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No they will not cause any issues (nor do you need to do any kind of redirect). RFC 3986 (the official URI spec) specifies a "Reference Resolution" section which states any path segments (between slashes) containing only dots should be removed. Single dots are removed entirely while double dots essentially remove the previous directory from the URL. Also ...


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AOL hasn't powered its own search engine for over a decade it now uses Google search. SOURCE In fact, in June of 1999 Netscape Search was updated and AOL/Netscape search began to be powered by Google bringing their search volume to approximately 3 million per day; huge for the time. More related information can be found on AOL's website: ...


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For future readers, I would like to say this. Unless you have been a really bad spammer, porn site, or something just plain horrible, there is no need to move your site to another domain to repair your placement in search engines. You are actually making the problem worse. You lose any of the positive metrics your domain name has amassed over the years at ...


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No. It's a different domain, and even though your .com started failing, you can recover the old good SEO status. Actually, you didn't need to ask this question: The first result for a search for techhamlet is your .net site :)


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Ideally you will have a rewrite rule that will strip it out by doing a permanent redirect (301). That way, These URLs will never be resolved, only the correct one.


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You have to use the 301 header when redirecting the page. This way you're telling Google that the page has moved and it will index it. Google has recently announced that it will offer a boost to SSL websites.


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The new page will be indexed and the old page will be removed from the index, assuming the content of both page is the same and that one has not left a canonical URL to the HTTP URL in the HTTPS version. Yes, search engines are fine with HTTPS.


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As of September 14th, 2014, the googlebot does NOT support tls 1.2. You get notified about 100% inaccessibility and thats it. I am affected by this directly. Using TLS 1.2 SSL enforcement to get on my page. Here is the proof that google doesn't like to crawl tls 1.2 pages as of now:



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