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50

A single powerful server can only be upgraded so far. Once you have the most powerful server available, your site cannot grow more without splitting it between servers or making it more efficient. There is also the cost factor. A single server that is super powerful may cost ten times as much as two servers that are half as powerful. You want to be able ...


30

From Rear Admiral Grace Hopper: On the building of bigger computers: "In pioneer days they used oxen for heavy pulling, and when one ox couldn't budge a log, they didn't try to grow a larger ox. We shouldn't be trying for bigger computers, but for more systems of computers." source


10

Stephen explains the major consideration to make when deciding on a systems architecture: the tradeoff in vertical and horizontal scaling. I'll add a few other considerations: Separation of concerns: you mention multiple radically different systems: reverse proxies, DB, content servers, etc. From a maintenance and security standpoint it is clearly ...


8

Size limit. We like to pretend that a single box with multiple processors, memory chips and disks is uniform. This isn't entirely true, but it's true enough if your numbers don't get too big. There are technical limits on heat, energy, proximity etc. which means there'll always be a practical limit on how big a single server can be. Scalability - there's a ...


7

Let's take the problem at small scale. A tiny office with one server running mail, ActiveDirectory, file share, and the web site for the company. Hackers hit it and you have to reboot because IIS is messed up. Or Exchange needs an update and a reboot. Or Active Directory got corrupted. Any of these isolated "one service is down" problems affects the ...


6

Programming with an eye towards scalability is desirable, but it can also be very limiting. The truth is that 95% of sites will never need to worry about scalability. Unless you plan to have more than 10,000 pages on your site (such as might be accumulated by collecting lots of user generated content), I wouldn't worry about scalability. Just choose your ...


4

Sorry to say but your friend isn't correct. Wordpress, Drupal and even Joomla can handle millions of visitors a day and is purely down to the hardware you use. Of course some content managements systems are heavier than others but again this can be overcome by optimizing your database and using quality hardware such as a Scalable cloud, Scalable VPS or even ...


4

Some quick Googling gave me this: http://sldn.softlayer.com/wiki/index.php/SoftLayer_Network_ContentDelivery_Authentication_Token Looks like, at least with SoftLayer, you can set a token on the user's machine that lets them authenticate with the CDN, thus allowing access to the content. I'm sure this ability varies based on CDN.


2

The problem here is that you're not setting a relative width for the background. You are positioning it, but not setting the width. You can set the size by using the background-size property like this: .newheader{ background-size:100% 100%; } or to combine with the other background properties: .newheader{ background:url("../img/slide1.jpg") ...


2

While the above answers are good explanations, I think the direct answer you're looking for is called "load balancing". You may not need to worry about it in most cases, but it's not a complicated concept to implement if needed. Basically you'll look at your database and it's structure, caching, and your hardware. For example in a standard WordPress or ...


2

As someone suggested a CDN with a token system should allow you to generate tokens for users, but this will likely end up in reducing the performance to that of delivering your files from the same server or worse.


1

If one tries to have one machine do the work of two, some parts of the machine will need to be larger but run at the same speed, some can stay the same size but will need to run faster, and some will need to be larger and faster. The extent to which it makes sense to combine the roles of smaller machines into a larger one, or split the roles of larger ...


1

You could look at a VPS (Virtual Private Server, sometimes referred to as a blade), which basically is a large server shared with multiple users, but in a way they can not interfere with eachother (one could be using 100% of its CPU without you knowing so). They can easily be upgraded, you can add memory, or cpu, or bandwidth, or all of it, just by going to ...


1

Yes and as much as possible. Even optimizing a single image has an impact. It saves bandwidth for your visitors and your servers. Optimizing a million images is a million times more advantageous. Nobody wants to go anything a million times, so automate everything you can. Every effort saved gets multiplied the larger your data is. From this, you can ...


1

You can consider moving your site to the cloud so that you can almost have unlimited scalability but still pay for what you use.



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