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0

Maybe you are misunderstanding, or they are being too specific without explaining? A possible answer to this is because WWW is not a subdomain in most cases, it is a CNAME alias on top of an A record. Other than that, it could be their "style" or something. Point to non-WWW and let the target pick up and mitigate whether it needs to be there or not. Could ...


2

You are right! It is tradition to have the www and therefore expected by many. Tradition that is many decades old should not be easily discarded. At the very least, you may not be capturing the traffic that expects the www. Normally, I would say that you need to choose one or the other, www or non-www, but both should exist with one redirecting to the ...


3

From a SEO perspective, using a subdomain, www, splits up visits to the site though you can combine the data into one number. Some companies want to forgo the www since it just takes up space in advertising and is useless in a sense. Having a www, just to have one, is pointless and, should I say, old fashioned. However, unless there is a technical reason or ...


3

If the redirects are temporal, this is fine. If the old domain should be disregarded and the new domain should be used, this is bad. As long as there's 302, the bots will periodically check the first domain and keep those in the results. If you 301 them, you tell them "forgot old url, only use new url". This last part is not happening now.


0

I see strange regex out there that appear to be more complex than necessary... for example, why use (.*) instead of just a *??? Because in regular expressions (as opposed to globbing patterns / standard wildcards) the * (asterisk) by itself does not mean anything. The * repeats the previous element 0 or more times. For example, the regex A* will match ...


1

For worldwide compatibility, the answer is no. The reason is because not everyone can read messages very quickly, and depending on the contents of your error page, it might take someone with poor eyesight at least a few good minutes to read everything on it. Also, there's a chance that the person using the site has a poor understanding of the language the ...


1

If you do it after something like 10 seconds or more, it should be fine. It would imply that the user was not already there and just get confused but actually (as many do) opened the search result in a new tab and took them in turn until they got to yours. So a 404 page will get them to close it right away, while a redirect may give them something more ...


4

It isn't necessarily bad for SEO. You want to be careful of "sneaky redirects" (see https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/2721217?hl=en), but this type of behavior should probably fall in acceptable territory. Honestly, from an SEO perspective, you'd be better off redirecting the broken URL to a legit page on your site via a 301 server side redirect. ...


0

First of all what @w3d suggested is also a good solution I have done it in another way. On the backup server I have added some url rewriting in the IIS in order to redirect all pages, except the maintenance page, using a 302 redirect to that maintenance page. Rewrite rule <rewrite> <rules> <rule name="Maintenance" ...


0

The solution now working and tested - in the LocalSettings.php file, shared in case anyone else has trouble with this: $wgScriptPath = "/mediawiki"; $wgScriptExtension = ".php"; $wgArticlePath = "/mediawiki/$1"; $wgUsePathInfo = true; $wgServer = "http://intranet.example.com"; The problem was caused by a forward slash on the end of ...


1

How can I still throw the 503 server error on the new server Using whatever server-side scripting language you are using. For example, in PHP this would be something like: header('HTTP/1.1 503 Service Unavailable',true,503); Note that if you are serving a (temporary) 503 then it is advisable to also send a Retry-After header with the time the service ...


0

You only need RewriteEngine On once at the top of your .htaccess file. Always have external redirects before internal rewrites. So, in order to redirect from the "ugly" (/powers/power.php?power=red) URL to the "pretty" (/powers/red) URL (in order to satisfy search engines and anyone who has linked to your site), you could do something like this: # ...


1

www. is an automatic alias. (See http://www.chickenaday.appspot.com/ vs http://chickenaday.appspot.com/). Why force the user? If you do want to redirect, you could try this untested snippet of slightly modified code from http://stackoverflow.com/a/10964868/3164117: from urlparse import urlparse, urlunparse @app.before_request def redirect_nonwww(): ...


2

The easiest ways to do a redirect in order from the old-fashioned method to the best method is as follows: Code snippet 1 saved as index.html in the document root of the old URL. <html> <head> <title>Redirecting</title> <meta http-equiv="refresh" content="1;URL=http://store.xyz.com"> </head> <body> ...


-2

For the sake of SEO, and maintaining your pages' rank, you may want to permanently redirect the old URLs to the new ones. Here's the Google documentation on redirects.


7

You most certainly do not have to buy store.xyz.com as a new domain name. store.xyz.com is a part of xyz.com A domain name is made up of multiple parts www.google.com www.google.com | | | --- domain name extension | | --- domain name | --- subdomain mail.google.com mail.google.com | | | --- domain name extension | | --- ...


1

You are half way there. I would suggest that any page that does not exist should error out. I have a "removed" page that issues a 404 and any page that is deleted would 301 redirect any deleted page to the "removed" page. But in the end, I found that it was far better if the page I deleted would 404 without the 301. I changed this a bit, and please know ...


0

... however they lose the page that they were going to. I'm not sure what you mean by this - they shouldn't "lose" anything? However, the URL in the address bar will not be updated - if that is what you are implying? An Apache Alias converts a URL to a server-side filesystem path (usually to allow access to files located outside of the document root) - ...



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