Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

This falls under Google's prohibition of doorway pages in their search index: Some examples of doorways include: ... Multiple pages on your site with similar content designed to rank for specific queries like city or state names They also say how they deal with sites that use such pages: Google may take action on doorway sites and other sites ...


2

The short version: yes, this will be harmful. Aside from grammatical errors, the repetitive nature of the content as well as the actual content itself suggests you are creating 800+ pages of marketing spam. Expect the Search Engines to react accordingly.


0

If the site doesn't exist anymore, you won't be able to host the sitemap file and share it with Google. The site and all its pages will automatically get de-indexed in some time.


0

Yes that link have nothing to see. But you can use following if you want to remove page from google search : Remove page URL from google


1

Bing absolutely does. Before I told it not to it would continually submit both a contact form and a survey form. I knew it was Bingbot because I included $_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT'] in the $_POST information. No other spider ever submitted those forms.


1

They can and do. I've got a simple email collection form on the front of a site I'm about ready to launch. I just received a submission from that form from IP 66.249.73.214, which is a GoogleBot IP.


5

It is redundant and unnecessary. /* Applies to all robots */ User-agent: * Disallow: /page/ Disallow: /ajax Disallow: *?back*


0

Andrew Loft's suggestion of a sitemap index file is perfectly acceptable. I agree with him that multiple sitemaps per site is OK and your use case for it is a good one. There are two other ways to let Google know about multiple sitemaps that work just as well: Submit all the sitemaps to Google Webmaster Tools You can submit a sitemap, no matter what it ...


3

I think a lot of people get very fixated on SEO "techniques" and what the latest algo is. Basing your decisions on the very frequent changes that Google makes is not the best way to run a site or a business. Unless, you are using black hat techniques and are trying to stay ahead of Google catching you. Focus on things you can control You will never guess ...


1

This is a good question and I'm glad to hear you're online again, but as requested i'll dig into this scenario a bit deeper. OK firstly, like many elements online you need to keep the latency of requests as low as possible, this includes dns lookups. By relaying your dns information in a long chain using many providers you will increase the points of ...


0

The menus on your main site should link to your blog, and the menus on your blog should link to your main site. It is really that simple. Since you blog is a subdomain of your main domain, it is very easy to get Google and other search engines to view it as part of your site. See: Do subdomains help/hurt SEO?


2

You have a problem whether or not you have descriptions on your search pages: Google doesn't want to index your search results in their search results. You need to block your search results pages with robots.txt or add meta robots noindex tags to your search results pages. If you continue to allow your search results to be indexed by Google, Google could ...


4

You can have multiple sitemaps per website, and this is a great example of when that makes sense. You should make sure you have a Sitemap Index listing each of your sitemaps. It will probably look something like: <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <sitemapindex xmlns="http://www.sitemaps.org/schemas/sitemap/0.9"> <sitemap> ...


4

No, you are categorically not allowed to title your business name on Google My Business (formerly Google Places and Google Local Business) with anything other than your physical registered business name even if your domain name is something different. Google's quality guidelines for local business confirm this: Your name should reflect your business’ ...


0

The problem with traffic exchanges is its always dead traffic. They are doing the same thing you are and your website is basically ignored. You'll get hits and thats about it. I would never pay for a link exchange service either, they are always scams. You'll end up getting link backs from spam and usually ends up having a negative effect on your site, not a ...


2

You may consider reading this about registering your domiain so you could host your blog on your site. Regarding search engine recognition, I suggest using OG social snippets in you header, this will allow search engines and social networking site s to recognise your site more easily. Just add these taggs before the </head> tag on your site. <meta ...


1

Ideally, you markup the visible content that you already have. ("Ideally" because it’s also possible to add hidden Schema.org data which could be added to any/each page, but search engines typically prefer visible content.) For HTML5, this means that you’d have to use Microdata and/or RDFa (see my answer about their differences).


2

The suggestion doesn’t make sense. You can’t specify meta-keywords in an HTTP header. (Only meta elements with an http-equiv instead of a name attribute can alternatively be specified with HTTP headers.) It’s also not true that you would need CGI for sending an HTTP header. This could be achieved directly within your server configuration, too (for example, ...


