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11

I would recommend you to install and enable Akismet: http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/akismet/ Akismet checks your comments against the Akismet web service to see if they look like spam or not and lets you review the spam it catches under your blog's "Comments" admin screen.


6

Look into having a honey pot in your form, this will only work though if it's a generic robot, as the moment a custom script is written the honeypot can easily be bypassed. Also, if you're not keen on a CAPTCHA you could try Solve Media's alternative and earn a bit on the side at the same time, I think it was Ticketmaster who recently started using them as ...


3

I would recommend you to use a free captcha service like SweetCaptcha http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/sweetcaptcha-revolutionary-free-captcha-service/ You can also use an external service to manage your comments like Disqus http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/disqus-comment-system/


3

The ideal way to do this is to send a hard fail on email that isn't coming from your server IP address or your specified MX record by doing this: v=spf1 +a +mx -all This however will not Stop the email from being sent. Spam filters do various checks on an email that has been sent out, one of them will be a check on the SPF record of the domain it is ...


3

Having tried a bunch of different methods in the past, my answer, at least as far as "unspammable" goes, would be "You can't." Even with your image technique, or no matter what else you do, as soon as somebody does e-mail you they'll have your address in their address book. And then they'll get infected by a virus that steals their address book and sends ...


2

To avoid bots, you can try any of the following, but CAPTCHA is the best way to avoid scripted attacks. You could use CSRF tokens to avoid this Insert or remove some value via JavaScript from the form element and verify the same on the server end. Check for the HTTP referer on sign up


2

Having any email address exposed you run the risk of having the spam bots collecting that email address, there are methods that I'll list that can help you but its just like a car alarm, a car alarm can help prevent your car being stolen but it doesn't necessary mean it can't. Bots are forever becoming more complex and many are rendering pages just like real ...


2

Rather than have a email address on your site, I would suggest using a form that users can use to contact you. A contact form is much better at spam control than email: Sale value: An email address can be found and sold to spammers, a contact form cannot. Automation: An email address can be discovered in the page and bot spammed. An effective contact ...


2

By far my favorite technique is called a 'honeypot'. Here is how it works... Say your form asks for a name. Put the following two fields on the page: <span class='hp'> <label for='Message'>Message:</label > <textarea id='Message' name='message' /> </span> <span> <label for='TmpField'>Message:</label > ...


2

From my personal experience, I have found that CAPTCHA is virtually ineffective when it comes to preventing spam attacks. What I use and I found to be the most useful is adding a field to the form and covering it with CSS so that it is not exposed to human visitors. Spam bots feed value to these fields and can be blocked easily. It is simpler than any of the ...


1

It might already be too late to use this idea since the spammers already know about the form: leave out a critical piece of your form (like the action attribute) and populate it using javascript when the document is loaded. Do tell visitors that the form doesn't work if javascript is disabled and remove this message when the form is set up correctly.


1

Use canonical URLs for your content pages. Then whenever Google crawls or find a link to one with the referrer in the query string it will automatically associate it with the canonical URL. The canonical URL will be the URL Google shows in the search results. It also prevents your site from appearing to have duplicate content.


1

To be honest with you I would like to think that Mail Chimp will have spf records and domain keys etc all sorted out and generally keeping the reputation of their infrastructure clean. Hence I would imagine this will be issues with your content and interactions from your recipients. A couple of things I have noticed straight off. It looks quite image ...


1

Has this been seen only through testing? I've run into similar problems when sending email from my Google account address to that same account. It seems that because Google recognises that the account didn't actually send itself email from the Google server it marks it as spam because the email address has been 'spoofed'. If this is the case for you, you can ...


1

My experience has been to use a "generic"alias for position-based email (e.g. webmaster, admin, sales, etc.) and send it to the address of whomever has those duties at the time. You can often add more than one address to the alias list, so if you need to keep records of all incoming messages you can send them to an additional box that you maintain control ...


1

It is best to use just webmaster@address.com. This way, webmasters every year will have a record of, and will easily be able to refer to, historical mails if needed. Volunteer organizations, more often than not, need to keep records, and changing the email ID every year is unthinkable! If you want to attribute the work of each webmaster to them as and when ...


1

Just because mailboxes hosted on your VPS are sending out spam, it does not mean that your server was compromised. A script may have maliciously accessed their email credentials from anywhere and is now subsequently able to access as and when they like to distribute thousands of spam emails to huge email lists (or, most likely to everyone in that mailboxes ...


1

Would it be better to use, for example newsletter@mydomain.com Yes, using newsletter@mydomain.com would be a better choice. The reasons are: As covered here, using the prefix newsletter is more descriptive and contextual - it helps convey the content of the message to the recipient, whereas info is too generic to convey anything. Spammers often target ...


1

Paul cannot stop Jason from sending emails with Pauls link. The websites within the email shouldn't be blacklisted, though the IP and or Domain of the mail server may get blacklisted by email filters if enough complaints are sent in to hosting providers. Depending on Jason is sending his emails, spam and junk mail filters may already be doing their job and ...


1

You can prepare a list of bots which you don't want to allow on your website & mention them in robots.txt like User-agent: <bot_identifier> Disallow: / Here is a exhaustive bad bots list. But still many bad bots will not respect it & crawl your site. For that you need to install application like Fail2ban to restrict the crawlers which are ...


1

I think you might be mis-interpreting Gmail's suggestions, as "Use the same address in the 'From:' header on every bulk mail you send" is something they're suggesting you should do, not something they're saying to avoid. It's quite common for mail servers to send out emails for multiple domains, so I'd be surprised if this was a particularly high spam ...


1

First off - it is near impossible to ensure 100% spam is never received on a public site that allows user submission, the best you can hope for is lowering it as much as you can.... Spam prevention is like a car alarm, it lowers the chances of becoming a victim. There is hundreds of guides on the net but here's 5 solutions:, I personally just remove the ...



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