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10

They use a vulnerability in Google Analytics to make fake visits so the only way to stop them for now, and until Google fix it, is to make a filter in GA since that is the source of the problem. Blocking them in the .htaccess file is pointless since this kind of Spam never visits your site. Check this answers for more information about this spam ...


7

I assume you're referencing Blogger (blogger.com)? Referer spam has been a problem on Blogger and other blogging sites for a very long time. Unfortunately there isn't an effective way to block it because it's very difficult to distinguish legitimate referers from spammers. Editing your robots.txt file will not help because spammers often use fake ...


6

Akismet is free for personal use. It's from the makers of WordPress and will work with many platforms. There are libraries available for Python, PHP, ColdFusion, .Net, etc.


6

a solution to that is to render the email information encoded, and a javascript function decode them and show them after the page have been load. Nothing hard to code and deocode, a simple one can do the work. Other way is to render your email to an image and show the image. With any trick like that the spammers can not easy read your email to place it on ...


5

Here are 3 ways I have seen to do this: One way - http://stackoverflow.com/questions/8472/practical-non-image-based-captcha-approaches. Another way - http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2475806/captcha-replacement Msft has even made a one with Ajax! http://www.asp.net/AJAX/AjaxControlToolkit/Samples/NoBot/NoBot.aspx In general there are 3 "ways" to solve ...


4

To block all "blank" User-Agents or User-Agents consisting of a hyphen, you could use the following in your .htaccess RewriteCond %{HTTP_USER_AGENT} ^-?$ RewriteRule ^ - [F]


4

SPAM reasons, Yes. Google no. There are non-Google spiders that look specifically for email addresses, presumably for SPAM purposes. So over the years people have tried to find ways to make email addresses less "visible" to spam crawlers. A very common way is to display name (at) domain (dot) com with a script behind it to allow the link to work as an ...


3

No, that is not true. Email address obfuscation is the result of webmasters attempting to make their email addresses unrecognizable to spambot crawlers. Spammers employ bots that crawl the Internet looking for email addresses to harvest so they can send spam to them. By changing the @ symbol into (at) the webmaster is hoping that the spambots will not ...


3

I do not see any big problem but Spamassassin is giving three hints on how to make the email look better: you get 2.5 points for having an image and only a few words. Remove the image or increase the text length you get 1.1 points for your formatting. Your Email is not correct HTML (e.g., is missing the <html> tag you get 1.2 points because you are ...


2

Do you have a cache like e.g. Varnish running? Or another proxy software. Then this would be a reason why you have many requests from 127.0.0.1. I would not block them just like this. You seem to have other problems on your server. Check if someone hacked your server and does now make local requests.


2

Have you actually got in touch with Spamhaus? They might do white listing on an IP by IP basis. The other option is to change your ISP to one not hosted on a a range that's blacklisted. Edit Have you tried this: http://www.spamhaus.org/sbl/sbl.lasso?query=SBL80808#removal Edit 2 To be completely honest, if you're THAT desperate to get off the spamhaus ...


2

Since you already had your emailaddress publicly available on the website it's already too late. You can still remove the plain-text email address from the website. There are several techniques for this, e.g.: 'Ofuscate' the address: E.g. info at example dot com or inforemovethis@example.com Use an image which contains the emailaddress Remove the mailto: ...


2

I have a lot of experience stopping spam. In fact, I used to speak with GFI and shared some of my filter techniques with them. You can stop spam with near 100% effectiveness with a few simple steps. This does not negate the need for an anti-spam filter or mean that you will never get spam, however, just a couple of things will almost stop spam cold. It is ...


2

www.greatfirewallofchina.org is a tool built just for this. Here and here are other tools with similar functionality.


2

Just create a valid hostname filter in GA. 90% of the spam will never bother you again. Read the section on Ghost Referrals: http://www.analyticsedge.com/2014/12/removing-referral-spam-google-analytics/


2

I'd recommend: connection: close on pages that don't list any other resources that are stored on your server for best performance. If you can setup a 404 error page without loading any images or special assets, then connection: close is good. If you need resources to completely load the error page, then connection: close isn't as good since the ...


2

We need to block the Spam websites by different methods- 1)In .htaccess file as explained in this https://www.optimizesmart.com/geek-guide-removing-referrer-spam-google-analytics/ article. 2)And also create the filter in Google Analytics so that you can filter the spam traffic. Another Reference ...


1

Be careful, you may still be banning valid users. Tor exit nodes often get mistaken for bots, so services like CloudFlare include a CAPTCHA to verify a real person accessing the website. You could implement something similar for your own website. If a visit comes from a questionable IP then include a CAPTCHA (or similar test) to ensure the visitor is a real ...


1

To state the obvious you can test if office 365 is blocking your emails by creating a 30 day trial. If your emails are being blocked then you need to address the issue why, which is how they are getting marked as spam. There are plenty of questions related to preventing email being classified as spam already on Pro Webmasters. Then you would either need to ...


1

This type of spam never accesses your site so blocking it in your htaccess file won't have any effect. To keep clean your GA you should stop it with filters You can either use the hostname solution Mike suggests or add filter for it. Go to Admin tab in Google Analytics Select the View you want to filter > Filter > New Filter In Filter Type choose ...


1

You can also just add a filter so that all traffic from these annoying sites are filtered out of your analytics and do not create fake results. In Google Analytics go to Admin Under VIEW select Filters Add New Filter Give the filter a name Select Filter Type: Exclude Select source destination: traffic to the host name Select expression: that are equal to ...


1

It is possible that some sites that link to you may run regular checks on their outbound links to make sure that they still work; if you block them there is a chance their script will see your link as dead and remove it, hurting your SEO. It is also possible that smaller search engines may use 'the cloud' to gather data, and blocking them would hurt your ...


1

I have also found myself in this position and wanted to give you my feedback: I've spent hours researching and refining my ip tables to get the best of both worlds, but in reality it's not possible to have any real accuracy and I have decided to take the scraping hit but allow full access to AWS. Like you have stated, AWS is a very popular platform for ...


1

As spambots generally fill in all fields of a form, I use a hidden input which, if filled in, prevents the form from being submitted. Obviously you'll need to have a label associated with it (also hidden) which states that it should be left blank so that screen reader users know what it's for and don't fill it in. I've been using this approach for years ...


1

You can block them using htaccess by putting something like this in the htaccess file in your root Wordpress directory: Order Deny,Allow Deny from 178.238.232.234


1

I've heard of people putting fields in forms and then hiding them behind an image or div. Then when the form is submitted, if that 'hidden' field is filed out then they know it was filed out by a bot and not a human. Obviously this method has drawbacks (particularly for the visually impaired) and I can't say I've ever implemented it myself.


1

I'd recommend looking at the third party solution that is disqus. It provides spam protection, moderation, and supports logins of openid, facebook, twitter, and their own disqus accounts.


1

It is not too difficult to roll your own basic CAPTCHA, or there are numerous tutorials and scripts out of the web. I've used a simple one in PHP based on random letters/numbers, feel free to take and modify for your purpose: // first generate random $string $pa_captcha_salt = 'random stuff'; $hash = md5( $string.$pa_captcha_salt ); $filename = ...


1

For solutions like this, if you're using an existing content management system, always seek best-of-breed solutions for your specific tool. The plus is that usually these tools are straightforward to install and test and if they don't work, try others out. If I were in your shoes and would check out Mollom. Here's a description: Mollom provides a one ...



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