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12

If your website is down for a month, you will lose all your rankings and it may take you months to gain them back. I had a website go offline for about 3 months due to an issue with hosting. When I got it back online, it took nearly a full year to get back the rankings that it had once enjoyed. The best idea I have to mitigate the damage would be to use ...


10

If the root (/) 301 redirect to /en/, Google will most probably consider your homepage is http://www.example.com/en/ and there is no problem not to have a root (/) page. Regarding Google guidelines for multilingual sites, you can use this method to separate languages on your site.


8

For your first two rewrites (non-www → www, http → https), the following rule should work: RewriteEngine On RewriteCond %{HTTPS} off [OR] RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} !=www.example.com [NC] RewriteRule ^(.*) https://www.example.com/$1 [NS,L,R=permanent] Just replace www.example.com with the actual canonical hostname of your site. As for your third ...


5

I wouldn't count on all spiders being able to follow a redirect to get to a robots.txt file. See: Does Google respect a redirect header for robots.txt to a different file name? Assuming you are hosted on an Apache server, you could use mod_rewrite from your .htaccess file to to serve the correct file for the correct domain: RewriteEngine On RewriteCond ...


5

Use a 302 redirect instead 301 302 Redirect Means: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HTTP_302 - "The HTTP/1.0 specification (RFC 1945) defines this code, and gives it the description phrase "Moved Temporarily"." However that doesn't mean you'll be able to keep your search engine placement. It just specifies that the content is moving for a set amount of time ...


5

Although the browser should cache permanent redirects, I think an internal rewrite would be preferable. This avoids the browser having to make an additional HTTP request: RewriteEngine On RewriteRule ^([a-z]+\.css)$ /css/$1 [L]


4

If you can, it's a better idea to put the redirects from the old urls to their new equivalent. For any other pages that have no new equivalent or are being discarded, you can either leave those to be 404, or redirect those to the home page. It's also a good idea to have a custom 404 page for the new version of the site that contains a simplified site map, ...


4

You're almost there. Drop the very first RewriteCond (as it's not required and won't match ever) and add a trailing / to your last RewriteRule since you're redirecting with them. RewriteEngine On RewriteCond %{HTTP:Accept-Language} ^en [NC] RewriteRule ^$ http://mysite.com/en/ [L,R=301] RewriteCond %{HTTP:Accept-Language} ^de [NC] RewriteRule ^$ ...


4

If it truly is a redirect of a new domain (and I say this because a lot of companies get this wrong) then there will only be the root domain indexed in search engines anyhow so when the new website goes live and the redirect removed, it won't take a search engine long to see that and then start indexing the new site on the new domain. There is minimal ...


4

You can use Google Analytics URL builder to construct your URL's in emails and then view visits to your website via these URL's in the 'Campaigns' section of Google Analytics and drill down, segment, create custom reports as you see fit.


4

No, you do not need a separate registration. http:// or https:// are just protocol specifiers. The name will resolve to the same host. However, once you're on the hosted machine, the web server determines what to display. Often, HTTP (port 80) and HTTPS (port 443) can be routed to different pages. This should be configurable by the website admin/tools. In ...


4

Do a 301 redirect from the parked domain to the new domain. That will tell the search engines that the existing domain is the main one and will eliminate potential duplicate content issues. It will also be less confusing for your users as they will see a consistent domain when accessing your site. If you are using Apache you can do this easily with a ...


4

The redirect is the better solution, as it stops the erroneous URLs ever being linked to or shared, and so should help crawl efficiency (i.e., search engines shouldn't have to crawl multiple non-canonical versions of pages, thereby wasting time that could be spent elsewhere on your site). I'd do your redirects on the server though, if possible. A fairly ...


4

You could just redirect /styles.css to /css/styles.css. In the .htaccess in the web root: RedirectMatch permanent /([a-z]+\.css)$ http://example.com/css/$1 (Replacing example.com with your real domain name.)


4

There are no SEO issues with this. When you think about it there is no standard home page URL. No only do different web servers have different default (index.html, default.html, etc) but it's not uncommon for home pages to be in subdirectories (example.com/site/something/home). Search engines are not going to have any difficulty recognizing it as your ...


