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40

This is not uncommon as there is no time frame for Google to index a website. The best thing you can do is to give Google every opportunity to find you. Try all of the following: Submit your website to Google. Submit an XML sitemap. You can do that from within your Webmaster Control panel. Most content management systems have a sitemap generator of some ...


9

Google periodically scan web. Might be your site is not scanned till now. Checklist Ensure your robots.txt file is not blocking Google. Ensure your pages are linked and are crawler-able by Google's Bot Ensure sitemap.xml is located in the correct path or if using a custom page then you will need to manually submit it too Google and other search engines. ...


7

First, I hope you put a proper 301 redirect for any page in your htaccess. If some of your pages require parameters, like example.com/?p=20, then you need to use mod_rewrite with [R=301] instead of the easier mod_alias Redirect directive in your htaccess. Also, until Google Bot comes again and indexes, it will not update the Google index. Second, it will ...


7

I ended up drilling down to the problematic sub-folder through searching for site:domain.com/foo/bar/ but in my search I did come across a method for getting the search results into an excel file. Open up a Google Docs spreadsheet and use this formula: =importXml("www.google.com/search?q=site:domain.com&num=100&start=1"; "//cite") It will only ...


6

Unfortunately there is no way to get a full list of every indexed page in Google. Even milo5b's solution will only get you at most 1,000 URLs. It sounds like you have some duplicate content issues. In Webmaster Tools, check in Health > Index Status and it will show you a cumulative total of pages indexed over time. If the graph makes a big leap at one point ...


6

The inner quotes are still recognized as a control character in the query (note that Google strips out all non-alphanumeric characters except control characters when running a query - you can add apostrophes, periods, and commas to the query without altering the search results). Your effective search on the first go was: "Submitting values of " jQuery ...


6

I'd say that once you submit your sitemap and request a recrawl then Googlebot should start crawling and indexing again as you hope. From our point of view, once we're able to recrawl and reprocess your URLs, they'll re-appear in our search results. There's generally no long-term damage caused by an outage like this, but it might take a bit of ...


5

"They" [that means google, everyone else mirrors the methods hoping to mirror the success] are factoring in two things (quite interconnected to each other actually): Users' true intent: sometimes relevant results may not contain some of the terms put in the query, so they run a sort of fuzzy logic. In your example, maybe they thought that even if you ...


5

Don't forget the concept of domain aging either. If you slap up a new site on a brand new Domain name, expect Google and the others to de-emphasize it for a time period of at least several months. This doesn't explain flat out omission as you're seeing, but it does explain why it's incredibly uncommon to see a site shoot directly to the top of the search ...


5

If you have a country specific TLD (eg. .nl - Netherlands) then you can't specify the geographic target in Google Webmaster Tools - it is already set to whatever region matches the TLD. You can only specify the region yourself if you have a generic (non-country specific) TLD such as .com or .org. However, this does not mean that your site won't appear on ...


5

The CTR is always a calculation of clicks divided by actual impressions of your link. The Webmaster Tools help page says the same, so the last statement would be true.


5

It's well known that Google tends to favor user generated content […] You're basing that blanket statement on what? Your logic seems backwards, plus overly simplistic. Google favors authoritative content. (For some values of authoritative, and not always the same ones.) Those two examples just so happen to be user-generated. And one of them for narrow ...


5

This is a really good question! However, the answer can be found relatively easily with a site:stackoverflow.com "A language-independent collaboratively" search. The first thing you need to know: https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/35624?rd=1 We use a number of different sources for this information, including descriptive information in the ...


4

The general rule of thumb is you don't want to change URLs. Changing URLs means links pointing to those pages and bookmarks referencing those pages can break, leading people to an error. From an SEO standpoint, you also lose any authority assigned to that particular URL (like links referencing that URL) if you suddenly remove that URL from your website. You ...


4

A fresher is somebody with little experience, so you are correct, Google is showing results that mean exactly the opposite of what you want. Google uses algorithms to automatically determine what words mean based on their usage. Their algorithm has determined that "fresher" means "experienced" rather than "inexperienced". Bugs like this in Google ...


