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27

You will need to have quite a bit of traffic to your site to get those. Keep creating great content. Google will not give those out easy. Be sure that you have your navigation marked up with semantic HTML and include an id of nav or navigation on your menu. This will help Google know what links are your navigation. (as opposed to a list of links). Also, ...


12

Excerpt from Googler Maile Ohye's explanation on Sitelinks in Google Webmaster Help - Sitelinks are often produced when there's a high probability that the site is the top match for the user's query. In other words, to have sitelinks ... you'll probably need to be the definitive first result Sitelinks are completely automated & based on ...


7

As far as I know the official term is just sitelinks. That's what google calls them: http://support.google.com/webmasters/bin/answer.py?hl=en&topic=8523&answer=47334. Also, here is a good article on the topic and they are called sitelinks as well. http://www.click-finders.com/blog/how-to-get-google-sitelinks-on-your-serp-listing/


7

Here is a guide to using RDFa to get the most out of Rich Snippets, however, it sounds as though you may be referring to Site Links (please clarify if you are referring to neither).


6

Sitelinks are usually taken from the home page. Make sure Google is able to see those links; if your website used heavy JavaScript to construct the DOM it's possible that Google simply doesn't see any link. To see if this is the case open your website with a command line (no GUI) web browser, such as links (Linux). Alternatively, try to disable JavaScript ...


5

You may also maintain a footer that is rich in (text) links; make sure you use good labels. You can think of the footer as a subset of your complete sitemap. This might suggest Google that those links / contents are quite important since they are repeated across the site (assuming all pages have the same footer). Removal of sitelinks is more ...


4

In order to remove particular categories in the Sitelinks result: Go to your Google Webmaster Tools account Click Sitelinks which is under Search Appearance section. Give the link of your category that want to remove in **Demote this sitelink URL:** area Likewise give all your links to remove from Sitelinks. You can't add any particular categories ...


3

Some PDFs are generated in a way that makes it very hard to extract the content. You can usually tell by highlighting some of the text, and copy & pasting it into a text-file. When you do that with this file, it shows the same gibberish. It's possible that just re-generating the PDF will help, potentially using a different PDF creator / driver. There ...


3

A quick answer is: No, it does not hurt you (see answers like this: Does Google still recommend 100 links or fewer per page? ). Some sites with huge dropdown navs outsource the navigation to javascript and an external library, to keep the main HTML page smaller (and probably, but not necessarily the links from being recognized by the Google bot), but your's ...


3

I have a site localized into over forty languages and have no problem with my site links. You don't state what url structure your two sites are in. Google recommends that your internationalized sites be on separate top level domains (example.com vs example.es), different sub-domains (www.example.com vs es.example.com), or different folders ...


3

I think that the search box appears at the discretion of Google and their algorithms, but I have heard that having a CSE set up for your site can increase the likelihood that the box will appear, though this hasn't helped with any of my sites.


3

Based on my experience and my understanding of how javascript works, the Google Analytics code only records data related to the moment the user first loads the page and the javascript is run. So if a user only looks at one page, they would have a time on site of 00:00:00, regardless of how long they looked at a page. The GA code has no way of knowing when ...


3

Visit the Google Webmaster Tools section on sitelinks (under "Site Configuration"), which allows you to demote various sitelinks. This won't allow you to choose which sitelinks appear on your website, but it may decrease the likelihood that Google will select a particular page on your site as a sitelink.


3

You can have two or more links from one page A to a page B. There is no issue here. You are not going to be penalized. There is no need to avoid duplicate links to same page. Your SEO guy is wrong.


3

Duplicate links is not an SEO issue unless someone is doing page rank sculpting, in which case use rel=nofollow on the duplicate link (though I really wouldn't bother as I don't think this works any more, and it was of negligible benefit when it did.) If you mean is a # on the end of a URL counted as a separate page, then no it is not. It is an anchor to ...


