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8

For your first two rewrites (non-www → www, http → https), the following rule should work: RewriteEngine On RewriteCond %{HTTPS} off [OR] RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} !=www.example.com [NC] RewriteRule ^(.*) https://www.example.com/$1 [NS,L,R=permanent] Just replace www.example.com with the actual canonical hostname of your site. As for your third ...


5

You need to add a new site on Google Webmaster Tools and set the domain as https://example.com all the data is being collected there instead.


4

Yes, Google wants all of your site to be served over HTTPS. They say: Use HTTPS on all sites and pages Link leads to the exact part of production where that is specified, (though the whole video would be useful.) - Google I/O 2014 - HTTPS Everywhere.


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Since pages are ranked individually I would assume that you do not have to have it on for pages you do not care about rankings for. But it is possible that since their goal is to get sites to have always have SSL on that they may take into account whether SSL is applied to an entire website or not. It's a brand new concept so only time will tell how it ...


4

CloudFlare's Flexible SSL does not negate the need for a certificate on their servers. They will simply be providing you one for free. So there is still an SSL certificate tied to your domain that they provide. It only negates the need of a certificate on the origin server. From the discussion on the CloudFlare Blog Actually, we'll be providing a ...


3

This link explains what the CloudFlare SSL options are. Flexible SSL, at least at this time, does not fully encrypt to your server. The issue being discussed on the blog by Matthew ("Actually, we'll be providing a free certificate that's pinned to the domain that you can install on your server for end-to-end crypto.... for free") isn't available just yet. ...


2

As of August 2014 Google has officially indicated that HTTPS will be used as a ranking signal. This means that even if your website is a completely static website, if you care about SEO you should at least consider setting up an SSL certificate. Of course HTTPS is just one ranking signal out of hundreds, so there are probably more important things you can ...


2

To answer your question, no, it is not too late to implement the 301 redirect from HTTP to HTTPS. Don't switch back your sitemap to HTTP, it is not necessary. Yes Google can still call your HTTP site for a while until its indexes only the HTTPS URLs.


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HTTPS/HTTP is a protocol and technically are not classed as a new site You do not need to inform Google Webmaster Tools that your site has moved, this is because HTTPS and HTTP are protocols and not are not treated the same as say changing domain or sub domain. You can even see when adding a site to webmaster tools it doesn't even ask for a protocol: ...


1

You have to use the 301 header when redirecting the page. This way you're telling Google that the page has moved and it will index it. Google has recently announced that it will offer a boost to SSL websites.


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The new page will be indexed and the old page will be removed from the index, assuming the content of both page is the same and that one has not left a canonical URL to the HTTP URL in the HTTPS version. Yes, search engines are fine with HTTPS.


1

Looks like you are encrypting the traffic twice - once over WAN and another time over LAN. Normally, the reverse proxy would be set up as the SSL termination point as it is usually unnecessary to encrypt the traffic over a secure LAN connection. From your Apache configuration, the reverse proxy (Server ALPHA) is connecting to the web server (Server BETA) ...


1

You should use `href="/wp-content/themes/Divi/epanel/shortcodes/css/shortcodes.css" in your HTML code. Then you should make sure that you use https:// form URLs in your CSS file for the URLs to any external resources.


1

Try to use https to fetch resources not located on your server. If it does not work (or if https is not supported), try to move the Google font file (css and woff) on your website server rather than fetching them from Google Font itself (ditto for other external resources). Regarding explicitly using https for resources located on your server, it is not ...


1

Give it a bit of time, your rankings of before should come back within days (or weeks at most). The drop is likely caused by the change from HTTP to HTTPS. However, according to the Moz plugin, your page authority is 32 with 280 links, and your domain authority is 19 with 25K links. Your PA and DA are very low for such a number of links. You probably want ...


1

Perfectly fine to 301 redirect all HTTP pages to their HTTPS equivalent. Either via httpd.conf on Apache servers, .htaccess rewrites or with a PHP include like your example. Any inbound links would pass about 97% of weight through a 301 redirect. The best handling internally would be to not use the protocol for internal linkage so that compatibility is ...


1

We've made a tool for that – SslCheck. We've got tired of checking every web page manually and created a crawler. It goes through all pages and shows you which ones have "non-secure" content. All you need to do is enter you root URL. Hope it saves someone some time.


1

I need to double check the specifications, but I am pretty certain that cached objects depend on the request method. So an object using HTTP would be a different cache entity from HTTPS. So if you are redirecting to HTTPS, there should be no prior cache data. Also, you may want to consider using lower cache periods and requiring validation prior to ...



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