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9

If I were you, I would launch the site with some articles and news (for example, two of each) and I would publish some new articles and news every days for a moment to launch the site and quickly attract visitors. Once the site is launched, you could publish some articles and news a little bit less regularly (once a week for example) to continue to attract ...


8

It takes weeks for Google and other search engines to de-index pages and even longer for a website, which would in time would hurt your rankings. The only thing you need to do is return a status 503 rather than a 301 to 404. This is the definition of the 503 status code from the RFC that defines these status codes: The server is currently unable to ...


4

To begin, none of your examples have anything to do with semantics. Your question is based completely on the parser model where the page is read top-to-bottom in the traditional way. For this reason, your first example is correct. The following examples will fail to give you predictable results and can cause you serious heart-burn. Please understand that ...


4

You're better off creating a multilingual sitemap, just to avoid any source of confusion. The format you have shown is correct. In fact, you could even drop the hreflang declarations in your page sections and just use the declaration within the sitemap. The Official Webmaster Tools blog explains the advantages of using the multilingual sitemaps ...


4

This is just an ad. Google apparently does not check to see if you already have a Google Webmasters Tools account before displaying the ad. I see this all the time for my site. Nothing to worry about.


4

Splash screens are acceptable according to Google. They do offer some best practices however, when using multi-language/multi-regional sites. In this article, Google recommends the use of the hreflang tag within <link rel="alternate" ... /> tag in the head. The specific excerpt from the article is below: For language/country selectors or ...


3

Google published this today which answers this question well and in detail. With the coming of many new generic top level domains (gTLDs), we'd like to give some insight into how these are handled in Google's search. We’ve heard and seen questions and misconceptions about the way we treat new top level domains (TLDs), like .guru, .how, or any of ...


3

From the very beginning, Google primarily utilized three perspectives when using semantics and ranking: one, link text and value to the target page; two, the title tag of the target page; and three, the content itself. One of the interesting research results the project found was that performing a search against the title tag was about 2% more effective than ...


3

The problem with this setup is that two requests are made to the server. One to load the initial HTML and one to load the actual data through AJAX. This alone can be enough to create a negative impact on SEO especially if all of the required content to be presented on the screen requires AJAX. Also you mentioned your site takes a few seconds to load. This ...


3

Simple answer. Terrible. Besides the fact that there will be duplicate content that will not appear in the SERPs, purchasing additional domains does not solve problems, it creates them. It is always far better to build and focus on one domain than to divide your efforts. As well, any domain with just a few pages can never rank. Especially a new domain. Any ...


3

There are no SEO benefits to serving a compressed XML sitemap over serving one that is not compressed. The advantage of compression is simply to save bandwidth and the time it takes to download. (If your sitemap is huge.) Note that the limits for the size of the sitemap are the uncompressed size (ie. 50MB uncompressed for Google).


2

Much of what you will hear about SEO is parroted non-sense. I have heard advice concerning brand postal addresses parroted around quite a bit. I will try and make sense of it for you. Please forgive me if I cover things you already know. Today happens to be one of those days with a lot of interruptions so I may have missed something. Still, I think I got the ...


2

Adding the company to Google Business You can add the business to Google Business which provides the data to Google Plus, Google Search and Google Maps. You will need to provide the actual address for verification purposes and you can disable the address being shown by clicking the checkbox I deliver goods and services to my customers at their location and ...


2

Google and other search engines generally value content where they are embedded and not where they are physically hosted. It's common for companies and bloggers to use content delivery networks without using their domain name i.e Amazon.com, Rackspace.co.uk and so forth. Unless you care about branding which in your examples you do not you shouldn't need to ...


2

What happens if your configuration will be detected by a search engine: Mixing canonical links and noindex will mostly lead to search engines ignoring your canonicals. This may lead to duplicate content issues if you also have canonicalized dynamic URLs or alike. Without the canonicals being respected properly the search engines will decide which url is ...


2

There is so many parameters Google uses to rank websites that it's impossible to tell you at the moment what to do next. Things like website speed (time taken to load the pages), server location, whether your site is served using HTTP or HTTPS, all aparently make a difference. The rankings change regularly too, as Google says it looks for "fresh" content. ...


2

Definitely post some content on the website before the launch. If you post news and blogs don't forget to use tags. A great way to start of is to describe a bit of your site, what it is about and what kind of content will it provide. Crawlers collect data from all around the webpage because of that you might wanna to take a look at SEO( Search engine ...


2

The idea is usually to track such clicks and remove the SEO benefit. Most such links will not be counted by Google and will not have a direct SEO benefit for your site. Even if Google does process the JS redirect script and discovers your linked page via such a redirect, it wouldn't give it the benefit of being counted as a regular plain-text editorial link ...


2

Click-through has always been in huge debate and no one actually knows for sure how much influence it holds, because its one of thousands of Google's secrets. But what I can tell you is that Google will know its you doing the clicking therefore you are not as a treated as unique visitor. They know its you through cookies and your ip address.


2

If you try to show content to Google and not users, you'll be trouble because that's cloaking. Search engines are actually crawling your content for it's users so if these end users can't see the content then whats the point. May be you could provide some sample of you book, which can also be crawlable.


2

Your question has to dimension to take into consideration. handling multiple languages handling duplicates Handling multiple languages Organizing language versions in subdirectories is a good strategy. For me it is best practise. If you are able to identify which language/country your user is looking for redirect him to the right directory. If not - ...


2

Yes, although I'm not sure how to measure the negatives. Essentially you will lose out on SEO by not having the pictures on your site; image searches do drive traffic, although the amount can be very minimal. If you host the images, you also have control over their naming conventions, which you can utilize for them to perform well in image searches. ...


2

You have done your research and seem to have a good handle on the situation. To sum up: Using robots.txt would prevent search engines from crawling the PDF files. If third party sites linked directly to the PDF files, then search engines might include the URLs in the search index (but would still not be able to index their contents.) Using X-Robots-Tag ...


2

Duplicate content is no longer determined in a linear fashion. Today, duplicate content is determined using a semantic scoring method so that near duplicate content will still be seen as duplicate. This is because spammers would simply rearrange the content to avoid content as being flagged as duplicate. As well, n-gram phrase recognition is used to ...


2

I originally read you question as the number of indexed pages from your sitemap is 1500 and that you are worried. Then I thought about it. Perhaps there are things you need to know. If your site is new, then it will take quite a while for a new site to be indexed. I am not sure how old your site is, but it can take as much as a year for some sites to sink ...


2

I'm working on a website where a lot of the page content is generated by javascript by getting JSON from the server. .... Are these techniques alright when it comes to search engines indexing my site? ... just to save on bandwidth. This is a bad idea. What you're describing is that you have some basic HTML loaded and then a call to a special file on ...


1

The following is from the perspective of the HTML5 specification, based on the assumption that consumers (like search engines) will expect and work with what is specified in the HTML standards. In current practice, such markup details probably don’t matter much for SEO, but it can be important for other consumers and accessibility. I’ll use headings of the ...


1

The fragment identifier (ie. everything after the #) is not sent to the server, so unless you are using JavaScript/AJAX then your server won't be able to process these as URL parameters. (?) So, using a hash (#) would not seem to be a solution in your case as it simply won't work - unless I'm missing something? What's wrong with using a rel="canonical" ...


1

The WordPress Loop is an internal feature of WordPress and therefore has no effect on Google or any other major search engine. However, elements outside of the loop that are repeated on every page will be treated differently to what the main content is, this is normal and effects all websites no matter the platform they decide to use.


1

It depends on how strong the competitors in the UK are. If Google finds enough trusted sources in the UK (or UK-specific pages, eg international websites with a /en-GB/ section and the proper hreflang annotation), chances are that this could affect your visibility in the UK negatively. However, if your site is the most trusted source for your topic, it ...



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