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12

The rel attribute is only for a and link elements. The nofollow value is to keep a web crawler from following that link (which might have affected the linked page's ranking based on your own). It keeps spammers commenting on blog posts from gaining any page ranking from linking from the blog (or discussion forum, etc.). It doesn't make sense for img elements ...


11

It's just "commentary." In this case, whoever created that link apparently thinks the person on the other end is a douche. The rel attribute defines the relationship between the current document and the target(href) document. Consider this a more…aggressive version of the Vote Links microformat. (Just as non-standard, but was an attempt at establishing a ...


9

The only time that it is mandatory to use rel="nofollow" on a link is if the link is sponsored. If somebody paid you for the link, or if the link is part of an exchange, Google might penalize your site for NOT including a rel="nofollow" on it. You should also apply nofollow to links that are created by your users without review. Otherwise, they have ...


7

There is no such thing as "dofollow". All links are followed unless specifically stated otherwise (nofollow).


5

rel=translation has been proposed but not adopted by the W3C (it's not in the HTML5 working document). If the words on the pages are different then Google won't penalize you for duplicate content (several people say this in the Webmaster forums). There's lots of advice on multi-language sites in this blog post.


5

The rel="me" attribute for links is not give more PageRank (or link juice) to your linked webpage. It just means the link refers to your website attached to your profile.


4

Like I said (dramatically and poorly) in my comments, it is not an acceptable practice. nofollow is designed for webmasters to disavow links on their own website that they do not have editorial control over. The best example of this are blogs with links to the websites of commentors. This was a common source of spam and this allows blogs to allow the users ...


4

What some people call a "dofollow" link is just a normal link - i.e. a link that does not have the rel="nofollow" attribute. If you use dofollow in the rel attribute of a link, it is simply ignored by search engine spiders. So, what you want is simply something like this: <a href="target.html">target</a> There is no dofollow (or similar) ...


3

You cannot use rel canonical on a <div>. Google only recognizes the rel canonical meta tag in the <head> of a document. They have this policy to minimize the risk that websites have rel canonical tags added in the middle of the body due to cross site scripting (XSS) attacks. If you have a div that has content from another source, a user ...


3

rel="me" links are treated the same as any other links, with the added functionality that they tell Google that the two linking pages represent the same person. Ideally they should be reciprocal links, so you should have one on your website linking back to your profile on http://www.squidoo.com/. Something like this: John Sanjay has also written <a ...


3

The answer is you should allow links that are trusted to not have the rel no follow tag. There are a couple of reasons: Your link juice is always divided between all the links on your page including, the links with the rel no follow tag. The link juice just isn't sent to through the links to the external sites with the no follow tags. The point of rel no ...


3

According to Matt Cutts links to quality external sites is part of Google's algorithm. Not to mention, if every site did this imagine what the state of search engines would be like? Quality of search results would suffer tremendously. Be a good webmaster and help the search engines do a better job.


3

Is my juice leaking? From your last question I think that maybe your ideas might be confused regarding link juice leaking. According to my understanding of this Matt Cutts' article (that I suggest you to read): Your link juice leaks out because of any link you place on your page, even if the link uses the rel="nofollow". The only difference using ...


3

Pull up the two Google profiles in consecutive tabs. Switch to the "About" tab in both. See how yours has that "Other profiles" section at right, with a link back to scirra.com? Ashley's doesn't. The verification process looks at the Google profile page for a backlink to the claiming site. See here, second bullet under "Associate your content with your ...


3

You're using the wrong tags. You should be using rel="canonical on all of the domains that are not the primary domain. rel="alternate" does not tell search engines that a secondary domain is canonical to a primary domain.


3

The official link types as defined by the W3C specify the following for HTML 4.01: http://www.w3.org/TR/html401/types.html#type-links In HTML 5 the W3C appear to have handed off registration and management of these link types to the microformats folks. See section 4.12.4.14` Other link types: Extensions to the predefined set of link types may be ...


3

It has no meaning assigned to it in any published specification. It may have been agreed on in some community, or it may have special meaning to some software, or it may be just someone’s idea of a joke. There are various rel values around, but anything that is not listed in the Microformats Microformats Wiki existing rel values page probably isn’t worth ...


3

To inform search engines of alternate language versions of a page, you should use the <link> element with the hreflang attribute, as described in the HTML spec. <LINK title="The manual in Dutch" rel="alternate" hreflang="nl" href="http://someplace.com/manual/dutch.html"> These links go in the head so are not visible to normal users. For users ...


2

If I start to utilise Rel="prev" and rel="next" should I set page 2 onwards as index,follow or noindex,follow? Neither. Use rel="prev" etc. throughout the entire paginated series. Obviously page 1 will only have rel="next", and the last page only rel="prev". There's no need to use noindex anywhere in a series which uses pagination markup. The whole ...


2

What I tend to do is write a conditional (or do do it by hand if it's a static HTML site) so that on the home page it says: <a href="http://mysite.com">My site</a> but on all other pages it says: <a href="http://mysite.com" rel="nofollow">My site</a> That way you get the benefit of the link juice from the home page (which is ...


2

This is neither valid nor will it have any positive effect. The rel and href attributes are mainly used on a or link tags, not on div. The usage of canonical is explained in this post.


1

Our best guess is the following: 1) For pages 2, 3, and beyond we should have a canonical which preserves the query string. For example: /ca/en/my-product?reviewpage=2 will have a rel="canonical" href="/us/en/my-product?reviewpage=2" since they show the EXACT same content (in our case). 2 & 3) For page 1, we should have a canonical target that gets us ...


1

The link type author is defined in HTML5: […] the author keyword indicates that the referenced document provides further information about the author […] So you can use any kind of URI that is "about" the author. This can be a personal website, a profile on a third party website (e.g. a social network profile or a gaming network profile), a page about ...


1

As a safer approach, I would use a Google+ page (not profile) + rel="publisher" instead, it may not give the wished results (profile picture + number of +'s in search results), but could allow some other right side info to appear. You may notice that all these bloggers that appear in search results have their real name and most often their real face photo ...


1

Doesn't matter. You should just use your Google+ profile URL anyway - i.e. <link rel="author" href="https://plus.google.com/profileid"> in your site header. You could also do this in an <a> tag somewhere on the page. edit: as heytools noted however, using anything besides your real name on a Google+ profile constitutes a TOS violation. See ...


1

I think you should know the meaning and usage of rel canonical tool better. rel="canonical" is a tool to prevent duplicate content. We use it in head section of a page to tell Google that which version of pages (with similar content) is original. So there is no reason for use it in <div> tags of your HTML code.


1

Using rel prev and rel next isn't going to solve the duplicate title and meta description problem. Several people on Google's blog post that it doesn't prevent these errors in Webmaster Tools. For example: cynthiacoffield said... I've had similar duplicate title tag issues that are resolved with rel prev/next canonical. I would recommend putting ...


1

It is bad in context of Goolge's fighting with spam through "Penguin". This "Penguin" punishs for "site-wide" links. My piece of advice for you is to use rel="nofollow". It will prevent you from any filter actions but leave your link available for users.


1

http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.com/2012/03/video-about-pagination-with-relnext-and.html Try this Official Google Help to use rel="prev" and rel="next" right. In you situation you should use rel="prev" and rel="next" for your pagination.


1

You first need to edit your profile (click on "Profile" in the sidebar) so it includes the website in question in your "Contributor to" section. Then, you need to place a link on any page that you want the Google+ Authorship system to take effect that links to your Google+ profile. <a href="https://plus.google.com/[Profile ID]" rel="author">My ...



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