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3

The best way to do this is with a rel canonical link tag in the head of each of your pages. So the home page of both your main site and your bet site would have this: <link rel="canonical" href="http://example.com/" /> And foo.html on each would have this: <link rel="canonical" href="http://example.com/foo.html" /> That way Google knows ...


3

Never treat Googlebot any different than actual site visitors You should never treat Google bot any different from actual users. Redirecting Googlebot using user agent or other similar tactics and not users will likely harm your site as its against Google's guideline rules. Cosmetic changes say hello to canonical links If the beta site has the same ...


3

It is very hard to get local directory sites ranked in search engines these days regardless of whether or not the content is temporary. See this parody letter purportedly from Google, but really written by somebody unhappy that Google is not including directories in the search engine often. As for your temporary premium listings, I wouldn't change the URL ...


3

It is very common practice to redirect to error pages when putting in a large class of redirects. In addition to wholesale HTTP to HTTPS redirects, this often happens when: You redirect from naked domain to www (or the other way around) You redirect from one domain name to another You redirect an entire directory Redirecting to a 404 page may not be ...


2

If possible, try to use only one 301 redirection. 301 redirects transfer SEO juice, but you lose a part of it for every one of them (around 10-15%). You should make a rule to redirect specific cases first, like: example.it/index.php?id=10&link=slug (301 redirect to) -> example.eu/c10/slug... Then, if none of these rules are triggered, you should apply ...


2

I can't think of any particular way that redirecting your home page to an article would hurt your rankings in search engines. If you might want to change the redirect in the future, consider using a 302 redirect rather than a 301 redirect. 301 redirects are kept in browser cache. Once a person visits your home page and gets a permanent redirect, they ...


2

In your server config, you can modify your current example to include the /abc/ directory to restrict redirects to that one directory: RewriteRule ^/abc/(.*)/(\?.*)?$ /abc/$1$2 [R=301,L] I've removed the backslash escape from the slash, in your example, as this would appear to be unnecessary. Note that to make this work in .htaccess you would need to ...


2

You asked quite a few questions and I suspect you know most of the answers already. So to clear up some confusion, I will address the subject of changing the domain name since this sounds like the new question. If you need more, please let us know. Keywords in domain names mean almost nothing anymore and exact matches rarely happen as a result. That was a ...


1

Don't duplicate the site. As recommended by Google, you should use a 301 redirect. https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/93633?hl=en Page content added for completeness for future visitors: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r1lVPrYoBkA If you need to change the URL of a page as it is shown in search engine results, we recommend that you use a ...


1

When Googbot visits the site with the frame, all it will see is a frameset in the source code usually implemented something like this: <frameset rows="100%,*" border="0"> <frame src="http://othersite.example.com/" noresize frameborder="0"> </frameset> This will point Googlebot the place where you content is actually hosted. Googlebot ...


1

It is not exactly the answer to your question but you should think twice about removing trailing slashes for directories. The doc about DirectorySlash warns from potential problems (a mess with relative urls and others). And you can save some headaches by only redirecting with a 301 /dir/index.html to /dir/ (nearly your point 3), and using DirectoryIndex ...


1

Aren't your last two entries cancelling each other out? # Redirect /foo to /foo/index.html then the other way # Redirect /foo/index.html to /foo If it just for those individual files? Then I'd try: # 301 Redirect /foo/index.html to /foo RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} ^$ RewriteRule ^foo/index\.html$ /foo? [R=301,NE,NC,L] # 301 Redirect /foo/ to /foo ...


1

If you wish to speed up the redirect, instead of using DreamHost for your DNS services and adding a site redirect in DreamHost, you might manage your DNS through your domain name registrar (Aust Domains), whose services if you're lucky may use anycast DNS and perform much faster. You would then setup the HTTP redirect in their control panel. Pricing for ...


1

In an .htaccess file you could specify the following: RewriteEngine on RewriteRule ^(.*)$ http://www.example.eu/$1 [R=301,L]


1

It should just work fine provided that the URL is enclosed in double-quotations, for example: Old URL: http://www.example.com/folder%20name/page%20name.html New URL: `http://www.example.com/folder/page Redirect 301 "/folder/page%20name.html" http://www.example.com/folder/page


1

Yes, we used to filter visitors from Nigeria by .htaccess: RewriteEngine On RewriteCond %{ENV:IP2LOCATION_COUNTRY_SHORT} ^NG$ RewriteRule ^(.*)$ http://www.google.com [L] You can generate your own at http://ip2location.com/free/visitor-redirection .



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