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7

Just checking sitemap.xml is not enough. There are several reasons that that check might fail even though the site has a sitemap. Did you check sitemap.xml.gz? Google supports gzip of sitemaps. Large sites with large sitemaps are likely to take advantage of this feature. You can specify the name of the sitemap file in robots.txt. It doesn't have to be ...


6

You are asking two questions here. Does a sitemap need to be XML? The simple answer is no, it doesn't have to be XML. It can be XML file, a text file or RSS/Atom feed (which is basically XML), HTML Sitemap HTML Sitemaps: These are used on your website to display the layout in layers on your website to any customer that would wish too (don't know why they ...


5

You have the incorrect URLs in your sitemap.xml files. The URLs you list in the sitemap are actually being 301 redirected to different URLs. e.g: The link you posted: http://www.proboxinggear.com/store/product_info.php?products_id=28 is 301 redirecting to: http://www.proboxinggear.com/store/amber-heavybag-stand-with-adjustable-speedbag-platform-p-28.html ...


5

First you should address how search engines crawl your site and avoid duplicate content issues by making sure you have the www subdomain (www.example.com) redirecting to your root domain (example.com). The most efficient way to do this is to create a DNS record - see the first example here on how. You should also use your web server's configuration to ...


5

The purpose of sitemaps is to tell the search engines about the pages in your website that you want them to crawl and index. If new pages are added to your site that you want crawled and indexed then they should be added to your sitemap. If this is occurring daily then you can add them daily. If this is occurring weekly then you can add them weekly. Search ...


4

A single XML sitemap should not contain a mix of HTTP and HTTPS URLs (i.e. essentially different locations as far as the search engines are concerned). So, the sitemap located at http://example.com/Sitemap.xml should only contain URLs starting http://example.com/ and similar for the HTTPS sitemap. From sitemaps.org: Q: My site has both "http" and ...


4

From https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/156184?hl=en Sitemaps are a way to tell Google about pages on your site we might not otherwise discover. This means you don't need a sitemap if you don't want Google to discover anything. Having a sitemap won't do anything so I wouldn't make one at all.


4

In your header you have a canonical link (on line 11, just under <title>). It looks like this on your page: <link href="http://escene.ir/component/products/?task=view.12" rel="canonical" /> This element tells Google your preferred URL for a page which has several urls to choose from. This is to prevent you from being penalized for having ...


3

From Google: If your site targets users in many languages and, optionally, countries, you can use Sitemaps to provide Google with rel="alternate" hreflang="x". These annotations help Google serve the correct language or regional URL to searchers. That article will tell you more about how to do that. (Summary of that article just in case it moves or is ...


3

Google's John Mueller posted an excellent answer to the question: Are there any clear indicators that my sitemap file is beneficial? He says that sitemaps are only used for content discovery and updates. They are not used directly for ranking purposes. The rankings of content that isn't in your sitemap won't suffer. You also won't get any of the side ...


3

You should register your site twice in Google Webmaster Tools. Once without the www and once with it. The two often show different errors and different pages indexed. It is useful to know all about your site, not just what you can see with one or the other. You should then choose one or the other to be the canonical site. Make it so that users have to ...


3

Yes, change them to the new URLs. Although the 301 redirects tell the search engines where to find moved pages you shouldn't be feeding them inaccurate information about your web pages. Besides possibly being error prone, it may also be an indicator of quality. While this may not affect your rankings, it may possibly affect crawl rate and other related ...


3

Sitemap files are a type of XML text file. Open the file with a text editor, remove the section that you don't want, and re-save the file. If you don't want the spider that crawled your site to generate that sitemap to put the pages in to begin with, you could edit your robots.txt file to block certain pages: User-Agent: * Disallow: ...


3

As explained in this Google reference, the sitemaps listed in the robots.txt are not displayed in the Google Webmaster Tools. Was your Sitemap submitted using ping or robots.txt? Only Sitemaps submitted using Webmaster Tools are listed on the Sitemaps page. To make sure your Sitemap information is visible, it's a good idea to use Webmaster Tools to ...


3

You don't have to use GWT to make Google aware of an XML sitemap. It's just one of the ways they make available to webmasters but isn't the only way or a required way. You can use robots.txt to accomplish this as well.


3

If you have two verified sites (verified in Webmaster Tools) means you can have a single sitemap. If you have multiple websites, you can simplify the process of creating and submitting Sitemaps by creating one or more Sitemaps that includes URLs for all your verified sites, and saving the Sitemap(s) to a single location. All sites must ...


3

According to Google, you should list your AJAX URLs in a sitemap exactly as you say you've done: "4. Consider updating your Sitemap to list the new AJAX URLs Crawlers use Sitemaps to complement their discovery crawl. Your Sitemap should include the version of your URLs that you'd prefer to have displayed in search results, so in most cases it would ...


3

Baidu has a Webmaster Tools application that is written in Chinese. But all is not lost. Here is a tutorial: http://www.webnots.com/baidu-webmaster-tools.html The tutorial is written in English and translates the options for you. I am not sure how up to date this is, but it does look complete otherwise and may be useful. I do not see that Baidu reads the ...


2

Unfortunately, only sitemap_index's can have other sitemap's in them. You have two options as far as I can tell: You could add a sitemap_index, and then link to your other two sitemaps from there. You could just add both of your sitemaps to your robots.txt file (more info) Alternatively, you could also disregard both of the above and just submit each of ...


2

You'll want both in the root of the site, especially robots.txt because that's where Bot's will be looking for it. The Sitemap could go anywhere, but it would make the most sense in your case to put it in the root, rather than having several sitemaps for each additional language you add in the future.


2

For an average website that supports both rel="canonical" links for both m.domain.com and www.domain.com should only ever need to use 1 sitemap by using Annotation in Sitemaps. So even if your website is responsive or supports both using different URL you should only ever need to use one sitemap (for standard sites). Now since your question is about ...


2

I wouldn't worry about "cloaking" on files that are meant only for the consumption of robots. Showing a 403 Forbidden status when the user-agent isn't Googlebot should be fine on a sitemap file. Google cares about cloaking when users see different results than Googlebot. In this case, Google is never going to refer users to the sitemap at all. I often ...


2

As long as I can remember, Google has always capped the number of results that are given on any on search, so if you was to search for a "keyword" then the limit would be 1,000 this rule also applies to site: query. However Google site: does report the total number of pages found within the search at the top of the search.... But.... This number a lot of ...


2

Using a sitemap specific to your mobile content will help Google crawl and index URL's for mobile content. This should be a separate sitemap from your non-mobile content, as stated by Google here. A sample mobile sitemap supplied by Google is: <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" ?> <urlset xmlns="http://www.sitemaps.org/schemas/sitemap/0.9" ...


2

Adding a mobile sitemap won't hurt anything, though as you have canonical tags pointing to the desktop version of the pages then you won't see proper index stats in Webmaster Tools. Also, the site:search might be showing no pages because they have already been consolidated into the desktop versions. Your log files would show if Google had crawled these pages ...


2

All you need are posts and pages in the sitemap file to give Google a pathway to your entire site's content. You should only include category and tag archives if your site is reasonably active which will guarantee that the content there will rotate frequently enough to not be considered duplicate. If you are not an active site (defined as daily or near ...


2

Here is Google's documentation on multiple sitemaps The most likely cause of your error is that you have not verified each of the sites using webmaster tools. I would suggest that you: Verify each site Let Google know about the sitemap for each site Put it in each robots.txt file OR submit the same sitemap under each site in webmaster tools If you ...


2

Those pages are usually not available to search engines because they require a user to actively add items to a cart and then provide information to continue along the purchasing process. Search engines will not complete that process and as a result should never be able to reach those pages. If your site is built well, anyone with an empty cart should never ...


2

I can see three possible courses of action: If having old events still listed in search engines is important, then it could be worth leaving them in your sitemap. This would be handy if your events are likely to be searched for from outside your site (e.g. in Google). If you want to keep the pages available to users on your site but you don't need them ...


2

First up, you definitely shouldn't put JSON files is a sitemap as they are meaningless to a search engine, which wants web pages. It wouldn't make sense for a user to land on your /Content/goldenglobes.json file. So if the site stays exactly as it is, then a sitemap provides zero benefit. However, if you are loading in content with JavaScript you may wish ...



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