Hot answers tagged

8

Looks like it. This example comes from the HTML5 specs: For example, the following link is a French translation that uses the PDF format: <link rel=alternate type=application/pdf hreflang=fr href=manual-fr>


7

First off, please stop thinking in terms of keywords. I assure you that Google does not match keywords. The process is far more sophisticated than simply seeing if a term exists. In fact, term matches are not done. Semantic topic matches are however. So stop thinking in terms of keywords. It is a waste. Think topic. The URL can be divided into 4 basic ...


7

Google cares only about content (unique, correct headerts etc. ) and incoming links (from good sites with similar content) . Nothing more, nothing less :D


5

This is a really good question! However, the answer can be found relatively easily with a site:stackoverflow.com "A language-independent collaboratively" search. The first thing you need to know: https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/35624?rd=1 We use a number of different sources for this information, including descriptive information in the ...


5

Obviously you can always have nested categories in WordPress (and most other CMSs) as well as child pages, child posts, grandchildren, etc. If done in a non-spammy fashion, there is no real advantage or disadvantage from the pure SEO perspective...the spiders don't particularly care so long as the links work and the content is indexable. The big worry is ...


5

This is a good question, but the answer is no - it will not affect your search engine rankings negatively. It will provide a (marginal) benefit due to decreased file size. To understand why it won't negatively affect you, open your site up, right click anywhere, and select "Inspect element" (this option will be called something slightly different between ...


5

You want to indicate the preferred URL with <link rel="canonical" href="https://blog.example.com/AirportTransfer/Direction/Packages" /> on all versions of the page that are the same in the <head> Google has an excellent article on this here, https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/139066?hl=en.


5

You can set the canonical link on your article to be your website, so that any SEO benefits will be redirected there. The only caveat it seems, is that you need to use Medium's import tools. Here is a page from Medium talking about it. https://help.medium.com/hc/en-us/articles/217991468-Duplicate-Content-and-SEO


4

Looks like it. It even looks like Google recommends using pushShate and prefers it over hash bangs.


3

While exposed index files isn't a URL-friendly approach, your idea of redirecting to a specific index file based on what the client's device is actually a fabulous start because then search engines (especially google) can understand that you have a desktop and mobile version of your page and google will try to display the most relevant page to the client ...


3

From the Google Webmaster Guidelines: https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/66356?hl=en Buying or selling links that pass PageRank. This includes exchanging money for links, or posts that contain links; exchanging goods or services for links; or sending someone a “free” product in exchange for them writing about it and including a link ...


3

All outbound links rel=nofollow? This is common question that arouses in mind of those who avail SEO marketing services There can be only one reason to do so and that is you are linking to all spammy sites on which you do not trust. So this may give a hint to Google that you are doing spam. Which i think will not be good for your SEO. So use rel=nofollow ...


3

Google will see this buisnessdetails.php?id=12345 two ways; one is as a single page with a parameter, the second is as separate pages since the results are full, complete, and hopefully unique HTML content. Keep in mind that Google keys its index off of two primary keys; the domain name and the full and complete URL. Each complete URL that returns a ...


3

Looks like this was because of Google experimenting something. Today when searching with the same keyword Google displays the description as expected, everything shown from beginning and trimming last few words. We did not changed anything during this entire time on the website so it was definitely from Google's end. Thank you for your help.


3

When Google fetches any page, the first thing it does is store the code. The reason for this is simple. Google needs to process your web page in different ways at different times and it is far better to reference your page from it's index than to fetch it each and every time. This is where the cache comes from. If you see that the cache does not look as ...


3

Google will still crawl the page, but if there is information about your page on dmoz, Google wont display that information on it's search result page. One source Google uses to generate snippets is the Open Directory Project. You can direct us not to use this as a source by adding a meta tag to your pages. To prevent all search engines (that ...


3

It is recommended to keep a sitemap.xml up-to-date and free of errors*. If you merge the content of www.example.com/one-yellow.html and www.example.com/one-yellow-means.html into www.example.com/one.html you probably (ideally) redirect them both to www.example.com/one.html. Other URLs that have been removed may serve an HTTP status 404 (not foud) or ...


3

This is a good and specific question! I have answered this questions in parts all over the place, however, this question is specific enough to warrant it's own answer which will be very direct and helpful to others. First things first. Search is NOT about keywords. Google does not make direct term matches. Not even close. So please stop thinking in terms ...


3

A sitemap is so that Google can index your pages without having to scrape and investigate every internal link. If you want something indexed, it should be in there. If you don't want it indexed - robots.txt it. It doesn't matter if you use multiple sitemaps or a single large file. There's no limits, advantages, disadvantages outside of management.


3

Google will penalize pages with an excessive number of ads but you can have up to three ad blocks with no penalty (based on AdSense policy). As for page load it does effect pagerank but not a ridiculously huge amount compared to how content affects it.


3

Yes and no. It is content that ranks and image tags offer some to the total performance of the page, however, it is limited. Where your friend is right is engagement. Google looks for elements that offer engagement. An image is the most basic engagement there is. At one point, Google was not shy about saying that an image should exist at the top of the ...


3

There are a few things you should know. 1] Most websites are poorly optimized. 2] Most sites with SEO help are still poorly optimized. 3] Terms found in a URL domain name are significant. 4] Terms found within content can easily overcome the lack of the same terms within the URL domain name. 5] Keywords, in of themselves, is not how search works. 6] ...


2

Closetnoc pretty much sums this up in comments... no benefit. To answer your specific questions: I understand this should not affect search engine ranking at all Correct. However, if mynewbrand.com was already an established domain/website that was already attracting significant traffic then you could benefit (if the subject matter of the original ...


2

Simple anwser is : Install some redirect plugin that use header 301 (for example https://wordpress.org/plugins/redirection/) and simply redirect non-existed links (get a list form google search console) to existing content. This will reduce 404 errors ,and you will not lose movement on site


2

Your best bet are title and meta description tags. These will be used in most cases, although there can be exceptions. Stack Overflow's description is most likely taken from DMOZ (http://www.dmoz.org/Reference/Ask_an_Expert/Computers_and_Technology/). Google will sometimes use the description from DMOZ instead of the provided meta description or a ...


2

If you can safely remove the links then remove them, if not you can add the nofollow tag to them and Google won't take them into account.


2

Is it normal for search engines that every page-title of website pages start and end with same word with only un-matching middle word? Normal? No. Somewhat common, yes...for sites that are attempting to game the search engines. This is not a recommended action for most sites. Also all website pages URLs can start with the same word? I wouldn't ...


2

You can't. meta descriptions are descriptions of the page, not the site as a whole. So you have to write some general description to cover everything. However, your content is more important.


2

I'd recommend allowing only one of the archive ("overview") types to be indexed. They're all facet views of the same body of information, so a degree of duplication will occur and, inevitably, some will be more meaningful and useful as a user entry-point than others. I'd suggest allowing categories to be indexed, and noindex the tag, date, and author ...


2

I am not sure if your theory is good because it is based on a very big assumption that your new website will take the credit for your old site after deindexing. Except rel="canonical", you don't have anything else to pass on the credit and if that isn't working now, how can you be sure it will work after deindexing your old pages? Understand that ...



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