New answers tagged

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Google robot is text crawler - so it can't "see" image (ony the code of image). But big image could slow down you page - and that can give you some negative ratings (you can measure it here https://developers.google.com/speed/pagespeed/insights/) On the other hand there is User Experience ( you are creating website for people, not for robot) , ...


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First step is to report the spam to Google, additionally you can do a whois search on the domains and report the spam to the registrar, most registrars have anti spam policies.


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Google will penalize pages with an excessive number of ads but you can have up to three ad blocks with no penalty (based on AdSense policy). As for page load it does effect pagerank but not a ridiculously huge amount compared to how content affects it.


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Yes and no. It is content that ranks and image tags offer some to the total performance of the page, however, it is limited. Where your friend is right is engagement. Google looks for elements that offer engagement. An image is the most basic engagement there is. At one point, Google was not shy about saying that an image should exist at the top of the ...


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Simple anwser is : Install some redirect plugin that use header 301 (for example https://wordpress.org/plugins/redirection/) and simply redirect non-existed links (get a list form google search console) to existing content. This will reduce 404 errors ,and you will not lose movement on site


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In general it might be a good idea to block crawling of search result pages, but there are cases where it can makes sense to allow crawling. For example, if your search is the only or the primary way to navigate the site, and especially if you offer filters (or search operators) with pre-defined search terms. So instead of having a separate /category/ ...


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I could design something for you using link attribution where essentially every link has an id attached as an attribute, and then we use a javascript function to track and ID and the clicks. We could then graph it out in real time on a backend page. Man that would be badass! <a href="example.com" id="header-link" onClick=example()>example</a> ...


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This is a difficult question because even with hreflang markup, Google doesn't always excuse duplicate content. So the trick is to make the content sufficiently different. For online stores, this is actually easy. Include pricing info in the relevant currency (GBP/USD) and use schema.org markup for product, pricing, availability, shipping attributes. The ...


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This is domain cannibalism and it's a common SEO tactic. There's actually not a problem with the different design, so long as it's optimised. Run it through all the standard page tests, and bring it's quality up or above that of your original content. Here's a run down of domain merging: Pros: You acquire a percentage of the original domains link equity. ...


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A sitemap is so that Google can index your pages without having to scrape and investigate every internal link. If you want something indexed, it should be in there. If you don't want it indexed - robots.txt it. It doesn't matter if you use multiple sitemaps or a single large file. There's no limits, advantages, disadvantages outside of management.


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It has to do with the value of the page. If you Google for "tools" you're more likely to get "Home Depot" than search results with a wall of tools. I have some theatre companies I work with. If you search for some of the actors who have played parts, you will get the theatre company production page and not the actor's page. As far as Bing goes, well, ...


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According to Google, SEO Doesn't depend Upon the Meta tags Keyword. And Google bots will never have a look at it. But many SEO experts suggest using the Meta Keyword tag. And To The answer of Your question, you can use the keywords any no of times as long as they are a different phrase. But there's a word limit on keywords. And also make a practice to ...


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Right now, definitely myth. We know that Google reads CSS and JavaScript to "see" a page as a user does. Previously, almost certainly myth. As far as I know, having navigation above content has always been conventional in web design. To design a search engine that doesn't take account of this and even treats it as a negative would seem odd.


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This is a good and specific question! I have answered this questions in parts all over the place, however, this question is specific enough to warrant it's own answer which will be very direct and helpful to others. First things first. Search is NOT about keywords. Google does not make direct term matches. Not even close. So please stop thinking in terms ...


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Search pages should be disallowed from crawling with the robots.txt see John Mullers comment on What is a best canonical URL for a search result page? thanks dan!


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If you are determined to post that, the method you describe is the way to go. Whether or not you get any traction for it is a different question.


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Google's algorithm's are smart enough to know when a site is using a sidebar to display repeated content and you will not suffer a duplicate content penalty for displaying event information there. As to whether or not the algorithm will rank you well, that's a question that we can't answer because indexing/ranking is the result of numerous variables.