2

As you want to use HTML5, you should consult the only document that matters, the HTML5 specification: The HTML5 spec is http://www.w3.org/TR/2014/REC-html5-20141028/. Search for "lang", and you’ll find the section The lang and xml:lang attributes. There it defines: Its value must be a valid BCP 47 language tag, or the empty string. "BCP47" is linked ...


-2

Well in my opinion paid hosting or in other words site authority may effect the SEO process, because if someone is using a free hosting with same contents will get less traffic then one who are using paid hosting. The answer is simple you paid for the domain it's your right to get visitors more then free domains, as the site authority matters in terms of SEO ...


0

As closetnoc has stated: you are keyword stuffing. Removing keywords from your page is likely to help you look less spammy and will help you rank better. You are stuffing so many keywords into your pages that Google is likely to be filtering them as spam. Your keyword filled links seem to be a big part of the reason that Google isn't ranking the page ...


1

Setting up DNS to allow any subdomain is known as wildcard subdomains. Allowing any subdomain through this mechanism is fine for SEO as long as they redirect. My domains are all set up this way. Since you say you have a redirect in place that will take users to the canonical www subdomain, there will be no SEO problems. It would be an SEO problem to ...


1

Yes, it may affect if the sub-domains point to same content pages. All you need to do is use 301 re-direct and canonical here is the link: When to use canonical? Prepaid products of different values


1

If "fetch as Google" is able to retrieve the pages without errors, then it sounds like Googlebot just hasn't gotten around to re-crawling all the pages yet. The errors will go away within a couple weeks as Googlebot recrawls the error pages. You can use the "mark as fixed" feature in Google Webmaster Tools. It will remove the errors from your list for ...


1

The spec www.w3.org/TR/html401/struct/dirlang.html#h-8.1 says that language codes come from RFC1766 http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc1766.txt, which says: The following registrations are predefined: In the primary language tag: All 2-letter tags are interpreted according to ISO standard 639, "Code for the representation of names of ...


1

Just because you think a page is optimized for a keyword, does not mean the search engines do. There are a lot of factors that go into ranking a web page and you do not control many of them. And if your optimization efforts seem to be unnatural it may hurt your page's chances of ranking. There is no definite way to diagnose this as we do not have access ...


0

The main concern would be duplicate content. If the pages at both sites are the same and the other site could be more authoritative, then they could rank for your content. There are two reasons that it shouldn't be a big issue: They don't show product descriptions, so that is still unique to your site The buy button links back to your site. A link to ...


0

A single page application can rank well in search engines for its brand terms. If you have content embedded in this application, you'll want to implement crawlable AJAX. Doing so allows you assign #! URLs to the deep content and allow them to rank in search engines. Your existing mobile site can be redirected to the hash bang URLs of the single page ...


1

Google considers redirecting content that is no longer available to be "soft 404". They would like to be able to treat the page the same as a 404 page. If you redirect the expired page to your home page, Google will identify it as a soft 404. It will appear in Google Webmaster Tools as an error. Google won't pass the link juice from inbound links to ...


1

You may have multiple problems with this setup: Googlebot doesn't send an "accept language" header. You need to handle this case somehow. One way would be to show a page that has links to both versions. Alternately, you could redirect to the default (probably Dutch) version. Your redirects need to be 301 permanent. You may have implemented the ...


2

There is an accepted usage of anchor tags without href attributes: Named anchors such as: <a name=sectionA>Section A</a> Search engines are fine with that, so they should be fine with your a tag with no attributes as well. They won't see it as a link and they won't try to pass link juice to it.


1

This can be accomplished by using Structured Data. You can use something like the following to set the update date: <span class="entry-date updated"><?php echo get_the_date(); ?></span> This is a WordPress example but the concept is the same. You can also put the update date in your meta description. This could help with conversations ...


1

There is no arbitrary bonus for using SPDY so SPDY itself does not affect SEO. But SPDY can make your site more responsive (i.e. load faster) which is a ranking factor so it can indirectly affect your rankings. But so far Google has stated that page speed only affects the rankings of a small segment of websites )probably the slowest) and most sites won't ...


