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7

There is no such thing as "dofollow". All links are followed unless specifically stated otherwise (nofollow).


4

What some people call a "dofollow" link is just a normal link - i.e. a link that does not have the rel="nofollow" attribute. If you use dofollow in the rel attribute of a link, it is simply ignored by search engine spiders. So, what you want is simply something like this: <a href="target.html">target</a> There is no dofollow (or similar) ...


4

Like I said (dramatically and poorly) in my comments, it is not an acceptable practice. nofollow is designed for webmasters to disavow links on their own website that they do not have editorial control over. The best example of this are blogs with links to the websites of commentors. This was a common source of spam and this allows blogs to allow the users ...


1

It might just be a matter of time until Google crawls and indexes them without rel="canonical", but the following might help: Use the Fetch as Google tool to trigger crawling for the updated URLs (follow the steps there). In your sitemap, indicate the last modification date by supplying the lastmod attribute. Also in your sitemap, specify the priority ...


1

Keep in mind that if Googlebot sees a nofollow on a link on a page, then it treats every link on the page with that same URL as nofollow. Consider this senario: You have two links on the page to myotherpage.html. The first link has the anchor text "Click Here" because it is prominent to users and usability testing shows that having action words ...


1

Using rel prev and rel next isn't going to solve the duplicate title and meta description problem. Several people on Google's blog post that it doesn't prevent these errors in Webmaster Tools. For example: cynthiacoffield said... I've had similar duplicate title tag issues that are resolved with rel prev/next canonical. I would recommend putting ...



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