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5

Page speed is a ranking factor to some degree, as mentioned by Matt Cutts in this related video (Aug 2013): Is page speed a more important factor for mobile sites?. However, pages are also ranked on their own merits. So that one page may not (should not) bring down the ranking of the other (fast) pages on your site (if that is what you are implying). But ...


4

From an SEO standpoint, moving from a keyword domain to a company branded domain is a good move. The 2014 SearchMetrics Ranking Factors found that that having keywords in the domain name is no longer a significant ranking factor. I consider hyphens in domain names to be bad for rankings as well. Moving to company branded domain name is a good move for ...


4

Yes. Whatever the web root for the subdomain is where you would put a robots.txt for that subdomain's contents. It will not affect the root domain and the root domain's robots.txt will not affect the subdomain.


3

Your current meta description is too long to fit into Google's search results pages. If this happens, instead of truncating the current description, Google often pull content from elsewhere on the page to create a description. This often results in unhelpful, incomplete or widely inaccurate description such as yours. The first thing you should do is ...


3

From SEO perspective it does not matter which one you use. Either approach will not effect you SEO directly. It might effect your CTR because the URLs look messy. When it comes to SEO, the issue here is not really about which way to output the URL's (like your way better) but what to do with the generated pages. You have two options: 1. If you want your ...


3

Repeating a link will not cause extra PageRank to be passed to that page, nor will it cause link juice to get lost. Google usually only pays attention to the anchor text from the first link. If one of the links has a rel nofollow on it, then Google treats all the duplicate links as if they were nofollowed. (Why should they trust any if you say they can't ...


2

You are correct, you use the 301 header for this. The amount of pages that end up redirected doesn't matter. If you have more than one identical pages, redirect-301 them all to one. An .htaccess file would be something along these lines: RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} ^/page/.* RewriteRule ^page/(.*) /page-$1 [L,R=301] The reason everybody says you have to ...


2

You can't mix a single website using different TLDs, they will always be separate sites as on different domains. So what would be happening is that you have three separate websites. The SEO issues I see here are that there could be duplication of content between the three sites, so this could affect both sites adversely in search engines rankings of the ...


2

Don't show content only to search engines and not to users. This is called cloaking is a violation of the search engines terms of service. If this content is never going to be seen by users then you should remove it from the HTML completely.


2

Hidden content is fine as long as you have a way of accessing that information... To extend on Johns answer you can hide content from both users and search engines if the content can be viewed by a action. What this means is any content that is hidden must have a way of being viewed by both users and search engines. Ideal CSS Method This can be done in ...


2

The amount of time that users spend on your site after clicking on a webinar link that has been sent to them via email will in no way change your Google rankings. Here is a video by Google's Matt Cutts where he addresses whether or not Google uses Google Analytics data as a ranking factor. The answer is "no". Google does care about the experience its ...


2

If Google isn't indexing words contained within scripts, then the words need to be added to the HTML where Googlebot does pick up on them. So that all the data isn't duplicated, it can be removed from the script. The JavaScript can pull the text out of the HTML document and use it. The text in the page can be hidden via CSS. This should not be ...


2

Yes. This is a very common thing and is highly recommended for three simple reasons; it can effect your listing in the search engine results page (SERP), it can effect local searches, and it is a trust metric/factor for your site. You can find some examples here: https://developers.google.com/webmasters/business-location-pages/schema.org-examples Here is ...


2

Some things you can do: a. 301 redirect all URLs, so that .ac.uk/anything goes to .co.uk/anything (yes, including /sitemap.xml, /robots.txt, etc. The one exception could be your Google Webmaster verification file, but it's probably easier to handle verification through DNS in this case). b. Use Google Webmaster Change of Address tool c. Try to change as ...


2

Google does not treat CSS content the same as that on page Generally Google will only attempt to index content that is actually embedded within the page content associated with an appropriate tag such as <img>. You can however attempt to force Google's hand by adding the path of the background image into a image sitemap. Some Schema markups require ...


