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The problem with this setup is that two requests are made to the server. One to load the initial HTML and one to load the actual data through AJAX. This alone can be enough to create a negative impact on SEO especially if all of the required content to be presented on the screen requires AJAX. Also you mentioned your site takes a few seconds to load. This ...


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I originally read you question as the number of indexed pages from your sitemap is 1500 and that you are worried. Then I thought about it. Perhaps there are things you need to know. If your site is new, then it will take quite a while for a new site to be indexed. I am not sure how old your site is, but it can take as much as a year for some sites to sink ...


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Try to make text more english, especially the text in the title tag, and in Webmaster tools, select the website domain, then the gear icon, then "site settings" then for crawl rate select "Limit Google's maximum crawl rate" and select the right-most point on the slider that appears so that Google can scan your site faster. Just make sure you don't have ...


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Actually setting the hreflang in the .com as you suggest - is a way to go. Hreflang is setted on page by page basis, so if the FAQ is the only page in the .sa domain in English - you must set it as en-SA just for that page. The cleanest way is to set hreflang for the whole website, as it's the same company anyway. Just ensure you use the language right ...


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Duplicate content is no longer determined in a linear fashion. Today, duplicate content is determined using a semantic scoring method so that near duplicate content will still be seen as duplicate. This is because spammers would simply rearrange the content to avoid content as being flagged as duplicate. As well, n-gram phrase recognition is used to ...


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1) Which ever page is referenced as the canonical is the one that will show in SERP's. The other will likely not. 2) If the content of the page is very similar or identical, yes it is duplicate content. The domain hosting the content is irrelevant. 3) No, hreflang is used to specify pages where the content is the same, but in alternate languages. In your ...


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From the very beginning, Google primarily utilized three perspectives when using semantics and ranking: one, link text and value to the target page; two, the title tag of the target page; and three, the content itself. One of the interesting research results the project found was that performing a search against the title tag was about 2% more effective than ...


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Google does not appear to index text in .svg image files. I have created an SEO experiment for you. I: put three paragraphs of text in an SVG image saved that as a .svg file embedded the image in a new web page using <img src= waited a week to see what Google indexed Google did not index the text in the image at all. The text on the new page ...


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You have done your research and seem to have a good handle on the situation. To sum up: Using robots.txt would prevent search engines from crawling the PDF files. If third party sites linked directly to the PDF files, then search engines might include the URLs in the search index (but would still not be able to index their contents.) Using X-Robots-Tag ...


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If your default language is /it, then make example.com/it as your default home page with italic content. Show appropriate version of content for your users. Regrading example.com English content will be best practice for users


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No its not same. Google will count img01231 as <ALT> or <title> name for new image. Basically 301 redirect passes link juice not such things.


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It will be better if you put focus to remove bad content on priority. As Google confirmed few days back, Google penguin is just a month away. So I believe it will help your website, if you will remove all the bad content at once.


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Yes, although I'm not sure how to measure the negatives. Essentially you will lose out on SEO by not having the pictures on your site; image searches do drive traffic, although the amount can be very minimal. If you host the images, you also have control over their naming conventions, which you can utilize for them to perform well in image searches. ...


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No- not generally. These have no specific search value in normal cases with some exception. Programmers use word boundaries to separate terms of value in a string and would normally only use special characters if they have meaning. Special characters have no value when making text search matches except where there appears to be a special meaning. For ...


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Your question has to dimension to take into consideration. handling multiple languages handling duplicates Handling multiple languages Organizing language versions in subdirectories is a good strategy. For me it is best practise. If you are able to identify which language/country your user is looking for redirect him to the right directory. If not - ...


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If you visit www.example.com it will redirect you to either www.example.com/uk or www.example.com/ie or www.example.com/global. It is a good idea to have separate folders since you want to omit redirects. Just don't ask google to index pages from www.example.com directly. Only ask it to index the pages from folders within www.example.com/uk, ...


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So as you said in your Question: The %2bis only the Unicode representation of / so everything (i mean computers) will read here also a / because i will be encoded into the internal Character-Encoding ... so it is only a representation an will not affect you SEO - it's not beautiful for your humans. So far - I'm sorry that I'm not allowed to talk more about ...


