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0

How to test it? Just go to https://yoursite.com/, if it pulls up, it works!


2

If you see a totally different website, and your site is on shared hosting, it may be the case that your hoster has a configuration problem. This was the case in a similar question: "https://" refers to random site, "http://" is broken, but "http://www" works Check if your and the other site are hosted by the same provider ...


1

As you say you are directed to a compromising website, I would check that your site hasnt been hacked in some way with a unwanted redirection to the said website.


5

No, you do not need a separate registration. http:// or https:// are just protocol specifiers. The name will resolve to the same host. However, once you're on the hosted machine, the web server determines what to display. Often, HTTP (port 80) and HTTPS (port 443) can be routed to different pages. This should be configurable by the website admin/tools. In ...


1

The best .htaccess code which I am able to give you to do the redirection is as following: # This allows you to redirect your entire website Redirect 301 / http://example.com/ You will have to modify the example as you add it into your .htaccess file.


1

HTTPS can achieve two things: Authentication. Making sure that you are communicating with the real domain owner. Encryption. Making sure that only this domain owner and you can read the communication. Probably everyone agrees that HTTPS should be mandatory when transmitting secrets (like passwords, banking data etc.). But there are several other cases ...


1

With me helping with the back-end system for a web hosting company, we strive to make sure our customers personal data is secured by SSL and we do encrypt their name, address, and phone numbers to just make sure if there is any data breaches, there should be minimal damage as possible. Trust is one thing when it comes to having loyal clients. As for your ...


1

You'll want to use SSL for any pages in the checkout process, for sure. Encrypting address data in your own database is optional. If someone were able to access your database, they'd likely be able to get your encryption key also, so that would provide little defense. Also name and address are not nearly as sensitive of information as credit card data.


2

There isn't really a reason not to, other than the cost of the SSL itself. For a typical webserver deployment SSL adds little overhead. There are talks for the http 2.0 standard to make encryption mandatory: http://beta.slashdot.org/story/194289


2

Secrecy Since your content is public, HTTPS obviously won't hide it, but it might provide some benefits depending on the nature of your site. Privacy When someone requests a page over HTTPS, the request is encrypted, so if someone is watching your visitors, they won't know which pages they requested. Unfortunately, DNS (the system for getting an IP ...


0

Here's an angle you may not have considered: not using SSL/TLS can expose your users to passive monitoring even if your site has no logins. A threat actor may simply sit between your user and the rest of the Internet, watching all the URLs your user requests and building patterns of things your user is viewing. Individual bits of information may indeed be ...


3

I largely agree with Closetnoc's points, but there's another point that's been overlooked: Tor users need a SSL version to prevent exit nodes from eavesdropping. If you suspect any of your readers use Tor, you should have SSL enabled as a matter of practise. Also, +1 on Max Reid's point: at the very least, you help normalise the use of encryption for ...


6

Interesting question. However, the obvious answer would be if I can get a website with a browser, then the NSA can get it too. I am not trying to be a smarty-pants on this. SSL should be used for account login, payments, etc. As a normal course of work, it is not necessary. Having said that, I do support SSL more than this answer implies. If you are a ...


0

It came down to the ssl .conf file being in the location that should have had a soft link to the file that I was editing. As soon as I fixed the link, the redirect start working. However, the logging wasn't working because I hadn't specified the RewriteLogLevel. I"m not sure if the level has to be specified, or if the default is 0 and as a result nothing ...



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