0

I find it plausible that the addition of cache headers would reduce the amount of crawling that Googlebot has to do. If you are telling Googlebot that the page can be cached for a week, then it may not come back to crawl again until that cache expires.


-2

Chrome is the answer! They develop browser for better web analysis.


1

According to https://developers.google.com/webmasters/mobile-sites/mobile-seo/configurations/separate-urls, we need to add rel=alternate to our sitemap and rel=canonical to the corresponding page on the site.


1

This is one of the reasons sitemaps exists. So search engines can find content that they may normally not be able to find through the usual means (i.e. links). So, yes, put these pages in your sitemap.


1

The ideal scenario is to keep the content so that it's still indexed, even if not useful. I'll explain: I worked on a video website that while worked with user submitted videos, sometimes we received requests to remove them. This lead to a lot of 404's being returned which wasn't good for SEO. We approached a redirect to the homepage but the number was so ...


-1

having 431 redirect is better than 410. because if there are links to your page on the web, they will be redirected to new page and give it some SEO juice. you can also keep the content(or just page) and add a no-index to it. it will be removed from search engines and you will be able to remove it after a while without worrying about search engines or ...


1

For that occasion, the answer is to use the follow / don't do nothing. If the content you're creating is a decent piece of legit, original content, you should insert your sources or link to relevant pieces using a normal link and not even thinking about it. I normally only use nofollow in situations like: Paid Links; Comments; Something not generated by ...


1

When you added CDN, did you also added site-wide SSL? If you did, your current site in WMT is HTTP and that won't be crawled anymore as you have move away from HTTP. So go ahead, add a new site in WMT as https:// in front of it and it will show you all the impressions and everything back to normal.


0

I'd say one of the most common practices hear would be adding noindex to the listing pages, apart from the first one, so as you said they will still get crawled but will not get added to the index. I think this is preferable to blocking them in robots.txt as Google is still free to crawl through the site and can still follow links on the pages. but nofollow ...


1

The way Google says to handle it makes me think they don't appreciate iframes that much. Google supports frames and iframes to the extent that it can. Frames can cause problems for search engines because they don't correspond to the conceptual model of the web. In this model, one page displays only one URL. Pages that use frames or iframes display ...


1

I generally peg the approximate value of a topical, low-Pagerank, non-spammy link at about $200 USD. I wouldn't pay more than that for the site in question. There is no clear advantage to DMOZ links compared to other topical, non-spammy links. Google no longer uses them to power the Google Directory or appears to give links from the site any special ...


2

This one is rather easy. You do not have a description meta-tag. Search engine result page (SERP) snippets generally come from the description meta-tag though another closer matching content snippet can be used instead to satisfy the searchers intent. While the site does look good, you have made some fundamental SEO mistakes. Your title tag is too ...


1

Generally this is not something to worry about. I am not sure what site is linking to you, it could be a toxic site (definition below). There are many scraper sites (performance sites that scrape Alexa data or keyword sites are the norm) out there that link to the domain root and they are not toxic. They just do not have any value. I have one that has just ...


2

I would leave everything as is and let SEO by Yoast do the work for you. You should use rel="canonical" on your subsequent pages or rel="prev" and rel="next". Or you can use both. Here is what Google recommends: In cases of paginated content, we recommend either a rel=canonical from component pages to a single-page version of the article, or to use ...


0

Just the fact that a URL is in the sitemap means that Google is likely to view it as the canonical page. In your sitemap, include only the canonical URL but not the non-canonical versions. Source: The Sitemap Paradox where Google's John Mueller discusses what Sitemaps are good for and says: Recognizing preferred URLs for canonicalization (there are ...


1

For best SEO you shouldn't paginate your articles. A page can contain about a book's worth of content before it becomes to slow to download. Images, CSS, and JavaScript typically dwarf the amount of text on the page in terms of bandwidth. Putting tons of text on a page doesn't slow your server down. Users get turned off by having to keep clicking to the ...


1

The base directory in your URLs will make no difference to Google. Google indexes pages linked from one directory to another. Google often chooses not to index URLs for other reasons: The page doesn't have enough link juice. If you have only one page that links to the page, it may not make the cut. The site and page is too new. Google often takes ...



Top 50 recent answers are included