3

Your PHP code isn't modifying the robots.txt file. You've merely commented out the link to the page. Try creating a robots.txt file in the main public directory of your website. Then add the following: User-Agent: * Disallow: /terms-and-conditions/ You could also add a noindex meta tag to the file in question: <meta name="robots" ...


3

If that extra info is purely for visual purposes then you could perhaps consider using CSS Pseudo content (I think Google will ignore it but haven't tested so could be wrong on that) As a side point though, it looks like almost all of those elements duplicate the text above it so I just wonder whether it's actually adding any value to your users or whether ...


2

CSS directives: a.abbrev span { display:none; } Links: <a href="..." title="Full Text" class="abbrev">FT<span> (Full Text)</span></a> Updates: ... a less ugly solution and why other avenues of exploration will probably not yield the desired results. CSS directives: a.abbrev span { display:block; float:left; width:1em; ...


2

Because they are two different sets of search results. In local search your site meets the criteria to receive sitelinks as Google considers it to be an authoritative source (you come #1 for me). But in international search you are not (you come #3 for me).


2

Linking to your forum on every page in your site won't get you into any kind of trouble SEO-wise. That's normal for important parts of a website and site navigation. So don't change this or set them to nofollow (which should never be used for internal links). I'd be surprised if the most recent forum posts on your home page caused your issue at least as a ...


2

It depends hugely on how quickly Google deals with the updated information. For example: I specified on my sitemap that my site changes daily and i posted a topic on my site but it doesn't appear on the search results even when i included my sites whole name on the query. After 3 days it appeared on Google so i changed the title of my topic and after 3 ...


2

I have not found any way to adjust sitelinks, or even whether they are included or not. According to this page (http://support.google.com/webmasters/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=47334) Google says the entire process is automated, and all you can do is 'demote' a page for up to 90 days at a time, so you do have the ability to remove a sitelink from your ...


2

You should be fine with noindexing the page, as there is no legal requirement to have T&C pages indexed (nor even included on a site). However you might want to do a back link check and check traffic to the page in GA first; perhaps people are linking to the page (unlikely) or it gets a lot of traffic and this could be why it keeps getting picked? If ...


2

category archive pages with a description, an image and the relevant posts. You'll be just fine. Having the description in the archive pages and changing text below it as you generate new posts is perfectly acceptable behavior and you should not see any penalties or drawbacks UNLESS you change the category names and/or permalinks schema in the future. ...


2

I checked your homepage source code to see if the 2nd step (putting the schema.org markup on your homepage) has been followed. That snippet is not yet implemented. Doing so will make your site an eligible candidate for displaying the site search bar on Google search results.


2

When I have demoted site links, it has taken less than 24 hours for them to disappear from the search results. I have never gotten a notification that it was successful. The demotions I've put in are still listed in Google Webmaster Tools years later. It looks like they expire eventually. One of the ones I put in first now says that it will expire in ...


2

As you can see, it sees the content as plain text, no matter if there's a span. It will see the same as a user does, only you have made a visual change to the span to create a distinction. However, the headers they show you in your image should be taken from the pages themselves, not from the anchor. You might want to check if you have proper ...


2

<span> tags don't generally add white space around elements. It looks like you may be using your CSS to make it so. Text browsers and Google are not likely to add space around spans, however. It would be better in your markup to put in a space: Try & Buy <span class="subline">Hosting List</span> Instead of: Try & ...


2

As others have noted, Google sees your sitelinks as is they were all in plain text — it does not generally take style sheets into account. (Indeed, Google cannot really format the sitelinks the way you have them styled on your site, and there's nothing that would tell it how it should format them instead.) One solution you might consider would be to ...


1

Go to your Google Webmaster Tools account. On left navigation under Search Appearance click on Sitelinks and remove the links you don't want to appear under search results. Sitelinks are automatically generated links that may appear under your site's search results. Learn more. If you don't want a page to appear as a sitelink, you can demote it. Only site ...



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