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0

I will suggest to go for multi servers to solve this issue , where servers are connected in clustred format . So in case server load of one goes high your traffic is diverted to second server and so on


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While a response body is not needed (and usually ignored by browsers), it is helpful for people who maintain links to know why a resource URL has been changed. If you put an explanation into the response body, then hopefully the people who linked to the original page will update their links.


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Adding a link to a target page is used traditionally within pages that use a refresh header to redirect users. This is not optimal and not the same as a traditional 301 redirect which is transparent to the user. If you provided HTML as part of the 301 redirect, it will not likely be seen. As well, for may redirects, this opportunity does not exist such as in ...


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The best approach for SEO is to replace the existing site at example.org. If any URLs have changed then you need to 301 redirect old to new in order to preserve as much rank as possible. (Although if the site was previous entirely Flash then I'm not sure what old URLs you would have?) The other domains example.com (where you developed the new site) and ...


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There are things you can do at a number of levels: Network Level Network Hardware: Install a load-balancer, with addition servers behind it. This will allow you to run your existing set-up fairly easily, but will probably cost quite a lot of money to setup in the time frame you have (depending on your hosting providers support levels) Virtual Hardware: ...


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First, it doesn't where the actual files are, 1 is 'real' the others are aliases. To the outside world they're all alike (unless someone digs up your DNS settings, but they can't do anything with that info). Then, I suggest you don't make two working domains. This would make you compete with yourself, which is kinda pointless. Choose one and stick to it. ...


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Google has a site migration howto. A protocol change counts as url modification; this is the relevant section. The switch goes much like a regular HTTPS switch. Once your urls are made protocol-relative, and before you start redirecting, you should validate the https site in Google's webmaster tools. It's a separate site with its own sitemap. There is no ...


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If you are using apache: Search your root folder for the file named "htaccess.txt" or ".htaccess". Add the following line: ErrorDocument 503 http://www.example.com/customhtml.html You have your visitors redirected to customhtml.html. You can add an iframe of your "another web address" in the HTML code.


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It seems like you're aiming for the second-worst outcome. If you're expecting a spike, you have time to do something: Implement in-code caching (can be easy, can take a while to get right) Optimise static files (jpegoptim, optipng, more-css, etc) to reduce bandwidth, speed things up for all users. Move your static stuff to a CDN to remove those requests ...


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When your website is too busy due to a large traffic, the best way of redirection is using custom error documents. So, when a user gets 503 error code, the server will redirect visitors to the custom error document page you have defined. There are different ways for different servers to customize error document pages. 1. For Apache server, add the ...


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What webserver are you running on? Nginx To remove www in nginx do the following. if ($host = 'www.example.com' ) { rewrite ^/(.*)$ http://example.com/$1 permanent; } That will strip the www. To force https: rewrite ^ https://$server_name$request_uri? permanent; Along those lines. Apache Force https: RewriteEngine On RewriteCond %{HTTPS} ...


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Any time you redirect you are telling the browser to change the URL as it appears to the user. There are three approaches you could take for this problem. Serve both domains out of the same folder. This will mean that both domains have the same (duplicate) content. This solution works when both domains are served from the same server. You just need ...


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I changed my domain redirects to add utm parameters to the URLs. This causes Google Analytics to treat the traffic as "campaign" traffic rather than direct traffic. When somebody types in my site example.org site they now get redirected to: http://example.com/?utm_campaign=domainnames&utm_medium=domain&utm_source=example.com I built this URL ...


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Google WMT feature to 'Add a site' asks users to enter a URL, and gives example 'www.example.com' - which is not helpful when trying to add an https site To add the https version of the site, just look at the URL in WMT for http version and change it from https://www.google.com/webmasters/tools/dashboard?authuser=0&siteUrl=http://www.domain.com to ...


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google change of address tools: Note: The tool does not currently support the following kinds of site moves: subdomain name changes, protocol changes (from HTTP to HTTPS)


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From the mod_rewrite documentation you need to use the NE (no escape) flag when your rewrite rule has a hash: RewriteRule #(.+)$ /? [L,R=301,NE] You commented that the NE flag may only apply to the target URL and not the rewrite pattern. If that is the case, another approach would be to escape the # sign. mod_rewrite supports \x style escape sequences. ...


1

You are right about GEOIP and GEO Location. It is hard to do and requires maintenance. Even then, according to some I am in Florida, Ohio, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, etc. One out of four ain't bad! Not something to count on. Concerning your idea about the new domain name and doing a 301 redirect. If you are thinking that the domain name is of any benefit ...


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Using DNS is not a redirect. You simply pointed another domain name to the same server. Nothing more. There is serious danger in this in that you will/can end up with duplicate content that will harm SERP performance severely. TO avoid this, traditionally, you would want to have both domains configured on a web server (it does not have to be the same ...


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I wouldn't recommend using HTML meta tags to manage redirects. Go into your root directory, find the .htaccess file and add this to the top. # This allows you to redirect your entire website to any other domain Redirect 301 / http://siteB.com/ You may have to edit your settings to view that file because most programs hide the .htaccess file by default. ...


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You should be able to configure a different virtual host for you www version of the domain using these instructions. When the certificate is handled by a separated virtual host than the www removal redirect, it should check the certificate when redirecting.


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I feel like I am misunderstanding something, but if I am actually understanding the issue, it seems like two tools would completely solve the problem. (Leave the 301s in place.) Create a robots.txt and disallow all indexing and crawling on the old site. In Webmaster Tools, click Google Index/Remove URLs. Enter the domain name of the old site. It will ask ...


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There are two techniques that you can use: Frame redirects This is a technique where the first domain serves an HTML frameset that hides the other URL. It has some disadvantages: Users may not be able to navigate out of the frameset. Clicking links may not change the URL, even if they navigate to external websites. Users may have a hard time ...


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I think this is a synchronisation problem of updating the Google databases. When you 301 redirect the home page to an article, you say to Googlebot the new home page is the article but Google takes more time to take into consideration a redirect than a title change. That's why I think Google updated your title without taking into consideration the redirect ...



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