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0

For anyone who may find this thread, as I did having the exact same issue, I realised that my problematic php files are actually theme options outputs. I have a very similar graph on pingdom as the one above. It's unclear if these php files (which for me contain custom CSS or js settings) are dynamically checked -- or even written -- every time the theme ...


4

Because, in your example, web server would always send CSS and images regardless if the client already has them, thus greatly wasting bandwidth (and thus making the connection slower, instead of faster by reducing latency, which was presumably your intention). Note that CSS, javascript and image files are usually sent with very long expire times for exactly ...


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Your web browser doesn't know about the additional resources until it downloads the web page (HTML) from the server, which contains the links to those resources. You might be wondering, why doesn't the server just parse its own HTML and send all the additional resources to the web browser during the initial request for the web page? It's because the ...


0

Since this is an AJAX application anyway, write the data into the pages separately from your escaped fragments. Users would generate two AJAX requests: GET /fragment?id=12345 that would contain the text and HTML for the screen with a placeholder for the data GET /data?id=12345 that would be the actual data to write into the screen (maybe the data would ...


0

In my opinion, you shouldn’t serve different content for users and search engines; it’s called cloaking and as you most probably know, it’s a bad SEO practice. And even if you don’t want to manipulate search engines results, I think Google bots couldn’t make any difference; as you know, they’re only bots. When you say search engines wouldn’t care about fake ...


3

Because it doesn't assume that these things are actually required. The protocol doesn't define any special handling for any particular type of file or user-agent. It does not know the difference between, say, an HTML file and a PNG image. In order to do what you're asking, the Web server would have to identify the file type, parse it out to figure out what ...


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HTTP2 is based on SPDY and does exactly what you suggest: At a high level, HTTP/2: is binary, instead of textual is fully multiplexed, instead of ordered and blocking can therefore use one connection for parallelism uses header compression to reduce overhead allows servers to “push” responses proactively into client caches More is ...


50

The short answer is "Because HTTP wasn't designed for it". Tim Berners-Lee did not design an efficient and extensible network protocol. His one design goal was simplicity. (The professor of my networking class in college said that he should have left the job to the professionals.) The problem that you outline is just one of the many problems with the ...


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Because they do not know what those resources are. The assets a web page requires are coded into the HTML. Only after a parser determines what those assets are can the y be requested by the user-agent. Additionally, once those assets are known, they need to be served individually so the proper headers (i.e. content-type) can be served so the user-agent ...


5

Page speed is a ranking factor to some degree, as mentioned by Matt Cutts in this related video (Aug 2013): Is page speed a more important factor for mobile sites?. However, pages are also ranked on their own merits. So that one page may not (should not) bring down the ranking of the other (fast) pages on your site (if that is what you are implying). But ...


1

I have found that you get the best performance by using a combination. I tend to use: A core combined JavaScript file that contains a concatenation of all the JavaScript that is required for every page on the site. In my case this includes jQuery as well as code for lightboxes and menus. Served as a separate file so that it is cached between page ...


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CSS files linked from HTML documents are added to the parallel download queue as the HTML is parsed; the key thing is that non-asynchronous JavaScript links block the HTML parser, preventing later tags from being added to the download queue until that JavaScript is downloaded, parsed and executed.[1] Here's an example that forces the browser to download ...



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