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<h1> states it's the main heading. That's enough information for Google. If you care about SEO, you should probably have the <title> tag in your <head> section match as closely as possible your H1. How you style it is not an issue - provided you don't do dubious things like hiding the tag using CSS (display: none), or place other DOM ...


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If you end up splitting up the breadcrumb from the H1 tag like closetnoc suggested in the comments (which is a good idea I think), I think you're still left with the problem where you stated, "My site looks good. But putting a big heading at the top doesn't look as nice." In that case, I would still use the H1 tag (as you realize is very important) and ...


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yes Google does not guarantee to show structure data in search results and what I have observed Google generally show structure data for some of the particular categories like for products, events, books, movies etc.


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There is no use to put meta descriptions tag on noindex pages


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In short, Google don't guarantee Rich Snippets will be shown even if correctly coded. Google does not guarantee that Rich Snippets will show up for search results from a particular site even if structured data is marked up and can be extracted successfully according to the testing tool. ...


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Short answer: No, there isn't, and in fact it might be a detriment. Longer answer: You're asking the wrong question. Bear with me for a moment here :) Google does its best to understand your site in a way that visitors to it will. It's only a bot, but it's pretty clever and the algorithms are constantly being updated. If you want to game Google, it ...


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You can set the canonical link on your article to be your website, so that any SEO benefits will be redirected there. The only caveat it seems, is that you need to use Medium's import tools. Here is a page from Medium talking about it. https://help.medium.com/hc/en-us/articles/217991468-Duplicate-Content-and-SEO


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It is recommended to keep a sitemap.xml up-to-date and free of errors*. If you merge the content of www.example.com/one-yellow.html and www.example.com/one-yellow-means.html into www.example.com/one.html you probably (ideally) redirect them both to www.example.com/one.html. Other URLs that have been removed may serve an HTTP status 404 (not foud) or ...


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Does Google just put that "First -" itself? Nope. Otherwise where might that be coming from? There are several things you will need to check since this is WordPress. All of them are misconfigurations of one kind or another Check your plugins to see if you have an SEO helper such as All in One SEO, Platinum SEO or Yoast SEO. if you have one, ...


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THE MOST IMPORTANT CONSIDERATION is support for edns-client-subnet. No amount of pops, fast storage and http/2 support will speed up your site if your clients are not directed to the nearest pop.


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First off, please stop thinking in terms of keywords. I assure you that Google does not match keywords. The process is far more sophisticated than simply seeing if a term exists. In fact, term matches are not done. Semantic topic matches are however. So stop thinking in terms of keywords. It is a waste. Think topic. The URL can be divided into 4 basic ...


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The fewer the parameters in your dynamic URL, the better. One or two parameters is much better than seven or eight. Avoid superfluous/nonessential parameters like tracking codes. A static looking URL (containing no ampersands, equals signs, or question marks) is more search optimal than a dynamic one. Having keywords in the URL is more optimal than no ...


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You need to use a 404/410 response so that once users have closed their profiles, they can remove from search result pages if they wish. They would not be able to do this with a redirect.


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301 might not be the right choice as it is for permanent redirect. It should be used when a requested resource has been moved permanently to a new URL and any future references to this resource should use one of the returned URLs which is not the case. 302 (or 303) may be the better choice for redirection. You may also refer to difference between 302 and ...


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Looks like this was because of Google experimenting something. Today when searching with the same keyword Google displays the description as expected, everything shown from beginning and trimming last few words. We did not changed anything during this entire time on the website so it was definitely from Google's end. Thank you for your help.


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Yes. The definition of the href attribute for the link element says: […] must contain a valid non-empty URL potentially surrounded by spaces This links to the definition of valid non-empty URL, which links to the definition of valid URL, which says that is has to be a URL that conforms to the authoring conformance requirements in the URL standard ...


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This happens to just about everyone somewhere along the line. I had made a bad/silly mistake in an algorithm that detected bad bots and resulted in about 24,000 pages that told Google that it was a bad bot. Kinda funny when you think about it! You are not penalized. Your pages rank should all come back just fine. You were just serving the wrong page. Once ...