3

You need to include the "/" URL in your Sitemap file and specify it as the hreflang "x-default". That way, Google will know that this is a part of your set of pages, and will be able to handle it appropriately. Note that hreflang is a signal, and not a directive for Google, so it might be that the "/" URL still occasionally shows up.


3

This is expected behaviour. When you add more keywords to your search you add more possibilities of pages within your site to match any of those keywords. Search engines work on the assumption of an or search criteria meaning "show any pages that matches "another" or "keyword". Words that match both are just considered more relevant than those that do not. ...


3

Bing may change titles in their SERPs (Just like Google). See Bing’s blog post How Does Bing Choose The Title For My Web Page?: Sometimes, despite a webmaster’s best efforts, Bing may choose to serve a title that is different to the title of a web site or document. Why "My social networks"? Maybe because it is your first heading on the homepage, which ...


3

This is a symptom of a hacked site. The malware is adding this content. It may be adding it just for Googlebot and then redirecting users somewhere else. Google Webmaster Tools may be able to tell you more information. Look at the content keywords for your site: If unexpected keywords, such as "Viagra", appear on this page, this could be a sign that ...


3

Not sure if this is really an answer, more an observation, but anyway... It seems that if Google is able to extract an obvious breadcrumb trail from the page then it will show this in the search results, rather than the actual URL. The breadcrumb trail in the SERPs never includes the final (leaf) page, only the breadcrumb trail that leads to that page (so ...


3

It could be the case that, in the states with more snow, there are more companies that offer similar services/products to yourself. If this is the case it may explain why you've had only 2 sales in these states, due to the higher level of competition online. You can check visitors from specific states within Google Analytics: Audience > Geo > Location > ...


3

Question 1: What you're asking about is called Geolocation - Google shows different results depending on the geographic region you're searching from/interested in. For example, if you're in the US but append your search with 'UK' it will show you the US rankings with a huge tilt toward UK based websites. This isn't to say it shows you a UK SERP - but the ...


3

The exact mechanism is currently only known to Google, you can find their cryptic help document here. What you need to do to get this process started is the following things - Have a well defined menu and proper internal linking. The best way to do this is first figure out the Information Architecture of your site and then go about linking the pages. For. ...


3

This data that you have highlighted in your screenshot of search results in known as rich snippet data. By using Schema markup, you can provide search engines with more information about the type of content your website contains. You can see an example of the BlogPosting Schema markup that you'd need for this here. As per your screenshot, you can also see ...


3

Not all of the pages get crawled - Google does not look at everything. Use the Fetch as Google tool to fetch and then index the missing pages. You should also submit a sitemap to Google Webmaster tools.


3

This is just another case of two or more URLs pulling up the same content. You have two ways you can handle this: Do a 301 redirect from the URLs you do not want to show in the search results to the one that you do want to show. Use canonical URLs <link rel="canonical" href="http://www.12345.com/example.html" />


2

You could write a script that parses Google's SERP (for example PHP + Curl) and store each link in a CSV file. Be careful to have your script behave like a human, because Google could ban your IP from search results for a few hours if you abuse this.


2

In addition to Evgeny's very good points, it should be noted that the Google Webmaster's tool allows you to specify a preferred domain, either with or without the www prefixes. Google's explanation of this option follows: The preferred domain is the one that you would like used to index your site's pages. If you specify your preferred domain as ...


2

This does not seem possible, although it may depend on your particular webserver, but I strongly doubt this. As far as I know, www.example.com and www.example.com/ are the same thing. PHP certainly treats then that way too (if you use parse_url() on both you get exactly the same results). The first rule of your robots.txt allows the root of the site to be ...


2

Speculation (as it always is with SEO): 1) Your first search occurred while Google was updating its index and you caught it at a moment when SO was 8th due to whatever Google does when they do their updates. I see sites that I run that are ranked number one occasionally come up somewhere else in the top ten briefly but they always return to number 1 ...



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