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13

Wget is just a command line tool for linux that fetches resources over HTTP - all this tells you is that someone accessed your site via a command line, it could have been a bot scraping you, but there's no way of knowing for sure If your site is password protected properly, there shouldn't be any need to block particular user agents :) x


12

Between two options, there is no difference for SEO. By the way, your question is not about SEO but it's about HTML semantic. To respect the HTML semantic and unlike you think, the <p> tag exists for displaying paragraphs of text, not text. But in general, texts are displayed in a page through paragraphs. That's why you can use <p> tag inside a ...


8

Google doesn't care about the length of your articles. It cares about whether your page satisfies the searchers that it sends to your site. With that in mind, the length of your articles should be: Long enough to inform the user. Short enough that most users read the whole thing. There is no "minimum length" for web pages to be indexed. Web pages ...


6

This is normal behavior. I am not sure what your question is exactly. But here goes. I am going to assume you are using Apache and host your DNS. Create the sub-domain on your server however you need. For Apache, this would be almost exactly like any other domains website. You can find the configuration files in /etc/apache2/sites-available or ...


5

wget has legitimate uses, yes, but it's also quite useful for Web scraping. However, I don't think you should try to block it (or any other agent) by using the user agent string. wget respects, by default, your robots.txt file. It's true that a scraper can just switch that option off, but guess what -- it's just as easy to use --user-agent ...


4

The only consideration I see is that the words download, PDF, and article will become likely the top three or at least within the top ten keywords your site is known for therefore the site topic as seen by Google and/or Bing maybe that of article download. There may be two problems with that: Your site is not about article downloading. It can dilute the ...


4

If your repeated content is used to help your users and doesn't content keywords of your website, I don't think it would be considered as keyword stuffing by search engines. However, if you want to avoid potential duplicate content issues, you can avoid repeating this paragraph over your all pages and migrate it to a new page like an "help center to ...


4

I would think neither would make a difference except for preference. Search engines are looking at word boundries (programming term) when parsing a string and would not recognize these characters as either a word nor a part of an HTML tag and likely will ignore them completely. From an SEO perspective, they would likely be totally ignored.


4

Sometimes people may post comments with a lot of dangerous keywords like casinos, poker, gambling, viagra and linked with low quality sites. Also sometimes people are using keywords instead of their original name to get the link for their target keywords. As a result your site or blog with low quality or unnatural links. So it will affect your rankings ...


3

I think that you may be interested in this article: Design AJAX-powered sites for accessibility. It's a very basic article, but it should give you some pointers about what to do and what not to do. AJAX should be used to improve the experience on specific pages and elements of the site, but not to build a whole site. For the user perspective, it's a bad ...


3

Blogs seem to be all the rage. But do they always fit the situation? I would answer that by testing a blog internal within the company to first test if there are enough topics that could be covered as to create new and interesting content consistently and for a prolonged period, and two whether you can plan the keyword usage effectively enough to create an ...


3

In general, spam is not a good point for SEO but it depends on what spam exactly is on your blog: 1. Useless text showing the user didn't read your article If spam only represents a text including something like "Thanks for your perfect article!", I don't think it affects SEO of your page. And even if it doesn't provide a relevant comment for your visitors ...


3

Besides what others have mentioned, sometimes spammers post links to websites that contain viral exploits of certain browsers and operating systems. If your site is frequently referring other computers to compromised / dangerous websites you can be considered part of the threat. Your links would also be increasing the PageRank (term used loosely) of the ...


3

The reason to use the rel=canonical shouldn't be the term users use to get to the site, but the content. If each page has different content and/or different reason to exist, like index and content, then there is no need for canonical, even more, it's use would be incorrect, semantically speaking. What you should do, for instance, is improve the product ...


3

I'd start out by first checking if they have a "canonical" tag on their site pointing to yours; if they do, despite content duplication, Google will still rank yours as the first (and omit their duplication from index). It might still be infringement, but with drastically reduced damage. Second, if your content dates >6 months ago, there is a very good ...


