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3

If you take all the right steps, there isn't a lot to worry about. 301 all existing pages (This is the major step!) Set all you canonical tags right (This is your 2nd most important step) You will lose a little PageRank for the redirect, but we're talking minimal amount here, nothing a little time won't fix. Just read up on how to migrate sites (which ...


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The HTTP status code 301 is named "Moved Permanently": The requested resource has been assigned a new permanent URI and any future references to this resource SHOULD use one of the returned URIs. So the resource (i.e., your document) would stay the same, it just gets a new URI. As your front page http://example.com/ is (usually) not the same resource ...


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The first parameter of RedirectPermanent should be a path, not a full URL (e.g. RedirectPermanent /foo http://example.com/bar), so you won't quite be able to get what you're trying to do to work. You should be able to do it if you split the www part into a separate vhost: <VirtualHost *:80> DocumentRoot /var/www/example ServerName example.com ...


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To redirect everyone else, apart from your IP address (eg. 123.123.123.123), to the /blog subdirectory then you can use something like the following in .htaccess: RewriteEngine On RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} !^/blog/ RewriteCond %{REMOTE_ADDR} !=123.123.123.123 RewriteRule (.*) /blog/$1 [R=301,L] If the requested URI does not start with /blog/ and the IP ...


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I would think this would be the expected behaviour would be this instead: www.example.com -> example.com www.example.com/test.html -> example.com/test.html That's a good idea. Just map the last parts of the URL (particularly folder and file) from the old domain to the new domain. You can easily use mod-rewrite if you have apache. Just make an ...


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Try: RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} !^www\.example\.com$ [NC] RewriteRule ^(.*)$ http://www.example.com/$1 [L,R=301] This should work. Here is mine: RewriteCond %{HTTP_HOST} ^example\.com$ [NC] RewriteRule ^(.*)$ http://www.example.com/$1 [R=301,L]


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If you are moving your site from http to https, you would need to submite the https site as a new site. I was advised that I need not do it and over a period of time I saw that the stats were not reliable - the index status, crawl errors etc. Suddently, I saw a big drop in the indexed pages as well. But the actual site traffic was not affected in any way; ...


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Google Webmaster Tools treats HTTP and HTTPS as separate sites. When adding a site, simply type the URL including the https:// prefix. You will then have two sites in Google Webmaster Tools. This fits with the general principle that http://www.example.com is considered a different URL from https://www.example.com and may validly serve different content, ...


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Google will be happy with either link, but it will likely show the resulting link in the search engine results so users don't have to be transferred to a redirect when clicking on a result. In your case, if you want mysite.com to appear in the results pages instead of mysite.com/blog to appear, then you need to have mysite.com point to content instead of a ...


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Doing a 301 redirect, you should be fine. I would not try and redirect each image by name, but rather make sure that each new image has the same name, just another file extension. This should make redirecting a simple regex operation. Having said that, I suggest using http://www.smalleranimals.com/thumb.htm especially since you have 10k images. Here are ...


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You don't need to contact anybody. If you setup 301 redirects in your .htaccess file to the new pages correctly there will be no issues with duplicate content.


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If you break these 301's, you will lose all value for any link you break. You may not care of course. But then again, you might. Many bots work from databases that are shared, sold, passed around. As well, many are following existing links to your site. Also consider that there are a ton of scrapers from domain monetizers that will continue no matter what ...


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I'm always setup 301 redirect from www.example.com domain to example.com. This code helps you: server { server_name www.example.com; return 301 $scheme://example.com$request_uri; }


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One way that comes to my mind would involve using PHP: $_SERVER['HTTP_REFERER'] You could check for the refering URL and implement a redirect accordingly: if($_SERVER['HTTP_REFERER']=="http://www.example.com/") { my_redirection_fuction(); } This is however a rather unreliable method since people can hide the refering url through browser privacy ...


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I would guess you purchase a static single domain certificate which only covers the domain name and not subdomain. Sadly, www. is a sub by certificate standards. If that is the case I see 3 moves you could make. 1. Purchase another certificate for the www. that you never plan on using and make a redirect. (Waste of cash, forget I even mentioned it. ...


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Restaurants and takeaways use local rankings which is different to normal search listings, it uses NAP (Name Address Phone Number) and many other factors to determine where your business is located and the intended local audience. So, unless you sell the same food and serve the same area its generally a bad idea. Google has wised up to people purchasing ...


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Google has said they they want sites to move to HTTPS and they will even give a slight rankings boost to sites that do so. Your redirect rule looks like a fine way to migrate your site from HTTP to HTTPS. Some webmasters have migrated to HTTPS recently have found that that rankings have suffered as a result. There is certainly some SEO risk with the ...


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Yes, it will. The http and https version will be seen as individual pages and thus also create duplicate content. The solution is to use a 301-permanent redirect, which your code does. This will transfer the juice to the destination of the redirection, so you're good. Also, adding a canonical tag to indicate which is the prefered url is good practice. ...


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I think this is a good way to solve this problem. I read something similar yesterday at moz.com Q&A Section (actually i thought it was the exactly same question as here) and it says cannonicalisation quite like 301 redirects in that case. You better read that yourself.


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My co-worker that took this over was able to come up with a solution that worked for us on this one. Just figured I'd post to close the loop on this one so if anyone else runs into a similar issue, it might help them out as well. He wrote an ISAPI ReWrite/ReDirect rule using the ISAPI ReWrite Manager for ISS that looks like this: RewriteEngine on ...


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Google has a PageSpeed Insights extension available for Chrome. This doesn't give all of the same functionality as the online version but will give most of the suggestions you probably need.



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