2

From my experience, linking from within the same industry does not provide value. In some cases can incur a penalty. I once worked on a project where, we'll say plumbers, started linking to other plumbers not in their area, for SEO purposes. This ended up getting all of the plumbers banned from the index. This ban took 2 years to fix, and required some ...


2

The only case in which I know that Google prefers some top level domains over others is in the case of geotagetable country domains. Google has a list of generic top level domains. As long as the top level domain is on this list, Google will show the site globally in search results. For country code domains not on the list (eg .de, .it, .br), it will ...


2

Google places sites into the Google sites with various TLDs according to interest/performance and language. For example, there is not much need for Chinese language .cn sites in Google.com mostly because of the language. For this reason, many companies in China have begun registering and moving their sites to .com TLDs with English language sites to expand ...


1

There is no set ratio. It is good practice to have an internal link structure with keyword rich anchor text to emphasize the important pages, but having too many internal links can be confusing and give a poor user experience. A more beneficial approach would be to have external links pointing to your sites deep inner pages, which will increase Page ...


1

John is right. In fact, these tools can often confuse people. Some of the metrics seem to be gee-whiz more than anything of value. Any online site like Open Site Explorer seriously lags behind and while this one is one of the very best, the reality is that the entire pool of online sites of this type are poor. The plain truth is, no one knows your link ...


1

Use the noindex meta tag <meta name="robots" content="noindex"> on all pages except the Homepage. This will ensure all pages (other than the homepage) are removed from major search engines.


1

Using a robots.txt file will not cause a pages to be de-indexed. It will just prevent search engines from crawling them. They can still be listed in the search results, though. To have pages removed from the index you need to use the x-robots-tag HTTP header: x-robots-tag: noindex


1

Try putting the following robots.txt in the root of your website: User-agent: * Disallow: / Allow: /$ Note that it will take time and that you can use Webmaster Tools to manually request their removal (this can speed up the process).


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Oh absolutely not! Creating web 2.0 links are limited in value these days with the preference being squarely in the corner of organic links. If you are making web 2.0 links, then they should be more organic in appearance. Link tactics these days revolve around conversational links within content if possible. It is okay to create a "by line" link and any ...


1

To clarify the terminology: Microdata is a syntax. Schema.org is a vocabulary. (And such a vocabulary can be used with different syntaxes like JSON-LD, Microdata, and RDFa). Your two example snippets are correct. And your observation is also correct: BlogPosting doesn’t define any new properties. […] can I use the properties from other item types like: ...


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If you are providing information in <h1>, <h2> and <h3> to specify what your content is all about, then you are not practicing keyword stuffing. Search engines appreciate this information and it helps them index your content properly. If you are intentionally adding keywords in your content, knowing that there are already enough to ...


1

Webmasters use CSS to design their websites without using HTML and they are also using techniques to hide the content from web crawlers. But, you need to know that Search engines do not want to be fooled by designers and that is why they have started indexing CSS files. When crawlers finds something messy and stuffed, they may penalize it. The only ...


1

Google doesn't index text that is contained in CSS. Google only cares about text that it indexes that users then can't find when they land on your site. You should be fine. To be doubly sure that it won't cause problems, use symbols like = = = = = = = = = = = =... to fill up the div. Even if Google does end up indexing CSS after text at some point, they ...


1

I don't think there is necessarily a right or wrong answer here, but thinking about it logically, if i'm looking for a restaurant, I would most likely be looking for one within a certain local area. So with that in mind, I'd say www.example.com/new-york/restaurants/abc-restaurant would be the most logical and user friendly approach. You might want to ...


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This is one way people canonicalise duplicate product pages on ecommerce and is a valid way to use it. As long as the content on the product page is identical, or a large part of the content is exact and appears on both pages. If the pages are not extremely close in exact words, the canonical designation might be disregarded by search engines. For the most ...



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