3

Unfortunately, you most probably won't be capable of measuring the SEO performance of the page before and after on-page optimization. The reason is you can't freeze the search engines for a period of time for your keywords. Search engines continue to calculate positions during the time where robots (web crawlers) index your page page for the first time and ...


3

I assume you're referring to http://www.andreexpress.be/diensten/ramenwasser/. Was the page's <title> tag ever "ramen en vitrines"? If you changed the title after Google indexed the page, Google is probably using a cached version of the page. Give them time to re-index the page and the title will be updated accordingly.


2

If you know before time when this page (job advert) will expire then consider including an unavailable_after META tag (or X-Robots-Tag HTTP response header) to inform search engines (ie. Google) before time: <meta name="googlebot" content="unavailable_after: 2014-Mar-30 18:00:00 GMT"> Reference: Robots Exclusion Protocol: now with even more ...


2

Your biggest issue here are the 80 words: how relevant are they? I highly doubt you'll get a conclusive answer on a ratio, so I'm just gonna share my experience. If you think about headers, menus, footers and all of that, most websites are pretty repetitive. I have been very successful in one website for example, where the only different content in many ...


2

Considering the fact that the reach of Facebook pages gets weaker each day I would go with a blog on a domain that I can control - you can always share articles on social media. Facebook is good for communicating with customers, but I would not use it as a blog as I would loose control over my content. Creating a company blog is a matter of 2 hours of work ...


2

Simple answer. You can't. Alexa gets it's information from just two primary sources; the toolbar, and the web bug. The Alexa web bug is for those sites that opt-in to Alexa metrics, while the toolbar is for those individuals that opt-in to having their browsing habits being tracked within the browser. Alexa's website metrics is not a popular option as ...


2

Every classified ad could be an Offer. The seller property can refer to the Organization/Person offering something. The itemOffered property can refer to the actual Product (e.g., a car) that gets offered. etc.


2

Use rel=canonical when you have pages with small variations. I have an eshop for rubber stamps and each stamp can have a different color. Selecting a different color changes the anchor link, which means that it is a slightly different url. I would use rel=canonical in this instance - I really have a single page that has major value to the visitor, the ...


2

...the product pages doesn't seem to rank in search engines. Setting a rel="canonical" is unlikely to help your ranking if you aren't currently being ranked already. Setting a rel="canonical" tag informs search engines which of the two (essentially duplicate) pages should appear in search engine results (SERPs). If you don't specify this then the ...


2

The fact that these pages may be competing against each other is worrying. rel="canonical" will help you towards that. If you have 3 pages alike for example, and use this in 2 of them, only one will rank. There's many different ways to go about product variations. In my opinion, it would be better to list these 3 products all within one page, for example: ...


2

In most cases, the homepage has more SEO weight because it gets more backlinks to it than other pages. If you want to see showing up on Google Search each page of your site for specific keywords, you can try: to optimize each page for these specific keywords (<title>, <h1>, etc.) to get more backlinks to these internal pages


2

First, I would take all those <p> is more relevant for SEO than <div> with a big grain of salt. SEO really only cares about content relevancy. Putting text in a <div> or in a <p> is not something you should be tweaking. Just go to what is the natural use. <div> pretty much means 'this is a section of content' while <p> is ...


2

Even if you have redirects and/or canonical tags set up to your preferred domain, you should still set your preferred domain in Google Webmaster Tools (GWT for short) To do this click the gear icon in the top right of GWT, and click 'site settings', then tick your preferred domain. Most of the time this option will be greyed out (not selectable) and there ...


2

The "U" in URL stands for "Unique" (some say Uniform) which should be a good clue here :) Best case scenario is that you split any "link popularity" between 2 different URLs. Imagine half the visitors to the page using one URL and half using the other URL. Each URL only gets 50% of the traffic, 50% of any popularity "score" that Google might apply. To that ...



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