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There is no clear rule that says you may not use a string instead a nested place. But as Google wants you to deliver the most reliable data they post an error on their testing tool. In my experience Google wants you to use a proper location. Therefore a real life address delivered like in the Google guide is requested: <script ...


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I'm pretty sure the URL can be completely different, and that would also make sense as you might actually use the different languages in the URLs. Also you can use them cross domain where the entire domain would be different. I haven't seen in any of Google guidelines where they stipulate they must be similar. The idea is that the content on the pages is ...


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As Su` suggested there is a legal process for this. They are ultimately domain name squatting and there are clear rules for domain name resolution stating how to go about it and that Trademarks for example are used to support the process - the aim of this is to force the other party to hand over the domain name which is in your company's name. The domain ...


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Google just stated they would not make any differences between the different domain extensions. With the exception of ccTLDs when it comes to geotargeting. The new local gTLDs, such as .london and .berlin, however, will be treated as gTLDs and not as ccTLDs (or whatever we might call them one day). For further reference, please see ...


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No, not at all. but they are not very good as well, as they don't carry any SEO value. Besides, they're not as powerful as cTLDs or TLDs, both have some value associated to them. Like cTLDs clarifies that these domains are in close association with particular geo location. and TLDs specified if the domain is for commercial purpose, etc.


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Google published this today which answers this question well and in detail. With the coming of many new generic top level domains (gTLDs), we'd like to give some insight into how these are handled in Google's search. We’ve heard and seen questions and misconceptions about the way we treat new top level domains (TLDs), like .guru, .how, or any of ...


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Just to add to the above post, i would recommend signing up for Bing webmaster tools http://www.bing.com/toolbox/webmaster as well 1) Verify your website in both Google and bing webmaster tools. In yoast there is an option for adding the bing and google verification codes;) 2) Add your sitemap.xml to your website settings within bing and google webmaster ...


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Its a slightly longer process that the 3 options you've suggested, although still doable. Blogspot won't allow 301 redirects, so you can't simply redirect the whole site + link juice. You will need to tell Google that the duplicate content (i.e. your new site - assuming you have copied all content over already) is the most relevant. You do this using the ...


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Just to make sure the google bots aren't gonna play a picky move, if you have a landing page, you might want to add a few more words to the page other than just the list of languages to choose from. Perhaps give a simple welcome message to the (insert website name here) in all the languages. At least then Google won't label the page as "thin content". ...


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Possibly, but its more of the question of how does it impact the browsers all of your website guests are using. Theres a chance that one will at least one will read the HTML sequentially from top to bottom and as it comes across a src attribute of the image tag, it requests the file from the server. Do this 10x and the requests will be made 10x by such ...


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Splash screens are acceptable according to Google. They do offer some best practices however, when using multi-language/multi-regional sites. In this article, Google recommends the use of the hreflang tag within <link rel="alternate" ... /> tag in the head. The specific excerpt from the article is below: For language/country selectors or ...


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Yes, the file name matters, it affects SEO, and it will rank you. We have a top image bar preview thing position in a very huge search query simply because of the file name. There is no alt on it, and the Google image search preview lists no text. The image we used is a stock photo, so there are thousands of sites that also use it, but G prefers ours. It ...


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The idea is usually to track such clicks and remove the SEO benefit. Most such links will not be counted by Google and will not have a direct SEO benefit for your site. Even if Google does process the JS redirect script and discovers your linked page via such a redirect, it wouldn't give it the benefit of being counted as a regular plain-text editorial link ...


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Google+ pages certainly helps if its a new domain, also get on Bing places if your not on there already, tweet and post a bit and im sure within a few weeks you should start appearing for the full search term. Maybe rename your about page called nsnj.com/new-start-new-jersey and put in a rewrite from the existing URL to the new-start-new-jersey page. Maybe ...


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Its very easy to implement a clean page structure, so by not having a h1 or by having two h1s on a page with irrelevant keywords is just simply lazy coding. You can argue how much or little it would effect a page rank, but surely the simple argument is a h1,h2,h3 page structure was invented for a reason, otherwise it wouldn't exist. In SEO everyone can ...


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That does not look like a dip due to an algorithmic penalty or change. It is more likely a glitch - either in your code, your server settings or in Googlebot crawling your site. Your first port of call when trouble-shooting this is to double-check that nothing was changes on your site - especially no erroneous robots.txt code, no major directory name / URL ...


