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3

AFAIK, not really a noticable difference. I prefer relative (always from document root, but no domain). If you'd change to https, you don't need to update every internal link in my website. If you rename your site, or change from 'always www.' to 'never www.' (for whatever reason) you don't need to update everything. This pro increases when you created ...


2

What I want to do is detect the language of the browser in my PHP-script and serve the different versions based on that (there will probably be a button to switch the language as well). However, with that approach, both versions of the same page would share one URL (e.g. example.com/about would show either versions of the page, depending on the user's ...


2

Yes, that is the purpose of the alt tag on images: to provide alternate text if the image can't be read, in this case by a search engine. You can see this in action by looking at the text-only view of the Google cache of the page: the sentence looks normal and integrates the content of the alt attribute.


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I think you have misunderstood the WMT sitemap submission tool. Once you submit the location of your sitemap, you don't need to resubmit it again unless you are changing the location/name of the sitemap file. You just update the sitemap at the location and it will be processed on regular intervals by google. You can also see the last processed date on ...


1

Absoloute URL's are inflexible as they don't adapt to their context. Though if they're generated on the fly from a system then that's not a big problem. Relative URL's come in different forms and there are some benefits. Page relative URL's (e.g. ../../about.html) Domain relative URL's (e.g. /about.html) Protocol relative URL's (e.g. ...


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The simple answer is that no, you can't really get a URL that is redirected somewhere else to show up in a Google search result. I'm assuming here that the alias is setup to redirect with a 301 status response code to your full website URL. But, in your case, that is probably a really good thing. There are a couple big reasons for that: 1) Chances are good ...


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If you have access to the source then you could consider using SVG, that way Google can read the text. – from Simon Hayter in comments If you just want the text indexed for search engines and don't care about accessibility, then you can add a caption to the image in the sitemap: <image:image> ...


1

This one is simple. Your title tag is too long! This is a common mistake that I detail in these answers: Title in Google does not match <title> of document Title tag different from title appearing in Google? There is a limit of 512 pixels at least for Google. I cannot speak for Bing. Any wider character such as W, G, D, or X will take up additional ...


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I found that using Google+ Pages to manage business listings caused this to happen for a client as well. Switching them over to Google My Business Locations fixed the problem. Also, verifying the locations with Google helps a great deal, either via phone or post.



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