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13

If it is always from the same IP address then blocking it is a good idea. If it is a region you don't do business in then blocking the IP range may not be a bad idea, either. An alternative approach is to identify when that user is on your site and give them bad information. Randomly tell them when credit cards are good or bad without actually attempting ...


10

Here's my take on the issue, although I don't have any firm evidence. I don't think there is actually mistrust with PayPal, but instead confusion as to how PayPal works. Most people don't want to give their credit card number to a company for them to store (although they don't realize this is partially what you're doing with any other company). People may ...


7

You have to use "IPN", it's a paypal service that send info about activation/deactivation to a URL on your site and is well documented at https://www.paypal.com/ipn


7

Paypal adaptive payments allows this


7

Charge them real money for each account.


6

You're going to get abandoned shopping carts nomatter what you do, but the best option is generally the one that fully integrates into your webpage. You can still use PayPal's API with a roll-your-own (no experience with Amazon and Google as they don't offer services in my part of the world), so you can have the best of both worlds. I doubt there's been ...


6

PayPal Payments Standard allows users to pay by card even if they don't have a PayPal account. PayPal Express Checkout requires that users have a PayPal account or create one in order to check out. Both services are detailed on PayPal's merchant page. You should use PayPal Express Checkout if: You already process regular card payments with a form on your ...


6

You could report it to Paypal, let them do their job and investigate these transactions and take appropriate steps upstream to make sure the transactions are declined at payment provider level. This not only fixes it for you, but all sites using the same payment service, and if its serious enough, they will pass it further up the line to the card issuers ...


5

Depends on what you're looking to achieve. If avoiding fees is the most important thing, you need to do the math and decide what vendor is going to give you the best deal based on your transaction volume. If you need greater programmability, you might consider going to Authorize.Net, but it may cost you more with the gateway fees + merchant account fees.


4

Check out some general marketing data on what people do and don't like to give when purchasing online here. As for my own opinion I think Paypal can deter some purchasers and the % seems to go up as the dollar value of the items go up. I think no matter what site you are and what payment method you use, people leave online shopping carts all the time. It ...


4

Accept donations made with credit cards, debit cards, and PayPal right away. Donors don't need a PayPal account to make their donations. Source: PayPal - Buttons for donations


3

I've never had any problems with it, and I've used it on a few sites before. So I'd say yeah, it's pretty reliable.


3

The cost of Authorize.Net includes a 1 time setup fee ($100), then a $20 a month fee plus an additional $10 monthly for the reoccurring billing plugin. The benefit being it has a fixed cost of $0.10 per transaction. Paypal pro is free to activate plus $20 a month and 2.2-2.9% +$0.30 per transaction. Generally if your around $3,400 or higher in transactions ...


3

I belive Paypal is the cheapest (or almost the cheapest). Along with the cheap fees, PayPal were the 1st (or almost the 1st) to come out on the web as online payment system. IMHO thus PayPal is so widespread! All the other accounts in the answers are almost as simple to use as PayPal. But let's look at FEES Paypal >> 2.9% + $0.30 Google chekout (same ...


3

Here is a link out to PayPal's developer documentation for shopping cart buttons - from the look of it, you will need to create buttons using the client's PayPal account (though it's probably just a matter of finding the right tokens to replace in the HTML forms and links your client's site displays).


3

It starts to make financial sense to leave PayPal when your total sales are over $100 million per year. PayPal now (August 8, 2010) charges the same rates across all accounts. $0.30 per transaction plus 1.9 - 2.9%. The lowest competitive fees I could find at this time is $0.23 per transaction plus 1.5%. If you are averaging ten $50 transactions per day, ...


3

I may be a little old-school here, but PayPal says "amateur" to me. Credible and trustworthy e-commerce sites take real credit cards for payment. Never underestimate the value of trust in e-commerce. Look to Authorize.Net for this, as they are great. See this question for more.


3

I don't think it's a good idea to send them to Amazon as they might find a cheaper merchant or even an item with better comments. Using PayPal for payment and a cart that integrates fully into your website should be preferable in my eyes.


3

This is a rather old question but as I ran into the same issue with a customer today I'd thought I share the solution to this problem for future reference. The solution is to disable the "Transfer Cart Line Items" option for the PayPal payment method you are using. By disabling this, Magento will no longer give details about the totals, tax and shipping to ...


3

As far as Authorize.Net goes, when using ARB (Automated Recurring Billing) you can set a trial period where the cost is different the the regular subscription price. Once the trial period ends the regular subscription price will be charged for the remainder of the subscription. If you want to change the amount charged you will need cancel the current ...


3

The types of payment services you are talking about require the user to make payment on the payment provider's website. When you take control of the payment you lose that because you are now responsible for handling the payment. So there would be no transparent transition for your users if you change processors. Paypal offers an API (I believe it is Website ...


3

There is no such thing as free credit card payments so let's start by ruling that out. (Actually it is possible to get free payment processing from Google Checkout if you are a non-profit and jump through a few hoops but that doesn't apply here and is the exception to the rule). You're going to find that your options are limited and when you do the math ...


3

Going out on a limb without knowing much about your setup. It seems like you're a target because you're not validating any of the billing address credentials. That enables him to verify valid card numbers without having to know much additional information about the card such as billing zip code. It's also possible that your error messages are too verbose ...


3

Yes, there are many alternatives. One such alternative is Stripe, which is geared towards developers and webmasters. Payments for developers Stripe makes it easy to start accepting credit cards on the web today. If you want a solution that includes fraud checks, weekly bank payments, and recurring items, I'd say go with 2Checkout, who let you ...


3

There are a couple of popular WordPress themes with booking systems built in: HotelPress HotelBooking


2

Magento[1] is a very nice all-in-one solution. They have a good solution that's for free and fits the most needs you may have. For "bigger" business use there are really many plugins (like gift coupon, secure payment bridge, and many more). [1] http://magentocommerce.com/


2

You can use paypal subscriptions for this easily. Paypal website payments standard supports this, allowing you to accept visa, mc, paypal, amex as payment methods for your subscribers. You cannot create a stored button for this, becuse the stored buttons are encrypted with a set amount or subscription profile. You create a standard button. Your application ...


2

Danger Will Robinson! If you switch to taking payments directly instead of having someone else manage the payments for you, you may open your website to PCI-DSS compliance requirements. For most small businesses, the slightly higher fees for a service like PayPal are far less expensive than having to meet the PCI-DSS compliance rules. They are complicated ...


2

Avoid storing credit card data if at all possible. There are a whole load of legal issues surrounding it (e.g. there is almost no situation in which you can store the CVV), and you open yourself up to liability if your site ever gets hacked. If you have to go down this route, to start with you should familiarise yourself with PCI DSS, which is the standard ...



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