Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

19

Don't forget that while the monitor might be larger than 800x600 the browser window might not be full screen. For example I'm running on LCD monitors with 1600x1200 resolution (still quite large) but my browser window is 1100x1200 (approximately). So you need to look at the most common browser resolution, not the most common screen resolution.


16

According to W3Counter 800 x 600 accounts for approximately 2.56% of users' browser resolution: 1 1024x768 23.72% 2 1280x800 18.42% 3 1280x1024 10.21% 4 1440x900 8.18% 5 1366x768 6.82% 6 1680x1050 5.19% 7 800x600 2.56% 8 1920x1080 2.37% 9 1152x864 2.11% 10 1024x1024 2.06% Since that number is lower then IE6's ...


12

Don't forget more and more people are using Smart Phones (and sometimes even not so smart phones) to view sites. Netbooks are also proliferating. Designing your site to look good for users with lower resolution is in some ways more important now than it has ever been.


6

Do not re-save as JPG (or do once as much, at hi quality). Every time you do it, you add new quality loss. Work in PNG format, and only if you need it, save last version as JPG. tweakPNG tool allows you to remove extra data, but beware not removing essential data(this is not a compressing tool). For compressing it well, I agree on using PNGcrush. I my ...


6

Google Browser Size http://browsersize.googlelabs.com/ This is a super tool which should fill all your needs, allowing you to even load in a URL and see what it looks like in different resolutions.


4

Try the Smush.it image optimization tool. It is a "lossless" tool, which means it optimizes the images without changing their look or visual quality.


4

You're confusion lies in the fact that you are incorrect in saying that pixels aren't physical. Physically, your monitor has LEDs of 3 different colors (red, green, blue). Each set of these three colored LEDs is a pixel (how they are arranged can make even this concept much more complicated but lets think of them all being perfectly square and all one unit ...


4

That entirely depends on your user base, for a commercial site I work on 1024x768 represents 9.49% (166,453) of our visitors, we will continue to support that for some time. The flip side to that, a hobby project that I work on has a different audience and I don't support 1024x768 as it only represents about 2%. Check your existing stats and use that to ...


3

There are up-to-date stats at http://gs.statcounter.com/ Just select "Screen resolution" from the stat dropdown. At the time of this writing, it seems that 1366 * 768 is the rage.


3

The current GoogleBot Smartphone agent, as tested with the 'Fetch as Google' Tool is essentially a fake iPhone using a headless Webkit Safari 6.0 Engine, running on a Linux x86_64 desktop machine. The default non-responsive viewport width is that of an iPhone at 980px. With a viewport <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, ...


3

One resolution that may be pretty common, but is often forgotten, is 1024x600. It's used by many netbooks. Together with window title, menu and task bar, this leaves just about 500 px. So I wouldn't completely disregard the vertical space...


3

As of Feb 24, 2011, I go with the following page widths: 960px, fixed centered - for non-mobile web visitors if the site isn't for affiliate marketing. I may use either a 10px or 20px margin inside that, but the "white" part of the page is 960px width. 750px, fixed centered - for sales pages (landing pages) for affiliate marketers. This is because we ...


2

You could try pngcrush, which is a command line tool to optimize PNG file sizes. Its main purpose is to reduce the size of the PNG IDAT datastream by trying various compression levels and PNG filter methods Again, this is a lossless compressor, and I believe is actually what smush.it (mentioned in mvark's answer) uses behind the scenes.


2

Boy, it's going to be tough to give you any sort of "real" answer (this is only an answer due to character limits on comments), and even harder to back it up. First of all, I would say ignore w3schools. Anyone who tells you all flavors of IE combined make up 26% of users is clearly skewed towards savvy users. Another thing to keep in mind is that while I ...


2

I would recommend you to use a responsive theme for your site or make your site responsive. This way you can eliminate all the possibilities of resolution problems. eg: Wikipedia uses responsive design To try how this resposnive design in Wikipedia works just adjust your browser sizez and see how the site adapts to that browser size .


2

Google's bots do not view a page in any resolution due to the fact they do not render the page as you would expect from a browser, therefor resolution is irevelant but you should aim for standard media queries that support a range of devices. Google's mobile bot will view the media queries you have in the CSS file and estiblish from the Max-width resolution ...


1

The operating system must be able to change the resoution, because it must support different displays. But each LCD monitor has a native resolution, and only when you use this resolution, the picture looks sharp. If you use another resolution, for example 640*480 on a 1024*728 Monitor, then the monitor itself will upscale the picture, so that 1 original ...


1

From The 72 PPI Web Resolution Myth: The size at which an image appears on your screen depends only on two things – the pixel dimensions of the image and the display resolution of your screen. As long as you’ve set your screen to its native display resolution...then an image will be displayed pixel-for-pixel. In other words, each pixel in the image will ...


1

Turns out multiple resolutions from a single visitor/browser is completely possible. Google Analytics asks the browser for the screen.width variable, which IE (and apparently Firefox) change when the user zooms in. Sources: Answer on related technical question I posted on StackOverflow w3schools screen.width TryIt javascript snippet (try hit "submit ...


1

Firefox now has this feature built in. Under "Web Developer" click "Reponsive Design View"


1

I wondered if you wanted a techique to make your site always display xyz pixels wide? If so, I added this to my .css ..#Content { width:985px; margin:0px auto; text-align:left; } Then in my html used: ..body> ..div id="Content"> This is all crude, my point is that if you want this, it can be done, and other will show you how to do it ...


1

You can use tools such as http://quirktools.com/screenfly/ or http://resolutiontester.com/ to see your website in various resolutions


1

Decrease the height of your browser window until you've got the right aspect ratio and then set your browser zoom to something less than 100%. You'll have to do the maths to work out what this would represent for non-zoomed windows.


1

Checkout this website: www.websitedimensions.com.


1

My advice is to not obsess over "optimal" resolution too much. There's always a huge variation in screen resolutions, which is ever changing. Even if iPads won't ever support Flash, you still have android tablets, netbooks, and notebooks to deal with. And if you try to cater to those with the lowest screen resolutions, you'll be de-optimizing the user ...


1

Without using any special tools, you can reduce a PNG's file size by making sure it's not interlaced. Additionally, you can use indexed colors and reduce the color palette (always use a local palette rather than a standard palette). Depending on the type of image it is, you could reduce it to 256 colors or even less without much perceptible difference (for ...


1

Design for higher browser resolutions but keep the most important area/content of your site within a smaller (for example: 760*y px) part that you can assign the highest priority regarding visibility. ("If my site loads in a 800* browser window, this is what the visitor sees first before scrolling anywhere. Secondary content lies outside this area.") Btw, ...


1

Make your site scale well. This tidbit of advice about 800x600 came from the days when designers would force sites to be 1024 when most people had 800, and couldn't view the site decently. As mentioned before, the existing trend is to re-size your browser on your screen to fit against the other windows to optimize working. My browser window is never the ...


1

Unless you have a specific reason to, I'd say NO. The majority of large sites are usually centered in a container 990px or a little smaller. This keeps it safe for anything 1024x768 or larger.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible