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3

The ideal way to do this is to send a hard fail on email that isn't coming from your server IP address or your specified MX record by doing this: v=spf1 +a +mx -all This however will not Stop the email from being sent. Spam filters do various checks on an email that has been sent out, one of them will be a check on the SPF record of the domain it is ...


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Can you not just require that any post with a hyper-link must be approved before going live? This is what I do on my site. You can catch most of the spam and let the occasional legitimate post through with a genuine link.


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By far my favorite technique is called a 'honeypot'. Here is how it works... Say your form asks for a name. Put the following two fields on the page: <span class='hp'> <label for='Message'>Message:</label > <textarea id='Message' name='message' /> </span> <span> <label for='TmpField'>Message:</label > ...


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From my personal experience, I have found that CAPTCHA is virtually ineffective when it comes to preventing spam attacks. What I use and I found to be the most useful is adding a field to the form and covering it with CSS so that it is not exposed to human visitors. Spam bots feed value to these fields and can be blocked easily. It is simpler than any of the ...


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To delete all the spam pages, instead install extension DeleteBatch. Edit a script file from Special:AllPages of all the page names you want deleted. Load this into Special:DeleteBatch. Use PHPmyAdmin to mass delete the unwanted users.


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There is not enough information for anyone to really know what is going on here. But here is what you may be missing. Any system has several services installed along with applications; FTP, HTTP, SSH, DNS, and PHP and Java are fairly common. You will have more. Each service and application can be vulnerable. PHP and Java are environments/languages that can ...


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It might already be too late to use this idea since the spammers already know about the form: leave out a critical piece of your form (like the action attribute) and populate it using javascript when the document is loaded. Do tell visitors that the form doesn't work if javascript is disabled and remove this message when the form is set up correctly.


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Use canonical URLs for your content pages. Then whenever Google crawls or find a link to one with the referrer in the query string it will automatically associate it with the canonical URL. The canonical URL will be the URL Google shows in the search results. It also prevents your site from appearing to have duplicate content.


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To be honest with you I would like to think that Mail Chimp will have spf records and domain keys etc all sorted out and generally keeping the reputation of their infrastructure clean. Hence I would imagine this will be issues with your content and interactions from your recipients. A couple of things I have noticed straight off. It looks quite image ...


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My experience has been to use a "generic"alias for position-based email (e.g. webmaster, admin, sales, etc.) and send it to the address of whomever has those duties at the time. You can often add more than one address to the alias list, so if you need to keep records of all incoming messages you can send them to an additional box that you maintain control ...


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It is best to use just webmaster@address.com. This way, webmasters every year will have a record of, and will easily be able to refer to, historical mails if needed. Volunteer organizations, more often than not, need to keep records, and changing the email ID every year is unthinkable! If you want to attribute the work of each webmaster to them as and when ...


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Just because mailboxes hosted on your VPS are sending out spam, it does not mean that your server was compromised. A script may have maliciously accessed their email credentials from anywhere and is now subsequently able to access as and when they like to distribute thousands of spam emails to huge email lists (or, most likely to everyone in that mailboxes ...


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Would it be better to use, for example newsletter@mydomain.com Yes, using newsletter@mydomain.com would be a better choice. The reasons are: As covered here, using the prefix newsletter is more descriptive and contextual - it helps convey the content of the message to the recipient, whereas info is too generic to convey anything. Spammers often target ...


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Paul cannot stop Jason from sending emails with Pauls link. The websites within the email shouldn't be blacklisted, though the IP and or Domain of the mail server may get blacklisted by email filters if enough complaints are sent in to hosting providers. Depending on Jason is sending his emails, spam and junk mail filters may already be doing their job and ...



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