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22

You can't redirect your old sites without losing 90% of their value and risking a penalty on your new site. There usually isn't a huge cost to leaving old sites up and running. You could use them to advertise your new site. Put a banner about your new site on every page of your old sites.


11

First, something that's implied in other answers, but should probably be spelled out: the situation you describe is something Google actively wants to discourage -- you're not "collateral damage" in their fight against spammers, you are their intended target in their fight against irrelevant and 'deceptive' results. ('Deceptive' in the sense that you think ...


5

Bad Idea! Never, I repeat NEVER do that. I tried that 3 days ago and after couple of days the site to which I redirected completely lost all its rankings. Not even it was ranking on searching domain.com in Google. All indexed pages are still there but the site lost its ranking completely. I can provide the links of the sites as proof but that's not allowed ...


4

One thing that all your sites have in common is you. Why not throw a designed by link at the bottom of your site that links to your "portfolio" where your new business is prominently displayed.


4

301 Redirects are completely fine if they're real. If you had an old site and then decided to move/combine it with some other related site, there's absolutely no problem putting up a 301 redirect on the old site to send users to the new site. You should not be penalized for this in Google and if you are, they're completely reasonable about fixing it if you ...


4

The best thing to do is not worry about the traffic to your old sites. I had a good friend who graduated from Harvard Business. He told stories about how Harvard drummed into his head the mantra of "Know when to cut your losses." every day one way or another. From a business perspective, this is excellent advice! It is good advice in life too!! You are ...


4

If you never intended to have such urls in your site and they truly mean nothing for you, then it's better to keep serving them as a 404 - a page that is not found - not existing in the site. Use redirects if you used to have a page with important content, indexed and present in SERPs, that brings a lot of traffic to your site. In the 404 section of ...


3

The way Google looks at this is whether the links you've added add up to the quality of the pages. It's a myth that linking out hurts, on the contrary, linking out to relevant authority sites helps improve your topical authority. Google sees this as an attempt to provide a better user experience. However, if you have 10 links or a hundred links going out ...


2

From past experience I think you may find that the issue will be memory related and not precisely related to the rewrite rules per-say. What I have found in the past, although I can't find it documented anywhere is that IIS heavily depends on the system memory to perform URL rewriting, I believe it has something to do with caching the rules. If this is the ...


2

Yes, sort of. Put yourself in the visitors shoes (with google at their back) and ask how you can introduce your new content to them in a relevant way. ie old site is about say hiking and new one is about music recording services add content to the hiking site aimed at say hikers who like to bring their guitars along on hikes to play encouraging them to ...


1

What you are referring to is a "front controller". The usual first step is to make sure that the resource being requested is not a physical file on the filesystem before rewriting to your front controller (ie. your Perl script). For example, using mod_rewrite in your root .htaccess file: RewriteEngine On RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f RewriteCond %{...


1

Yes, it is possible and it is a well known process often called as setting up your preferred (canonical) destination. You should use 301 redirects to send traffic from the non-www URLs to the www URLs. It is a good practice also if use Search Console to set your preferred domain. To implement a 301 redirect for websites that are hosted on servers ...


1

I suggest you add [R=301,L] after your RewriteRule in your .htaccess to redirect the visitor, like so: RewriteRule (.*) https://%{HTTP_HOST}%{REQUEST_URI} [R=301,L] Currently your telling the browser "There is a https version I want you to visit". The R=301 adds "I want you to go there via a 301 reload". It's the reload part you don't have in place ...


1

Google Search Console (Link to your site report) is not up to date and has not enough accuracy. So you should not count it.There are many backlinks that Google not display in "Link to your site" segment and there are many removed links that you can still see in "Link to your site" segment. You can use other services such as Ahrefs and... to collect more ...


1

The problem with automatic redirection based on the user's language is that it could prevent users and search engines from viewing all the versions of your site. The best approach is to cross link each language version of a page, so the user can reach the desired language with a language selector easily, and search engines won't get confused (besides many ...


1

The easiest way to do this isn't with rewrite rules but with the redirect directive. Simply use Redirect 301 /oldfile.htm http://example.net/newfile.htm in your .htaccess file to redirect a single file from the current site to a file on another domain.



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