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By far my favorite technique is called a 'honeypot'. Here is how it works... Say your form asks for a name. Put the following two fields on the page: <span class='hp'> <label for='Message'>Message:</label > <textarea id='Message' name='message' /> </span> <span> <label for='TmpField'>Message:</label > ...


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From my personal experience, I have found that CAPTCHA is virtually ineffective when it comes to preventing spam attacks. What I use and I found to be the most useful is adding a field to the form and covering it with CSS so that it is not exposed to human visitors. Spam bots feed value to these fields and can be blocked easily. It is simpler than any of the ...


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It might already be too late to use this idea since the spammers already know about the form: leave out a critical piece of your form (like the action attribute) and populate it using javascript when the document is loaded. Do tell visitors that the form doesn't work if javascript is disabled and remove this message when the form is set up correctly.


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Use canonical URLs for your content pages. Then whenever Google crawls or find a link to one with the referrer in the query string it will automatically associate it with the canonical URL. The canonical URL will be the URL Google shows in the search results. It also prevents your site from appearing to have duplicate content.


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To be honest with you I would like to think that Mail Chimp will have spf records and domain keys etc all sorted out and generally keeping the reputation of their infrastructure clean. Hence I would imagine this will be issues with your content and interactions from your recipients. A couple of things I have noticed straight off. It looks quite image ...



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