Hot answers tagged

10

I would say it wouldn't harm much, nor will it add anything. I prefer to keep my header tags clean and wouldn't add the i. The inline styling would be a bigger problem, which isn't really an big issue. Instead of doing this, you can add the gear icon to the H2 directly: h2.Geared:before{ display: inline-block; color: rgb(102, 149, 45); ...


6

Since 2014, Google has been giving websites available over HTTPS a slightly higher search engine ranking score. Given that your blog is only available over HTTP, it may appear lower in the results for some searches. However, Google isn't penalizing web site owners if other parts of their web sites aren't available over HTTPS but the main site is, at least as ...


4

It'll be better long term to update your page content slowly as you will be rewarded for constant page refreshs which contributes to domain authorithy. To answer a few of your other questions: Search Engines don't care negatively when changing the design of a website. Search Engines don't care for meta keywords, they are obsolete for major search ...


4

Yes, the context of the word affects how strongly people react against its usage. We can truly understand the context, but search engines cannot fully understand. Google and other search engines have sets of filters to prevent profanity. One example of how they do this is Google's "SafeSearch" filter. Granted, this is disabled by default and is intended for ...


4

SEO and the impact that any work has is not about length. Sure bloggers have echoed that blog posts should only be about 300-350 words, then 500, and so on. At one point, search engines rewarded blog posts as being timely and these posts were easily found by it's length. Then it was discovered that the bounce rate of blog posts was significant. The reason ...


4

The domain authority on expired domains comes mostly from the inbound links to their deep pages. If you have similar enough content that your domain can satisfy the users that click on those links then you might get some SEO benefit from the domain redirect. To get it, you would have to put appropriate redirects in place. For example if you find a link ...


4

It is against Google's webmaster guidelines to put machine translated text where Googlebot can find it and index it. Google will penalize your site for auto-generated content for doing so. Here is the excerpt from the guidelines: Q: Can I use automated translations? A: Yes, but they must be blocked from indexing with the “noindex” robots meta ...


3

This is not an answer, but a caveat for XML sitemap wizard users. I recently did a tech & SEO overview of a site rebuild where an XML sitemap was auto-generated by a wizard. She failed to review it and see that all the URL's were like **new.**site.com/page.asp - the dev server where the site was built! Typing out a txt sitemap has the advantage of ...


3

Despite what so many SEOs tell you, search is not about keywords. Search engines do not match keywords directly and have not for a very long time. It is all about semantics (linguistics). You have several issues. 1] Not enough content to attract search users. The more content you have, the more potential you will have to attract users. Think about it, the ...


3

If http://example.com/filter shows the list with all movies, and http://example.com/filter?=rate shows the list with all these entries sorted differently, then it’s appropriate to use the canonical link type. So on http://example.com/filter?=rate you could add: <link rel="canonical" href="http://example.com/filter" /> However, if you want the list ...


3

Any migration carries some degree of risk and short-term consequences; a move to HTTPS is no exception. Rand Fishkin wrote an interesting post on Moz's experience moving to HTTPS. The short version of that story is that they initially lost about 11% of their organic search traffic, but recovered within 3 months. So yes, there can be at least some short-term ...


3

I can't tell much about Baidu's ranking algorithms. But I've been living in China for quite some time already. During all these years, I did not see much of .中国 domains in use. Neither did I see them within the first ranks of Baidu on either search conducted so far. I'd suggest going for .cn, if your content is about to be in simplified Chinese, and .com if ...


3

Hate to disagree with the accepted answer, but why not use the offer schema type so you are not messing with CSS for data? <div itemprop="offers" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Offer"> <meta itemprop="price" content="229.95" /> <meta itemprop="priceCurrency" content="USD" /> </div> <div itemprop="offers" itemscope ...


3

You don't have anything to worry about. Migrations incur risk when: You're changing the domain name You're changing the protocol (i.e. HTTP to HTTPS) You're changing the URLs of any pages, as you'd then need to put some 301 redirects in place. As none of these seem to apply to you, all that's really changing is your site's IP address. That can only ...