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Before structured data Google preferred microformats. They still do, but for things like last modified, quick overview of categories, site content update status, or other legacy knowns. It's almost real time, very quick index changes, with hubs to boot. Very much better to have these rather than ETAGS or 304 + AI trying to figure relevant changes. ...


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Yes, clicking on a SERP result can change ranking. No, its not that easy and results won't stick [permanently] by spam clicking it via 1 endpoint because Google has very advanced abuse/proxy/tracking abilities. True you may see the SERP rise, but it is probably introvertive and could be due to you being logged into G+, G account, your browser signature, ...


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The google structured data policy describes a few exceptions such as including machine readable data to avoid ambiguity (dates, prices, etc). What is actually says it that the extra meta tags of hidden information are not displayed which suggests they may still be useful in search results although the extra data won't preview. The better solution would be ...


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In short: In using a CDN you are basically making identical copies of your content across the network. Although a CNAME with the same domain (but different subdomain as in cdn.domain.tld) definitely helps and much likely will not trigger duplicate content issues. A good way to avoid duplicate content issues is to make use of the "rel canonical" tag. By ...


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Click-through has always been in huge debate and no one actually knows for sure how much influence it holds, because its one of thousands of Google's secrets. But what I can tell you is that Google will know its you doing the clicking therefore you are not as a treated as unique visitor. They know its you through cookies and your ip address.


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This is a very complex question, it depends on the length of your domain name and the length of your post titles. Generally I recommend /%postname%/ because the length of your post name could be long. If it is too long it will loose both SEO value and user experience value...


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The WordPress Loop is an internal feature of WordPress and therefore has no effect on Google or any other major search engine. However, elements outside of the loop that are repeated on every page will be treated differently to what the main content is, this is normal and effects all websites no matter the platform they decide to use.


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It depends on how strong the competitors in the UK are. If Google finds enough trusted sources in the UK (or UK-specific pages, eg international websites with a /en-GB/ section and the proper hreflang annotation), chances are that this could affect your visibility in the UK negatively. However, if your site is the most trusted source for your topic, it ...


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Yes you can use the same URL for multiple locations, John Muller from Google replied in the comments to a similar question here: How should I approach sitemap.xml, hreflang and regions for my website Yes, you can use the same URL for multiple locations. Not sure on the correct answer for this one.


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As of 2015 wikipedia uses https for all connections To ensure that Wikipedia users can share in the world’s knowledge more securely, the Wikimedia Foundation is implementing HTTPS, to encrypt all traffic on Wikimedia sites. http://blog.wikimedia.org/2015/06/12/securing-wikimedia-sites-with-https/ Linking from secure connections to non-https sites ...


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Best practice is the shorter/cleaner URL's, the better. Repeating 'car-report' is just unnecessary and there is little point implementing anything on a website which will have no benefit to the end user or a search engine. That being said, it is unlikely going to cause a negative impact unless it was excessive/spammy (not so in your provided example).


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You definitely want the canonical to point to the URL where the content exists and is served, that is the point of the canonical. You also should consider the pros and cons of re writing the URL suffix via htaccess. If the rewrite is for SEO purposes then you should probably leave the page as HTML, even if the rest of the site is asp out other tech. Google ...


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To answer your question, "Yes", Google will ignore the canonical tag. However, this isn't an ideal situation at all and will only cause you trouble in the long run. If you have no way to edit / remove the canonical tags, why not use one of the standard default file names (index, default, home) always and then you can maintain that file URL for online ...


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The second option is the better one - both from an SEO and organisation of data point of view.


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You should definitely go back to the original format. And no, Google won't penalise you for that - mistakes happen and based on what you said, you aren't trying to game the algorithm or spam Google. In fact, if you check Webmaster Tools, you should start seeing duplicate title notifications and suggestions from Google to differentiate your Title tags. ...


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There appears to be two things going on. Google may/will change the SERP link if certain conditions occur: one, the title length is too long; two, the title length is too short; three, the pipe character is used as a separator; four, branding can be detected. This is just a rough list but enough for us today. In your case, you are using the pipe character ...


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The following is from the perspective of the HTML5 specification, based on the assumption that consumers (like search engines) will expect and work with what is specified in the HTML standards. In current practice, such markup details probably don’t matter much for SEO, but it can be important for other consumers and accessibility. I’ll use headings of the ...



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