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It depends on your site. If you run a special site involving high security and you want only select individuals located in several different countries with certain browsers to access your site and a login (or something unique to the user) is required to access the majority of the content on the site, then I'd say go for HTTPS. If you have a generic site ...


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If an attacker is able to put himself between your origin server and CloudFront endge location - it won't be so difficult for him to capture your HTTP traffic and extract your information. Theoretically, it can be done on side of your ISP. It is called as a "Man-in-the-middle" attack: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Man-in-the-middle_attack If you trust your ...


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You can check if your SSL is patched against the OpenSSL CCS vulnerability (CVE-2014-0224): sudo apt-get changelog openssl | grep CVE-2014-0224 If no results are displayed then your server requires updating! do the following: sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install openssl libssl-dev sudo openssl version -a If you do get changelog results or both ...


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If you're going to move to HTTPS, the right kind of redirect to use is a 301 redirect, which says you've moved the page permanently to a new spot. About the use of 301 redirects when moving to a new domain, Google says the following: If you can do those [301] redirects to do the granularity of page level to page level, that's a great user experience. ...


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AWS loadbalancers have the ability to handle all the encryption. That means that you put the certificate only on the load balancer. Client web browsers connect to the load balancer via HTTPS. The load balancer then connects to your instances via HTTP. In that configuration the load balancer is the only place that needs the certificate. The individual ...


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It is possible to renew the certificate without doing the challenges again? I have the private key for the certificate, so can't they validate the domains based on that? With the private key you could only prove that you are in the possession of the private key. You could not prove that you own the domain too. But a certificate should be used to ...


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Since the documentation link provided is for Windows, one doesn't have access to the private key until after the certificate request has been completed. This is the last step mentioned in your documentation (SSL Certificate Importing Instructions: DigiCert Certificate Utility). With the certificate properly installed you may be able to export the ...


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Simple answer: you can't; it doesn't work like that. A CSR is derived from the private key, not the other way around. If that were possible, then Certificate Authority would be able to derive your private key from the CSR you give them, and ideally your private key should never leave your server. Check with DigiCert to confirm, but the tool probably ...


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It doesn't matter where the CSR is generated as long as its generated in a compatible format, i.e OpenSSL, IIS, Microsoft Exchange and Keytool. It's extremely common for people to use different devices to create their SSL CERT. You can even use 3rd party online websites to generate the SSL cert, meaning you don't need to run anything from the commandline. ...


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What they're really doing with this question is trying to decide which of several possible formats you want the certificate delivered in, without actually asking you. Choose Apache -- even if you aren't using Apache -- because this should get you the certificate and chain files you need, in an easily usable format for anything in AWS. This is the standard ...


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These are really two separate questions: if you're thinking of implementing AMP, that shouldn't affect your choice between HTTP and HTTPS in any way. So you have two choices to make: "do you want to implement AMP?" (and it sounds like you do); and "do you want to go HTTPS?", for which I've written an answer here.



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