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9

It is perfectly valid for the alt attribute to be blank, if the images are purely decorational. Otherwise, if you are outputting the same image over and over then it makes sense that the alt attribute be the same for all of them. There is no negative SEO benefit to that, and your cross/tick images are unlikely to rank in image searches anyway. One ...


7

First of all, use better alt attributes. Seriously, "Cross" and "Checkmark" are horrible alt attributes. To see why, try viewing your page in a text-only browser. With your HTML as it is, you'll see something like: Unregistered Basic Premium ------------------------------------------------------------------- ...


6

There is nothing wrong with having duplicate alt tags as its job is to describe the images for screen readers and users who have images disabled. So if you have the images on the page many times then it is likely you will have duplicate alt tags - it is semantically correct. Saying all that you could however describe your images differently for each one ...


6

You can remove the image from the td and just add it to the td instead. In your example you don't actually need the image, it has no content value, or SEO value. Because of that, you can do this: <td class="center Crossed" title="Cross"></td> .Cross{ background: url('/images/cross.png') no-repeat center center; height: 15px; } This has ...


4

If you use social media buttons on your site, it gives your users, flexibility to share their interest in your site with a click. Unless your site has content that can not be forgotten, no one will bother finding your page specially, on the social media sites they use. Therefore, it will also give you more interaction opportunities with your visitors. As ...


4

Unfortunately, you most probably won't be capable of measuring the SEO performance of the page before and after on-page optimization. The reason is you can't freeze the search engines for a period of time for your keywords. Search engines continue to calculate positions during the time where robots (web crawlers) index your page page for the first time and ...


3

I assume you're referring to http://www.andreexpress.be/diensten/ramenwasser/. Was the page's <title> tag ever "ramen en vitrines"? If you changed the title after Google indexed the page, Google is probably using a cached version of the page. Give them time to re-index the page and the title will be updated accordingly.


2

Social buttons allow and encourage users to share your content. Without it, it would be too much trouble to share your content and most people won't bother. The more your content is shared, the more users it reaches and the more opportunity you have to capture new users. Social buttons along with SEO are the single best things you can do fir traffic short of ...


2

When I want to do SEO changes and measure the results, I change half the pages on the site. This works best if you have a site with lots of similar pages that get similar amounts of search engine traffic. To make it work: Divide your pages into two groups, randomly if possible. I generally use the content id for each page and do even and odd. Exclude ...


2

If you remove pages you generally don't want to redirect them to a central location. When you do this, Google considers them "soft 404" and tries to treat them the same way as if you had just removed them and let them be 404 pages. I wouldn't redirect any pages to a sitemap or home page. The other possibility would be to use the meta rel canonical tag: ...


2

The four most used notifications are "error", "warning", "success" or "info". (usually colored red, yellow, green and blue) For "error" and "success" we take for granted that the user has started a process on the page before the notification triggered. Thus we can also assume that this notification will never be crawled, no matter how you've implemented it. ...


1

I'd put it in which ever one is going to be easier for you. I wouldn't sweat the bots if you decide HTML is easier. There are ways to mask sections of your page if that is a concern as referenced here: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/8821256/how-to-tell-google-bot-to-skip-part-of-html


1

Or option 5, 310 redirect all of your sub-domain pages http://capital-federal.enbuenosaires.com.ar/m-almagro/departamentos-ventas-es_AR.html to your parent domain pages http://www.enbuenosaires.com/almagro-ventas.html. I respect wanting to keep any PR and link juice you have. I understand the concern. It is a valid argument for retaining the sub-domain ...


1

I've worked on sites like this before where large sites were moved without redirects by people not understanding how redirects work. I had to use context clues found in the sites linking to the old version of the website to redirect the old URLs to the current ones. In one case the URLs weren't even friendly and that became a difficult task. I divide the ...


1

In SEO point of view, there is no risk to have a widget with the same text on all pages. Search engines like Google are capable of detecting that it's not the main content of each page. In general, duplicate content issues are generated by duplicating the main content of a page (not header, footer or a sidebar).


1

Use 301 redirects and drop the file extensions. I can point you to some authoritative articles that will help you make your decision on how to approach redirects, URIs and SEO in general. 1) 301 redirects is considered the 'best-practice.' You can read the MOZ (widely considered and authority on SEO) article for more details. 2) As for best-practices on ...


1

Answer: Because everyone else does it and social networks are obviously awesome. :) Alt Answer: Because it supposedly promotes sharing of your content Alt Alt Answer: There is no 'should' with regards to social sharing buttons. There's only 'should' with regards to making your website better—whatever better means to you on that site. More traffic? better ...


1

No, you don't need social sharing buttons as people are fed up with all that social websites anyway. Only a very little amount of people actually uses them and they sort of destroy your individul design. I would suggest not to use them, but offer a comment section instead. People will have much more courage to comment your post when they don't have to do it ...


1

I read your question and the comments. With respect to all of the commenters who all left excellent comments from my point of view, I think there is a missing element in these considerations. Small, but important. Your News and Archives pages will have more than one full article each and I assume other things too. It will not be an exact copy of your ...


1

I think " Universal properties created prior to December 2013 may temporarily report doubled Visits counts between the hours of 0500-0800 in the View timezone" and that "This issue corrects itself automatically. We are working on a fix to address this issue as soon as possible."


1

It would be much better practice to have the one destination accessible from different areas of the site. If you had for example store/productpage/theproduct and from wherever you place the product it was just to use this link then you avoid copied content and there is no need to redirect. If the pages have been indexed though then you may want to follow the ...


1

If two URLs are indexed by Google, it most probably considers that two URLs imply a duplicate content issue and it can penalize SEO of your two pages. A good way to avoid this is to implement 301 redirect from one URL to the other or use the rel="canonical" tag on one URL. Read the Google support page on duplicate content for more information.


1

Between these two pages (1 and 2), you definitively have duplicate content even if you change or add a word (like a country for example) in a blog post. Moreover, your URLs and <title> tags are almost the same. Search engines like Google are smart enough to identify this duplicate content and it will badly affect SEO of your two pages. If you have ...


1

I have no clue if this is going to work well, but neither have I if it's about AngularJS and SEO in general. There is very little evidence it works the way it is supposed to do. I would suggest leaving PhantomJS in the dark, it is known to have issues and is not very lightweight. Also considering you don't want to write/set up a backend I would use Firefox ...


1

Short answer. There is no SEO effect to domain names such as assemb.ly other than what we already know. All the other information you pointed to refers to geo-location and finding sites with particular target geo-locations. The reason why these tricks are used is because it is memorable and cute. It is a marketing ploy de jour. In fact, it can be misleading ...


1

If a page has content="nofollow" , google will not index the page and links inside that page also . so your iframe page also will not be indexed . Unless the iframe link is there from some other page also which doesnt have a no follow tag . or create a sitemap with the pages in that iframe and submit to google for indexing.



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