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22

Your website has been compromised and it is being used by blackhat SEOs. This is a pretty common thing amongst spammers and the like. Take a look at: My site's been hacked - now what?, by Google. Download a backup of your website. Make sure that you also backup the database, not just the files. Get in contact with your web host and explain the situation. ...


6

Both of those would work, but they would also block anything else in those directories. If you only want to block that specific URL, you could do: Disallow: */blah/assets/ico/favicon.png Do you have a Google Webmasters Account setup? If so they have a new robots.txt test page where you can see if a URL is blocked or not based on your robots file. EDIT: ...


5

Looks like you've been 'hacked'. Someone found a method to upload pages to your server en got them indexed. Go through your site/database and do a deap search for those keywords. Tip: with the commandline you can find and sort files on last edit date (this does last 25): find . -type f -printf '%T@ %p\n' | sort -n | tail -25 | cut -f2- -d" " After ...


4

I have had this happen to me a while back on a shared server. Wayne Whitty's list is pretty comprehensive, but I wanted to include that the attacker also added their own key under .ssh/authorized_keys and was able to reinfect my site after I removed everything. I'm not sure if this is the case in your setup, but being on a shared server can expose you to ...


2

As a rule, what makes sense for semantic markup and accessibility usually also makes sense for SEO, and you should certainly not damage usability or code quality for the sake of any SEO that Google have not recommended to webmasters. On-site SEO should be about helping Google index your site thoroughly and accurately, and not trying to find loopholes in ...


2

Firstly, you shouldn't block your favicon image unless you have a very good reason. What exactly is the 'blah' supposed to represent in your example? If the URL is as you state in the question, you should just use: Disallow: /assets/ico/favicon.png That will prevent crawling of the specific image. To block the whole ico directory, use: Disallow: ...


1

You are going to need a scripting language such as PHP to generate html pages from the content of the iframe. The content's html code will need to reside directly inside the shell pages when it is served to search engines. On the shell page, instead of displaying the iframe, the scripting language will generate html code for the shell page content area. ...


1

Google knows what is what before your visitors do Google's crawlers have really advanced since there first launch, their crawlers has the ability to detect actual content area, the width of that content as well as the height of the actual content region. Repeated Content Elements such as headers, footers and sidebars that get repeated on several or all ...


1

It depends on the implementation of the URL shortener in question. If implemented in an SEO friendly way, then using a URL shortener will not hurt your SEO efforts compared to direct linking. For a URL shortener to be SEO friendly, it should: Use 301 permanent redirects not 302 temporary redirects framesets meta refresh Allow crawlers to access it ...


1

Manual penalties are rare, and most will be algorithmically generated. This means that any penalties caused by on-site black-hat SEO should go when you upload a new site. I imagine the only real penalties you have to worry about are from bad backlinks. Check these, and if there are lots of spam links (directory / articles etc) pointing to your homepage, ...


1

Images are page signals and factors of many... Images always help because they are one of many signals using the ALT to inform Google what the page is about, however to say they are needed is also false, its one of many factors. Google can establish factors from many other signals such as TITLE, Meta, Content and so on. Write content for your visitors not ...


1

If you google "sites.google.com", then it lists plenty of sites hosted there. However, as it is not using sub-domains to create the URLs, search engines will most likely see each site as simply a sub-page of the single massive sites.google.com website (with 53,900,000 results in the listings), rather than a website of its own (with a dozen or so pages). ...


1

Google should be able to handle all versions of SSL/TLS. The best way to see how Google handles something is via Google Webmaster Tools. Note: You have to have your site setup in Webmaster Tools for this to work. It's something you should consider anyway. Go to Webmaster Tools Select your site Select Crawl Select Fetch as Google



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