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Google is assuming (correctly) that people don't always know exactly what they're searching for but that they'll recognise it as soon as they see it. They keep a sort of list of associated terms for each keyword, that had been gathered historically from all sort of places - not necessarily your current landing page. They're mostly synonyms, but not just that ...


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Google has many methods to differentiate, what things mean: is phd an abbreviation of doctor of philosophy or of pizzahutdelivery. But, in some cases, all these methods fail. Causes, why they fail, are different too: but mostly all these causes are located on the searcher's side. They could be like: setting cookies off, searching search history off, ...


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You can simply block the url which you coded in FETCH AS GOOGLE.


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It's not quite a case of Google choosing to replace the keyword with Not Provided. The issue here is that Google runs all of Google search using HTTPS. A safety restriction built into all browsers is not to provide the referrer header when the referrer is a HTTPS site, this is an intentional security feature. The way most libraries have worked in the past to ...


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What I finally did was to always block the price to bots. Used a code similar to this: function _bot_detected() { if (isset($_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT']) && preg_match('/bot|crawl|slurp|spider/i', $_SERVER['HTTP_USER_AGENT'])) { return TRUE; } else { return FALSE; } } More info at: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/677419/how-to-...


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I encountered this problem using Sphider myself. In the end the only solution was to use Sphider Pro and manually access the database after installation and manually update the password to suit what I needed. Have not been able to find out what caused the original glitch but this is the only workaround I have been able to find that worked for me.


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One of the best ways to manage this sort of search for content is: (in the Google search bar) site:yoursitename.com and see what is indexed. Then remove your plug-in. Work manually for best results. First: go to https://www.xml-sitemaps.com/ or a similar site and get a sitemap. Then EDIT it so that you have only the pages (new ones). Next upload this and ...


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A week isn't all that long (though I know it sure feels like it is). Steps you can take include: Double/triple check your 301 redirects are pointing to the correct new URLs. Ensure your sitemap.xml includes all of the new URLs and none of the old. Resubmit the sitemap in Google Search Console. Check your canonical tags include the new URLs. Look at any ...


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There are two ways you could handle it - unfortunately both are not ideal solutions... You could remove the microformats markup from your pages - but this will affect the people both in the US and outside looking at your results You could create different versions of your website for different countries to be indexed in results for these countries. This ...



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