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24

A lot of people may use twitter now but I personally use both and still prefer how rss or atom feeds allow me to see the article without having to worry about whether the shortened URL in the tweet actually takes me to where I hope it is going. Security researchers may appreciate rss since not everyone can see who is subscribing to your feeds, which I ...


11

Auto-discovery still works for most feed-readers, for instance with Google Reader I just tested out this page and plugged the exact URL in the subscribe text input. It then automatically subscribed to the comments for this question. So no, providing an image with a link is just a visual way of letting users know that there's an RSS feed available if they're ...


10

Yes, many people are using it. I have a website with about 40k daily visitors, and the RSS feed has about 9K readers. People read RSS (or Atom) feeds in Google Reader, fetch data from it to automatically post to other site, and you can also use it to push messages to Facebook/Twitter. Or as I'm using for some feed, add it to Feedburner so that you can have ...


7

If you look at the source code for your Tumblr site, you'll see a feed auto-discovery link in the head section that'll look like this: <link rel="alternate" type="application/rss+xml" href="/rss"> Copy that line, and in your text editor, change it to: <link rel="alternate" type="application/rss+xml" href="http://domain.tumblr.com/rss"> ...


7

RSS feeds are usually just XML documents that are generated dynamically every time a reader requests them. They contain only as many recent posts as it is set by the tool you use. They do not contain all previous entries unless you specifically tell them to, should it be possible in the CMS you use. However, feed readers like Google Reader keep extensive ...


7

I am here via RSS (Hacker News) as well. I don't have time to sift through every website I like to keep up on, therefore I use a newsreader that let me know when a website is updated. I prefer it over email because it keeps my news separate from my mail. Think of it as a newspaper vs. regular mail. Most of the techie people I know (I work in a software ...


7

Yes, people still use RSS. I use it heavily to get quality and regular content every day. In fact, I saw the link to this question from my RSS feed.


7

To display content from another site, you need permission. Most sites that have RSS feeds do give this permission. RSS feeds are designed to share content, often for syndication. Permission is usually readily available for republishing RSS feeds. The BBC does give such permission for republishing their RSS feeds. Here are the Terms and Conditions for ...


6

Use a tool like FeedBurner which has integration with Google Analytics.


6

@smashingmag is a great Twitter feed, they regularly post links to interesting blog articles.


6

Personally, I wouldn't worry too much about it. Just make sure the benefit of stopping them outweighs the time spent trying to do it. It can easily be a losing battle, even if you win. That said, there are a few options available to you. Find out if they are copying from your RSS feed or scraping your page. Add an user-friendly excerpts with links back to ...


6

Not sure why people think Twitter replaces RSS feeds. Using a reader you can follow many sites and get a nice list or sub lists (by topic) of the new headlines without opening the individual pages for each site. So yes "still" use RSS. - Oh I see you let the masses choose for you...


5

It depends on the terms and conditions of the website whose work you are reproducing. The published works of others is copyrighted so you cannot reproduce it without their explicit permission which may be given in their terms of service. You should definitely contact them to ask them for permission before doing it. FYI, Google is cracking down on copied ...


5

Why not offer both? It's not hard to do and you give users a choice between: Atom - More precise then RSS RSS - The defacto standard for content syndication Then someone can choose which best suits their needs. If they're not sure, then it won't matter to them anyway. But if you had to choose, go with RSS. It's by far the most widely used and the odds ...


5

I've got about 300 different RSS feeds in my reader, with 17050 entries combined. They allow me to track game releases, news on Perl, new pages on web comics, and much more. More importantly though: They remind me when a site i liked half a year back publishes something new. They make me come back without having to remember to go back there manually. I do ...


5

It's such a small amount of data on each page request I include both the link and something on the page to allow users to subscribe on browsers that don't support it. FYI, it's never been part of Chrome. I love Chrome except for the fact I sometimes have to manually find this tag in the HTML of the page.


5

RSS helps users browse your site in an aggregated format without having to visit the site. There is some evidence to suggest that feeds help keep your site 'freshness' up in search engine rankings so they are worth the effort, but how much this affects your ranking is anyone's guess. Sitemaps helps search engines index your site and better understand when ...


5

I remember the icon was first used in Mozilla Firefox, and later adapted by Microsoft to be used in their Internet Explorer. Since then, it has became the web standard that the orange-colored icon symbolizes the RSS icon. I don't think there's any specific reason to use the RSS icon in its orange color, as various designers (showcased through web design ...


4

I can think of 3 ways - 1) Google Spreadsheets' ImportHtml function can help you selectively scrape content from any website. You can then embed this spreadsheet data as a widget 2) Use YQL. Requires a little programming but the grunt work is simplified 3) Check this article on creating an RSS feed of any website without requiring software or having to ...


4

I can't believe I will be the first one to post this: http://www.alistapart.com/


4

RSS is a tool. It's used by subscribers to quickly/easily see when a site they're interested in is updated/adds new content. If you think your feed subscribers would like to be notified of such updates and might be interested in viewing it (possibly even for the first time), then sure add it to the feed. If you think most of your subscribers wouldn't care ...


4

WordPress creates feeds at [site_url]/feed/ by default. Check there e.g. www.example.com/feed. There should also be a link added to all pages in the <header>: <link rel="alternate" type="application/rss+xml" title="website title Feed" href="[site_url]/feed/" /> The title is usually pulled from your WordPress site description, editable in ...


3

Put it on every page. Your goal is to get people to subscribe to your feed and you want to take advantage of every opportunity to get them to do so. Since all that tag does (in the major browsers) is put the RSS icon in the address bar it's hardly intrusive. So put it in the <head> of every page and maximize the chances of someone subscribing.


3

You should have a link to your RSS feed in your <head> so browsers and other user agents can offer users a chance to subscribe to it through the RSS icon in their address bar (or however it chooses to show them there is an RSS feed available). Because this is the default way to offer an RSS feed it is safe to assume search engines also know what to do ...


3

Very simply, the disadvantage is that some particularly strict feed readers might refuse to process your feed if it's not valid. I don't know any specific feed readers that do that. If you want to fix your feed, you'll have to look at the specific error messages given by the feed validator. For example, the feed from nytimes.com occasionally uses an (X)HTML ...


3

I for one use RSS a lot. Besides getting updates from favorite websites and blogs I also subscribed to RSS feed of: links saved for reading later (pinboard.in) popular links from my Twitter stream (tweetedtimes.com) several email newsletters (mmmmail.com) This way, whenever I got some time for reading on the web I just fire reederapp.com dive into my ...


3

As alluded to in the comments, you'll need a database holding your content to be able to automate your feed. We don't know from your question how comfortable with PHP you are or if you have any database experience, but this would almost certainly speed up other things in your site too - such as being able to serve each of your 'content' pages from one ...


3

It is not possible to retrieve facebook photo data through RSS, you can however use the API which retrieves the data in json format. You just need to know the specific id of the album you want to get the data from. For instance, if I'd wanted to get the photos from this album: ...


3

Whether you "should" is your own decision. But there are different ways to approach it if you do. Some sites just edit the original post directly, and tack something like "[UPDATED]" on to the headline. [example at VentureBeat] This has two potential effects, which cover everyone: If someone's feedreader hadn't already fetched the item, then it will show ...



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