, (though the whole video would be useful.) - Google I/O 2014 - HTTPS Everywhere.


4

Since pages are ranked individually I would assume that you do not have to have it on for pages you do not care about rankings for. But it is possible that since their goal is to get sites to have always have SSL on that they may take into account whether SSL is applied to an entire website or not. It's a brand new concept so only time will tell how it ...


0

You may need to use SSLProxyEngine On to make the proxy work via SSL. RewriteEngine On SSLProxyEngine On RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} ^babysnakes.com$ [NC] RewriteRule ^/$ https://dancingfool.com/moms.php [P,L] I did a quick test of proxy requests to an SSL page using the [P] flag and it worked for me. (different domains though)


1

Google should be able to handle all versions of SSL/TLS. The best way to see how Google handles something is via Google Webmaster Tools. Note: You have to have your site setup in Webmaster Tools for this to work. It's something you should consider anyway. Go to Webmaster Tools Select your site Select Crawl Select Fetch as Google


0

I was working for a third party company on a web project for a large tech corporation. We used a GoDaddy SSL certificate and found that this CA was rejected on internal company networks. The corporation at that time (2 years ago) did not automatically accept GoDaddy as a trusted authority. It was only with much persuasion that our certificate was accepted. ...



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