3

Yes, change them to the new URLs. Although the 301 redirects tell the search engines where to find moved pages you shouldn't be feeding them inaccurate information about your web pages. Besides possibly being error prone, it may also be an indicator of quality. While this may not affect your rankings, it may possibly affect crawl rate and other related ...


3

I guess a 301 redirect is certainly not an option since the whole site structure will be different. But if you are coming from Joomla to WordPress, the site structure will be predictably different and thus 301 redirects are both feasible and desired. As you can see in this other question, it doesn't have to be all that complicated of a rule to ...


3

But we do not want to harm our existing SEO while we are doing this. What you might be concerned here with is Cloaking - that is, serving different content to a user's browser than to search engine robots. Providing that you use IP delivery, which is using the requestor's location to deliver content specifically written for that country, versus ...


3

I think you're reasonably close. However, & (ampersands) are not HTML encoded in the request, so you should check just for & and not &. Special HTML characters should only be HTML encoded in your source HTML document. I think the few omitted spaces (argument delimiters) are perhaps just due to the copy/paste of your code? Try this (in ...


3

I would advise to keep a MySQL table that saves the mapping of the file id, to the directory it is kept in. You shouldn't be worried about the DB load considering 1.5M rows and millions of queries per day. For such a simple 1:1 link query. Just make sure you add the proper index to the key you search according to, and if you wish to be better prepared for ...


3

Finally resolved using these rewrite rules: RewriteEngine on RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} ^www.unwanteddomain.com$ [NC] RewriteRule .* http://whateverPlaceYouWantToSend.com [R,L] HTTP_REFERER did not work so I used HTTP_HOST.


3

From an SEO point of view, no, it's not a problem for your page to have no root. Search engine's index URLs, it doesn't matter if they're in subfolders or not. However, from a user-experience point of view you really shouldn't assume that anybody who lands on the root of your site wants to see the English version. Let's say a Japanese user tells one of ...


3

Using change address in Google webmasters should reflect this. Also have you submitted the new sitemap XML from the new domain. Lastly I would try doing a Fetch as Google from the new domain. Full details present here https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/83105?hl=en


3

While this should work, it has a few potential drawbacks: Every crawler has to do two HTTP requests: one to discover the redirect, and another one to actually fetch the file. Some crawlers might not handle the 301 response for robots.txt correctly; there's nothing in the original robots.txt specification that says anything about redirects, so presumably ...


3

I do not believe so. Not using ErrorDocument the way you have specified. Here is a resource site that seems to have some answers. http://www.askapache.com/htaccess/htaccess.html#Custom_ErrorDocuments Scroll down and you will find this example. If it is not exactly what you want, it can be modified. ### ALTERNATATIVE TO USING ERRORDOCUMENT # ...


3

You do not need a custom error document in order to monitor 404's on your site - if that is the requirement. All the information is in your server access log. The HTTP response code (ie. 404, 403, 200, etc) and the URL of the request that produced that response. The custom error document is a nice way of serving a meaningful response to users. You can also ...


3

First find out if their url shortening service uses 301 redirects, if they don't, use another service. If you stay with them, add GA tracking parameters to your urls. You could create some "fancy" parameters values that perfectly identify visits that are coming through their service. After adding parameters sent them your urls. With those parameters in place ...


2

It won't do you any good SEO-wise. Search engines are smart enough to follow the redirect so they'll give the final landing page the credit for the link. Even if point #1 we not true, it would be silly to give a redirect page so much link juice and/or any other SEO value. Do you really want that page to rank well? Is that what you want your visitors to ...


2

Search engines respect 301 redirect and it is the most search engine friendly thing you can do in this case. It will tell them the content has moved, to stop indexing the old URL, start indexing the new URL and associate all of the links the old URL had with the new URL. That last part is key as those links hold a lot of SEO value and by not doing the 301 ...


2

To isolate the problem, first try it without the redirect. If it still doesn't work, then make sure that the httpd user (e.g. nobody) has read access to the GeoIP database files, as covered in the Troubleshooting section here. Also make sure that each line in your .htaccess file or main server config ends in a newline, and remove the spacing before ...



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