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1

Restaurants and takeaways use local rankings which is different to normal search listings, it uses NAP (Name Address Phone Number) and many other factors to determine where your business is located and the intended local audience. So, unless you sell the same food and serve the same area its generally a bad idea. Google has wised up to people purchasing ...


2

To redirect everyone else, apart from your IP address (eg. 123.123.123.123), to the /blog subdirectory then you can use something like the following in .htaccess: RewriteEngine On RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !^/blog/ RewriteCond %{REMOTE_ADDR} !=123.123.123.123 RewriteRule (.*) /blog/$1 [R=301,L] If the requested URI does not start with /blog/ and the IP ...


1

Google has said they they want sites to move to HTTPS and they will even give a slight rankings boost to sites that do so. Your redirect rule looks like a fine way to migrate your site from HTTP to HTTPS. Some webmasters have migrated to HTTPS recently have found that that rankings have suffered as a result. There is certainly some SEO risk with the ...


1

Yes, it will. The http and https version will be seen as individual pages and thus also create duplicate content. The solution is to use a 301-permanent redirect, which your code does. This will transfer the juice to the destination of the redirection, so you're good. Also, adding a canonical tag to indicate which is the prefered url is good practice. ...


1

I think this is a good way to solve this problem. I read something similar yesterday at moz.com Q&A Section (actually i thought it was the exactly same question as here) and it says cannonicalisation quite like 301 redirects in that case. You better read that yourself.


1

Google has a PageSpeed Insights extension available for Chrome. This doesn't give all of the same functionality as the online version but will give most of the suggestions you probably need.


0

This may be a silly suggestion, but are you sure the site you are using is linux and uses a htaccess files? I recently inherited some web properties, only to realise that despite having a htaccess file, changes I was making weren't being applied as the server was Windows, and not linux.


1

Google Webmaster Tools treats HTTP and HTTPS as separate sites. When adding a site, simply type the URL including the https:// prefix. You will then have two sites in Google Webmaster Tools. This fits with the general principle that http://www.example.com is considered a different URL from https://www.example.com and may validly serve different content, ...


0

The best way to go is to create an .htaccess file with the following contents: RewriteEngine On RewriteRule ^(.*)$ http://www.example.com/$1 [L,R=301] Then copy that file to the document root of each domain. Normally a document root is right in the public_html if your web server is setup like most. Then use redbot.org and test everything by plugging in ...


2

Try: RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} !^www\.example\.com$ [NC] RewriteRule ^(.*)$ http://www.example.com/$1 [L,R=301] This should work. Here is mine: RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} ^example\.com$ [NC] RewriteRule ^(.*)$ http://www.example.com/$1 [R=301,L]


0

The following topic will answer your question. It's about URL encoding your URL's. http://stackoverflow.com/questions/22181429/how-do-i-use-web-config-to-redirect-to-a-query-string-on-windows-server-2008-r2


1

You won't be able to "redirect" using DNS records. As mentioned: You could create a CNAME record for your .net domain, this way your DNS will translate mydomain.net to mydomain.com. This is a good first step, but this only sets the domain to point to the same IP, it doesn't actually perform any redirecting. Once the domain is pointing to the same ...


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You can try http://redirect.center. In your case, configure your DNS like this: mydomain.net A 54.84.55.102 redirect.mydomain.net CNAME www.mydomain.com.redirect.center www.mydomain.net CNAME www.mydomain.redirect.center


0

I have a rewrite rule that forces my site url to be prefixed with "http://www". This is mainly for google analytics. So if someone goes to http://mywebsite.com it will redirect them to http://www.mywebsite.com. You can accomplish this in two ways: Create the rewrite in IIS if you have IIS URL Rewrite installed. Here is how it is done: Add a rewrite ...


0

The link you provided (github.com/keithgardner2/keithgardner2.github.io) works fine. However, the domain name keithgardner.me has 3 A records - 2 are github.com and 1 is NameCheap. There has to be something that NameCheap is doing incorrectly. In fact, this is likely far too complicated a set-up for what you are trying to do. I suggest logging onto your ...


0

If you are changing your URLs from .asp to .html, then you absolutely should use redirects. Your redirects should stay in place indefinitely. It is very difficult to change every last link to your pages. Even if you were able to change all the inbound links, Googlebot will still come visit your old URLs for years and years.


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Try this RewriteEngine on RewriteCond %{http_host} ^example.com [NC] RewriteRule ^(.*)$ http://www.example.com/$1 [R=301,NC] RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} /help RewriteRule . - [L] RewriteRule ^([^\]+)$ $1.html [NC,L] I added a condition to your .htaccess to check if the Requested URI contains /help ,then it will be ...


1

Turn off the cPanel redirect. Not sure what it is doing or how. But clearly it is not working right. Create an .htaccess file in your sub-domain root directory with: RewriteEngine on RewriteRule ^(.*)$ http://www.example.com/$1 [L,R=301] ...in it. Obviously change example.com to your domain name. That should do what you want. If you do not know where ...


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I wasn't convinced this would work, but I've tested it and it does seem to. Quite simply: ^.{0}$ Where: ^ is the start of the match . is any character (except newline) {0} is precisely zero times $ is the end of the match


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You can use the IIS URL Rewrite extension from Microsoft. IIS URL Rewrite 2.0 enables Web administrators to create powerful rules to implement URLs that are easier for users to remember and easier for search engines to find. By using rule templates, rewrite maps, .NET providers, and other functionality integrated into IIS Manager, Web administrators can ...


0

"Does Googlebot ever trigger the ddos protection?" No. The DDoS protection also shouldn't block search engine crawlers. "Whats the average redirect time generally?" About 5 seconds (must have JavaScript and cookies enabled to pass the check).


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There's something to be said for an aged domain, generally the older the better, so it might be worth considering consolidating to oldsite.com. That said, if the benefits of newsite.com outweigh the benefits of an aged domain I'd think it would be smart to consider migrating the content to the new site and implementing a cross-domain canonical link telling ...


1

We have gotten a few questions like this one. While I found one good answer for you, I thought I would take this opportunity answer the question better. There are actually two things to consider and not just one. When you want to retain the links of an old site you have essentially two tasks: one, to redirect from one site to the other properly; two, ...


0

This is easy to do, and the only piece of the puzzle missing is an SSL cert for olddomain.com. Forget the idea about IP addresses restricting you, this misunderstanding is the root cause of your issue. 'Domain Validated' (or DV) certificates are very inexpensive and available from multiple vendors for well under $10 USD. I have used cheapsslsecurity.com and ...


3

While it isn't impossible to host multiple secure sites on a single IP address, thanks to SNI and SAN, the redirect you're trying to do is impossible without one of the aforementioned solutions. In order to receive a redirect from https://www.olddomain.com, the browser must have already requested that URL using SSL/TLS, and is expecting an encrypted response ...



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