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15

The Better Business Bureau Online has a Sample Privacy Notice which is as good as any in terms of a simple, but thorough policy. It has these sections: Our Commitment To Privacy The Information We Collect How We Use Information Our Commitment To Data Security Our Commitment To Children's Privacy How To Access Or Correct Your Information How To Contact Us ...


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If you are applying for a merchant account this is a common requirement of the merchant account provider as this helps them to understand your business model and determine the risk they will be exposed to (e.g. chargebacks). Basically, the more customer friendly they are the less risk they are exposed to. Privacy policies are good to have as some users, ...


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Depending on the country/state you're sire is available in or services you are providing these may be required by law there. California requires a specific privacy policy term that most websites break off as it's own additional policy for CA residents. If you're gathering any data on your users without informing them you are there is the potential for them ...


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The excellent resouce artlung provided to the BBB website link is now moved. This was the closest thing I could find: http://www.bbb.org/us/WWWRoot/SitePage.aspx?site=70&id=a17891ea-ce8e-48d7-a27a-e6d2e5833cea Linked within is a set of tips on how to create your privacy policy: http://www.bbbonline.org/UnderstandingPrivacy/PMRC/createpolicy.asp Here ...


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You're subject to the laws of the Country where your business is legally based and/or bases the operations. Cross-country legal enforcement (privacy in particular) lives in a grey area and - for example - big companies like Facebook or Google do not always comply with EU privacy laws. For EU companies, servers' location only matters in case you move the data ...


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You didn't mention if you gonna have English visitors too or not, but these legal information is meant to be accessible for your visitors, what is point of having it on your website if your users can't understand it?! Your website should provide the necessary legal information for all targeted visitors. Since all mentioned targets are EU members, your ...


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This is just my opinion but I would say any site that allows visitors to interact should have a privacy policy and terms of use page. There are really 3 kinds of sites that go from least to most well documented in my mind. Sites that allow visitor interaction like posting comments without an account Sites that allow visitors to create accounts and ...


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In some cases, like for example Affiliate Marketing, it is required by law in the USA to disclose such information on your website. As this article on the Washington Post explains.


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Google just changed its privacy policies (so there might still be inconsistencies). here's an email I received from google a few days ago: Dear Google user, We're getting rid of over 60 different privacy policies across Google and replacing them with one that's a lot shorter and easier to read. Our new policy covers multiple products and features, ...


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If your site is handling personal data, it must (i.e. its practices for handling personal data must) comply with EU data protection laws (see the EU Data Protection Directive 95/46/EC for the definition of personal data). However, there is nowhere in the European Union a requirement for a website to have its privacy policy posted - except for "cookies". The ...


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If you use Adsense ads on your site, you are required by Google to have a privacy policy per the Adsense terms of service. From http://support.google.com/adsense/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=48182: AdSense publishers must have and abide by a privacy policy that discloses that third parties may be placing and reading cookies on your users' browsers, or ...


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The question is if you're storing any information from users or not? I think if you're using FB you don't need to make users accept anything, but, generally when someone uses a site, they're agreeing to their terms, even if they don't accept anything literally. So IMO you should be fine as long as your privacy policy is accessible easily for all users.


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The laws and acts that governs data protection and emailing various from country to country, while a lot of them change from country to country most say among the same thing and you will need to learn the key points of these and its far to many to list but for example. Not keeping peoples data on file for more than 2 years, you are responsible for safe ...


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In the U.S.? Nothing. Sorta. A privacy policy is a good idea and helps trust organizations such as eTrust evaluate your site for trust. It also helps the site user. I always read the privacy policy when any account or PII (personally identifiable information) is taken. The exception is where a site engages in marketing and serving to children 13 and under. ...


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I'm the founder of a service for generating privacy policies, which happens to be based in Italy, so I know very well Italian laws on the topic. In your case and according to Italian laws, the Data Controller - Titolare del Trattamento in Italian - must be mentioned in the privacy policy (or by any other means of informing the data subject/user about its ...


1

On the one hand, Google probably doesn't want to index these pages on your site. Most of the words in these pages aren't going to be relevant to the rest of your site. If somebody searches for these words, your site will not make a great landing page. On the other hand, so many sites have these types of pages, that it isn't going to cause a problem for ...


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"Does my website have to publish a privacy policy?" What Gisle Hannemyr's comment states might be misleading. Technically speaking you need to inform your users, but the standard way to do so is by having a privacy policy posted on your website. As further addition, consider that the California Online Privacy Protection Act (in practice reflecting on any ...


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That depends on the country you live in. The country the server is in which hosts your site. If your country doesn't have strict privacy policy laws you don't need them. It's your server and anyone accessing it does at their own risk that you being the owner can do whatever you want with the data. The EFF has a good article on how bloggers (forums) are safe ...


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You should have a general disclaimer stating you can not be held responsible for the actual site/server. You build the site to specifications. If the person paying you doesn't specify certain items, you're really not on the hook. You can recommend certain things, but as a developer, no. As long as you're not in a continued relationship with them. For the ...


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I find this resource from the Information Commissioners Office useful for wording these sort of things: http://www.ico.gov.uk/for_organisations/data_protection/topic_guides/privacy_notices.aspx You may find the small business checklist useful: http://www.ico.gov.uk/for_organisations/data_protection/topic_guides/online.aspx For the whole subject of Data ...


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1) Clearly state in your privacy policy that you collect personal data from their account and social networks and may sell this information to third parties. Write this in plain english. 2) Clearly state in your TOS that by using your website that the user allows you to access and sell their personal information. Those two steps should cover your butt ...


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I've no idea what country you're in, so here's some that cover the major countries: http://www.lawlive.com.au/legal-website-privacy-policy/ http://www.lawlive.co.uk/legal-website-privacy-policy/ http://www.lawlive.com.hk/legal-website-privacy-policy/ http://www.lawlive.co.nz/legal-website-privacy-policy/ ...


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If you are not using the domain (email, website, etc.) then you could just remove the DNS records for the domain. The WhoisPrivacy only hides the information on who owns and administers the domain. That is all a whois record shows. A private domain, in your case godaddy domains by proxy, is where the information is defaulted to godaddy. Only law ...


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ToS (Terms of Service, Terms of Used), Privacy Policy of web sites and on-line services are nothing more than unilateral declarations, i.e. help that does not have any juridical force. To be legally enforceable, they should have been formalized as 2-sided contracts. Even in this case, of contract formalization between sides, any contract is made null ...


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If you're storing any information about user activity data (including but not limited to: identity information, email addresses, user-agent strings, IP address information, dates and times of user activity, cookies and user preferences, and much much more), you need to consider having a privacy policy. Have a look at the sample privacy policies from this ...


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If you have a legal team (but you don't, or you wouldn't be asking) check with them. I have honestly just taken and modified the terms from sites that are similar to mine. While I don't know of any automated tools, I don't think the TOS on a site varies much from one to the other unless you have some pretty unique public content. When we were deploying ...



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