3

It's called adaptive web development. You need to detect the user-agent and serve different markup based on the device. In PHP, you can use $_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT']. You'll want to include this code in order to let Google know what you're up to: <?php Header('Vary: User-Agent'); ?> Here's some more info: ...


3

No, these would be considered natural editorial links and thus its perfectly reasonable to pass 'link equity' to these sites. Some sites do apply nofollow to all links, but personally i dont think this is a good idea, as it may inhibit companies from working with you on editorial pieces. The reason nofollow is applied to paid / sponsored content, is a ...


3

I want to create a website that will grab content from other news websites using their RSS and insert it in my database. I am only going to show the title and an excerpt with a link to the original post. Is this a good idea? No, because you're using someone else's content Will Google ban my website? If you keep it up, then Google will ...


3

If you really want to prevent a link from being indexed or followed, you can go extreme as follows: If you're using a server-side scripting language or have sufficient apache access, then modify code so that the page to not be indexed will have an HTTP 410 status code attached to it, meaning the page is gone for good. This will effectively cause previous ...


3

No search engine cares one whit about your class names and such things are given no SEO consideration in any way, shape or form. They serve no purpose as far as content goes. They mean nothing to the end user.


3

Google pays almost no attention to which tags you use these days. Google cares about how the page looks to users. It cares about which text is big. It cares about which text is prominent. It cares about which text is hidden. Recent SEO tests have shown that there is no difference between using a <div> tag that is styled to look like a heading ...


3

This is a great idea, when handled properly. You need to to some research about domains first Verify that there is not Manual Penalty to this domain (Verify it through Google Webmaster Tool ) Check the back-links of domain if any. It might be victim of Penguin 2 & 2.1 (You can use ahref.com for example) Redirecting domains without above ...


3

You need to use 301 each of the http pages to the https ones. A 301 redirect is a permanent redirect which passes between 90-99% of link juice (ranking power) to the redirected page.


2

Are both sets of text content (in an HTML document) equally visible to search engines Absolutely yes: both variants are fully equal. All search engines understand unicode (your second example), the encoded HTML entities from the first example are not a problem too. The entity encoding is nothing other as another encoding like, win-8859-1, utf-8 or ...


2

In addition, Minifying a resource, be it a CSS, JavaScript, or HTML file—is simply the process of removing spaces, comments, tabs, and other unnecessary code in the file. There are many tools available for minification. Use Google’s Closure Compiler for JavaScript, YUI Compressor for CSS, and an HTML minifier for HTML. Again, it’s easiest to simply ...


2

The problem is not with Google. Your site is not redirecting properly: $ curl --head http://www.example.com/ HTTP/1.1 301 Moved Permanently Date: Mon, 18 Jan 2016 13:09:29 GMT Server: Apache/2.4.7 (Ubuntu) Location: https://www.www.example.com/ Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1 You are issuing an https redirect with www.www in it when http is ...


2

I'm gonna clear the confusion. You have an old site you want to spruce up and get indexed and then you want to host it at a new address. Your best bet is to simply issue permanent redirects from the old page to the new one. This can be done many ways. If your old server runs on apache with mod_rewrite installed, you can use .htaccess with the following ...


2

absolutely yes. Site with little or no original content is for Google like an affiliate website, which promotes a third part product with third part content and cuts cookie. https://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.de/2008/09/demystifying-duplicate-content-penalty.html https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/76465


2

To link to your AMP version use: <link rel="amphtml" href="/{/path/to/amp.html}"> For the backlink from AMP version to the desktop version use: <link rel="canonical" href="http://example.com">


2

The more unique the tags are from page to page, the better. Making it unique only by changing a digit might not be good enough. If you can't make the tags more unique than just digits, you can consider using the word version of each number. For example, instead of: <h1>Something - Page 1</h1> <h1>Something - Page 2</h1> ...


2

This answer comes from memory. If I'm 100% correct with the syntax, you'll want to replaced your 4 commented out lines of code with: RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !^/en(.*)$ RewriteCond %{HTTP:Accept-Language} ^en [NC] RewriteRule ^$ https://www.example.com/en/ [L,R=301] RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !^/it(.*)$ RewriteCond %{HTTP:Accept-Language} ^it [NC] ...



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