Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

According to the HTML5 spec, "nav" is a "section" and a section "is content that defines the scope of headings and footers." The W3C example for the nav section shows h tags in the the nav. http://www.w3.org/TR/html5/sections.html#the-nav-element


6

Microformats is exactly what you're looking for.


6

You could use the itemref attribute. From the Microdata (W3C Working Group Note) spec: 4.2 The basic syntax: Properties that are not descendants of the element with the itemscope attribute can be associated with the item using the itemref attribute. This attribute takes a list of IDs of elements to crawl in addition to crawling the children of the ...


5

Google recommends using microdata, but it does support three formats: microdata, microformats, and RDFa. A big reason to choose microdata would be that the examples that Google gives on it's website and those on schema.org are in the microdata format. Here is a site that has a huge table of the various advantages and disadvantages of the three formats. ...


5

First and foremost, product search engines encourage contributors to utilize feeds which encode this type of metadata such that the product search engine does not have to scan raw HTML. Failing that, a relatively advanced product search engine might apply a product search heuristic to raw HTML which it scans. With sufficient input from its developers, such ...


5

I recommend reading the article from Smashing Magazine "HTML5 And The Document Outlining Algorithm" You will find detailed explanations on how to structure your html.


5

Pilgrim isn't alone in contending this. According to Jeremy Keith's HTML5 for Web Designers, you can use multiple <h1>s in a document without ruining the document summary, as long as they are nested within discrete semantic sectional tags. Quoting directly from the eBook (which I purchased from iBooks) So far, the new sectioning content isn’t ...


4

I saw some really crazy graphic novel + canvas experiments from Google a while ago. All the text was plain text (great accessiblity) but all the images could be plainly seen. I can't seem to find it, but 20 Things I Learned shows kind of what I mean. I'd say that's overkill for what you want to do, so I'd do this: <img src="page1.jpg" alt="Page 1" ...


4

While your checkbox idea is much more efficient, I think you would have to avoid stating it as a question for it to make sense. For instance: <label for="the_question">I would answer yes to this long winded question.</label> <input type="checkbox" name="the_question" id="the_question" value="1"> However, if your designers are dead set on ...


4

What makes you think this hasn't happened already/doesn't happen continuously? I remember a point where pages were recommended to stay below ~40k total. With pages easily averaging over 1.2M or so more recently, it would just be insane to think whatever that cutoff is doesn't get periodically adjusted. The real "problem" you're bringing up is that no engine ...


3

Google uses microdata for it's rich snippets. This in fact is additional markup predating HTML5. This gives exact information for search engines about products, recepies, businesses, events, and other things when crawling over the sites. Google mainly uses microdata based on schema.org's markup, but there are other markups as well. This way webmasters can ...


3

There is also the Search Engine schema.org ( http://schema.org ), which differ from microformats and generally use html attributes instead of things like classes for rich snippets.


3

You should take a look at "Never Mind The Bullets", done using HTML5 and canvas. I'm not sure how accessible it is, but you might find it gives you some ideas. Keep in mind, however, that the HTML5 approach rules out IE8 and below (IE9 is fine). Depending on your audience, that could be a non-starter.


3

HTML has a longdesc attribute that points to the URL of a 'long description'. Rather than lots of alt tags, why not use that?


3

During my extensive web searches I have found a quote which I find useful and suspect that future readers of this question will also. Use <h1> for top-level heading <h1> is the HTML element for the first-level heading of a document: If the document is basically stand-alone, for example Things to See and Do in Geneva, the ...


2

Oof, that's a tough one. It's really hard to present something like a graphic novel with good accessibility. Images are a lot better than PDF though, you're right about that one. Also, I wouldn't recommend putting the entire description of each pane as an alt text, let alone entire page. I think the best way would be to add paragraphs with transcripts and ...


2

Despite being (as of today) way too short for a subject like this, the Wikipedia article about Microdata (HTML5) still puts the relationship between the three common semantic markup approaches nicely: Microdata can be viewed as an extension of the existing microformat idea which attempts to address the deficiencies of microformats without the complexity ...


2

I disagree with both of the approaches. Mostly, if the "long winded question" really does have two answers then "Yes" and "No" are poor choices to offer. The options should be short phrases that state the decision being made. An example. Instead of this: Do you want to book conference accomodation now as a part of your ticket? ( ) Yes ( ) No do ...


2

I would tend to agree with Mark Pilgrim's interpretation. If you're enclosing your article inside of an article element, then you can start over again with an h1 heading for the article. In the HTML5 spec, articles are supposed to be treated as an independent, self-contained part of the page. You should be able to transplant the article element as is into ...


2

To my knowledge, none of the major search engines have made any definite proclamations on HTML5 as it pertains to SEO. As a result, beyond the usual good practice of well-formed, semantically correct code, we can do little more than speculate on that front. For advice on writing well-formed and semantically correct HTML5, I strongly recommend referring to ...


2

There currently is no microformatting for Q&A data. But I wouldn't be surprised to see it in the future as I can't imagine that the current few available formats are all there's going to be. I'm sure as microformats get flushed out and working examples become more prevalent we'll see an increase in the available microformats. Hopefully they'll be ...


2

Use the built-in content negotiation functionality with a type map. You may need to tweak your filenames / URLs or use rewrite rules after applying the type map.


2

RDF is a W3C standard for representing data using three-part { identifier, attribute name, attribute value} data structures. SPARQL is the query language for querying RDF data. The W3C's RDF Schema Language (RDFS) lets you declare classes, properties, and relationships between them using RDF, and their Web Ontology Language (OWL) lets you get fancier with ...


2

It won't hurt your SEO because Google establishes what is what on page regardless, things like breadcrumbs get detected by Google regardless of the positioning and markup used in the source code. However, if you want a semantic website then you should resolve this, a simple fix would be to edit your 'loop' in your WordPress, and if I'm not mistaken your ...


1

@lordzden your PHP as Stephen points out is invalid. Your echo should look like <?php $aggregate_rating = '6.5'; $total_reviews = '24'; echo '<div itemprop="aggregateRating" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/AggregateRating"><span itemprop="ratingValue">'. $aggregate_rating .'</span> stars for <span itemprop="reviewCount">'. ...


1

I've also run to additionalType property, which could be used as follows <div itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Event"> <span itemprop="name">some event</span> <span itemprop="startDate">2002-02-02</span> <!-- .... zillion other HTML stuff ... --> <div itemprop="additionalType" itemscope ...


1

@Guisasso is correct you just don't close the element. But on another note your not restricted to using schema just within the DIV elements and using the spans as it suggests (mere examples). If the whole page is about event related stuff and this is across the site then it might make more sense to use the body element which means your template if you have ...


1

If I understand your question correctly, just don't close that div. <div itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Event"> <span itemprop="name">some event</span> <span itemprop="startDate">2002-02-02</span> <!-- ....zillion other HTML stuff... --> <div itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/ExerciseAction"> ...


1

It’s totally fine (and often useful, and of course valid) to have an image as heading. You could even use audio or video as heading. HTML is content agnostic in that sense. However, in every case you should provide alternative text content (for user-agents that don’t support the media (e.g. search engines) and/or for users that can’t access them). A typical ...


1

Many people assume that you should only ever use one H1 on the page otherwise it dilutes the actual content of the page, this simply isn't true. A H1 Company name and then a H1 for the content is absolutely valid by all means. Google has the ability to work out which is the content of the page and what is not, such as headers and footers. If are still ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible