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0

If the site doesn't exist anymore, you won't be able to host the sitemap file and share it with Google. The site and all its pages will automatically get de-indexed in some time.


2

Yes that link have nothing to see. But you can use following if you want to remove page from google search : Remove page URL from google


0

Andrew Loft's suggestion of a sitemap index file is perfectly acceptable. I agree with him that multiple sitemaps per site is OK and your use case for it is a good one. There are two other ways to let Google know about multiple sitemaps that work just as well: Submit all the sitemaps to Google Webmaster Tools You can submit a sitemap, no matter what it ...


1

Don't forget that there is also a 50MB limit to the uncompressed sitemap size. If each of your 50,000 pages had 1,000 images and each image entry in your sitemap were 50 bytes, your entire sitemap would end up being about 2GB. Clearly that is too large. Even including about 20 images per page would put you right about at the 50MB limit. I can't find any ...


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You can have multiple sitemaps per website, and this is a great example of when that makes sense. You should make sure you have a Sitemap Index listing each of your sitemaps. It will probably look something like: <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <sitemapindex xmlns="http://www.sitemaps.org/schemas/sitemap/0.9"> <sitemap> ...


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According to https://developers.google.com/webmasters/mobile-sites/mobile-seo/configurations/separate-urls, we need to add rel=alternate to our sitemap and rel=canonical to the corresponding page on the site.


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Just the fact that a URL is in the sitemap means that Google is likely to view it as the canonical page. In your sitemap, include only the canonical URL but not the non-canonical versions. Source: The Sitemap Paradox where Google's John Mueller discusses what Sitemaps are good for and says: Recognizing preferred URLs for canonicalization (there are ...


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No. That is not what the sitemap is designed for. I agree that it would be nice if we could communicate more through the sitemap and that the current function of the sitemap could be extended to be more helpful for both the webmaster and the search engines. That being what it may, you use the site map to tell search engines what pages you want indexed. ...


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Keeping links for content you do not have pollutes searches and should be punished. Ask yourself how many users looking for that content will prefer to visit your explanation that you removed it rather then find the actual content on another site? Bringing visitors to your site and not delivering them what they want is not good SEO, most will not stay to ...


0

You mean that you are still appearing broken link on Google searches. And you want to completely remove those pages from Google searches then you must go to webmaster tool & get verified your website through webmaster. After that Go into the Google Index tab & then you will see the subtab of remove URL. You can submit the link to completely remove ...


1

Neither option will get you a penalty. Google prefers 404's but your single page idea will help to identify to users why the link is broken. Either way it is your choice. Both are perfectly fine. If it were up to me, I would give the user some explanation.


2

Yes, sitemap index files can refer to mRSS files, but you can also submit them individually if you want. You can't link to mRSS files from normal (non-index) sitemap files though. In addition to the help center page you mentioned, there's also a bit about the differences between these files in an older blog post.


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Those pages are not high quality pages. Who would want to land on page five of unanswered questions on this site? Nobody. These are low quality pages because: They only a list made of of content found elsewhere on your site. If a user does land on this type of page, they have to click to the content. Even if a user does want a list of this type of ...


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Not sure if you saw this. Here is a guide from Google describing tactics for your seperated mobile URL situation: Method for mobile with 2 URL's Basically you set the desktop site as canonical, and mobile as alternate, then use tags to point bots to either-or mode using a preferred hierarchy. Do almost the same for sitemap, only you can use rel and ...


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Reply to question 1: As the domains are different, in this case, one domain and one subdomain I suppose the sites are different too and therefore you should have one sitemap for your Desktop site and one for the Mobile version of it in the same way that you should add Google Webmaster code and verify both sites independently, thus allowing you to submit ...


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No, you can't submit the exact same sitemap (same syntax, same URLs), and expect Google to sort out what kinds of assets you're trying to identify. If you submit a sitemap that you intend to be for your videos, and it doesn't have the required Video sitemap syntax, and contain the required video-specific tags, Google won't see it as a video sitemap. It's ...



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