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4

Don't worry about small things like this. It's perfectly fine to have both links. Don't nofollow either of the links. With regard to the home page links… Having the logo linked to the homepage provides the conventional link to the root. http://ux.stackexchange.com/questions/81727/why-is-it-standard-for-a-website-logo-to-navigate-to-the-home-page Having ...


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In general, hyphenated URLs are better for seo than the id. Two main advantages - Google Ranking - The keywords in link have some ranking factor as it tells a lot about the content inside the page. Although this factor is just 1 out of only G knows how many. Higher CTR - I believe this is very important reason for having nice readable URLs. The keywords ...


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You should NOT use nofollow on one of the links. nofollow tells search engines that you can't vouch fer the authenticity of the link. It may have been automatically created by a user or spammer. If you tell search engines they can't trust one such link on the page, they will automatically assume they can't trust either link on the page. Using nofollow ...


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First of all, beware: canonical and hreflang at the same time sounds dangerous. You would have to use canonical only for duplication within the same language. Back to the main topic: Automatic redirection is not a good idea... You can read this from Google's documentation for international targeting: Avoid automatic redirection based on the user’s ...


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Google has gotten really good at reading & processing JavaScript-based content for web-search. For the most part, if the files (JS, CSS, as well as any AJAX/JSON/JSONP responses) aren't blocked by robots.txt and can be crawled normally, we'll be able to render the pages like a browser would, and will use that for web-search. I suspect at some point we'll ...


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There are many variables in place here. You need to ask yourself the following questions. Is your new layout responsive? Does your new layout load quickly for your users? Can your users find the content they're looking for quickly? Is your content above the fold? Did you keep your titles and headers the same? Google's algorithm takes many things into ...


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What I don't know is whether it also blocks the URL from showing up in search results, or just that particular content with that URL. If you have a noindex robots tag then the URL should not appear in the search results. (It should be noted, however, that if you block the crawling of this URL, eg. with robots.txt, then Google won't be able to see the ...


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Yes, that is the purpose of the alt tag on images: to provide alternate text if the image can't be read, in this case by a search engine. You can see this in action by looking at the text-only view of the Google cache of the page: the sentence looks normal and integrates the content of the alt attribute.


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You're probably right that search engines could have trouble identifying the right pages if the sitemap can't be edited, so only the old URLs will be listed there, not the new ones. If you can add new pages & create redirects, then this might be your best solution: Create your new pages Redirect (301) to them from the old URLs Create a new sitemap ...


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You're thinking right. Use 301 redirects from the old pages to the new pages. I'd recommend advertising only the new URLs in your sitemap that point to actual webpages with content people can see. It is not necessary to advertise the old URLs since Google automatically follows redirects. Eventually, Google will only index the new URLs and remove the old ...


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According to About AOL Search: These listings are administered, sorted and maintained by Google. ... For information on how Google sorts these listings, go to About Google. AOL is likely a bit behind Google in listing these, so you should probably just give a few days extra to catch up. Note that https://help.aol.com/articles/aol-search-faqs gives ...


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In the Google database, the single most important table of the schema is the document table which hosts the URL and document id. All other database tables and data elements rely completely on this. While there is a unique document id (allows for a smaller index size), the URL uniquely identifies a page since there cannot be two pages on any given URL. ...


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No! There will be no specific influence in your Google SERP if you use JavaScript in your webpage. In older days Google was not that much smart to fetch dynamically generating contents, JavaScript and AJAX but now Google algorithm is very smart to Crawl and Index those contents. Historically, SEO recommendations have centered around having ‘plain text’ ...


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well well well.... all is fine now, the urls are showing when I type info:url last night I've noticed that the number of indexed urls in my sitemap had dropped and I thought it was related to that. It turns out it is a bug in search console : https://twitter.com/methode/status/634308230940872704


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I found that using Google+ Pages to manage business listings caused this to happen for a client as well. Switching them over to Google My Business Locations fixed the problem. Also, verifying the locations with Google helps a great deal, either via phone or post.



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