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Looks like it. It even looks like Google recommends using pushShate and prefers it over hash bangs.


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If possible do always use absolute links instead of relative ones. Why? Because relative links may cause crawl errors. Especially when it comes to alternate links you should make sure the bot finds exactly the URL you want it to crawl. Further it is not a good idea to use parameters for language indication. Please visit the following guides on multi ...


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Google will still crawl the page, but if there is information about your page on dmoz, Google wont display that information on it's search result page. One source Google uses to generate snippets is the Open Directory Project. You can direct us not to use this as a source by adding a meta tag to your pages. To prevent all search engines (that ...


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Looks like it. This example comes from the HTML5 specs: For example, the following link is a French translation that uses the PDF format: <link rel=alternate type=application/pdf hreflang=fr href=manual-fr>


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When Google fetches a page, it is immediately stored within the index. This is where the cache comes from. The page is indexed. When you do a site: search, this is NOT a reliable indication of whether the page is indexed or not. The reason for this is simple. The process is not simple. There is a fair amount of work that has to be done before a page will ...


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When Google fetches any page, the first thing it does is store the code. The reason for this is simple. Google needs to process your web page in different ways at different times and it is far better to reference your page from it's index than to fetch it each and every time. This is where the cache comes from. If you see that the cache does not look as ...


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If you search site:http://darker.github.io in Google it will show properly. Why it is showing Auto-client in general search is, that text "auto client" is H1 and many headings consists of word "auto", and also the text "LOL league of legends" is not optimized properly. It is the crawler's tendency to assume proper heading and serve. In this case it ...


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So with the help of @Quentin & this link that was provided, I got enough to answer to my question. It's recommended not to use the escaped fragment convention And if you are looking to use it with the intention to degrade gracefully, suit other search engines the bottom line is to not use snapshots or at least in this convention. According to google ...


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You want to indicate the preferred URL with <link rel="canonical" href="https://blog.example.com/AirportTransfer/Direction/Packages" /> on all versions of the page that are the same in the <head> Google has an excellent article on this here, https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/139066?hl=en.


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This is a really good question! However, the answer can be found relatively easily with a site:stackoverflow.com "A language-independent collaboratively" search. The first thing you need to know: https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/35624?rd=1 We use a number of different sources for this information, including descriptive information in the ...


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Your best bet are title and meta description tags. These will be used in most cases, although there can be exceptions. Stack Overflow's description is most likely taken from DMOZ (http://www.dmoz.org/Reference/Ask_an_Expert/Computers_and_Technology/). Google will sometimes use the description from DMOZ instead of the provided meta description or a ...


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For some reason Google thinks your client's website is a relevant website when someone searches for bad-keyword. This works in the exact same way as trying to score good for keyword, the websites content and titles and other SEO valuable items score high in relevance. Apparently this site provides good results for this keyword, other than rewriting the ...


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The Data that are displayed in the search results are based on Structured Data and you can learn more about it from the link below. https://developers.google.com/search/docs/guides/intro-structured-data If you are having a WordPress site, you can attain many of the features you want using the Yoast SEO plugin which can be downloaded from the official ...


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Google doesn’t seem to be using Facebook and Twitter social signals when it comes to ranking. However, there are obviously still plenty of benefits and marketers shouldn’t cease those benefits simply because there doesn’t seem to be direct relation between those two social media platforms and Google ranking. Here's a link for further understanding -> ...


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I am not sure if this strategy will work but research on net and ask questions to wix support. Go for paid plan of wix which allows custom domain. Register your domain with any domain seller. Reach out to wix support that you want to have custom domain for your site. They will surely handle the 301 redirects for mysite.wix.com to www.mysite.com Move the ...


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Well, google says they can effectively crawl and index dynamic URLs. Static URLs are known to be better than dynamic URLs for a number of reasons including the following: Static URLs tend to rank better in search engines. The content found on dynamic pages is usually indexed by search engines much more slowly than that of static pages. Static URLs look ...



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