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12

Shopify is a good shopping cart site. They have a comprehensive list of payment processors, here, that can be used on any site, not just theirs. I think your question is very broad though and I don't know what your goal is. I think you should look into the providers below and which one fits you needs the best. That being said, paypal is one of the best ...


11

These options have been recommended already, but here is my reasoning my I recommend each to my customer: PayPal (or Google Checkout or similar) is great for small websites. It's easy to setup and often they don't have a monthly charge, only a per transaction charge. But it can be confusing for the user as they'll be sent to a website that doesn't look ...


11

Although Darryl has answered your question well I would like to go a bit more in depth here. I've developed a few sites now that use a variety of payment systems. Depending on how many payments you process and how you want to take payments there are a number of options available to you. You may also note that many large sites offer a number of payment ...


10

Here's my take on the issue, although I don't have any firm evidence. I don't think there is actually mistrust with PayPal, but instead confusion as to how PayPal works. Most people don't want to give their credit card number to a company for them to store (although they don't realize this is partially what you're doing with any other company). People may ...


7

Unless you need it for a portfolio item or this website has a clear business plan in a market where you are guaranteed a lot of traffic, don't work for ad space. Unless the other person has a proven track record of revenue producing sites, you're essentially working for free. It's spec work. Some things you need to ask yourself: What is my hourly wage? How ...


7

There is no "standard" as a business can do business any way they want to. But some things to consider are: Use escrow. This ensures both parties are happy with the final result. Have a contract. Make sure everything is spelled out explicitly including the work to be done. This way there is no squabbling over functionality or when the job is officially ...


6

PayPal Payments Standard allows users to pay by card even if they don't have a PayPal account. PayPal Express Checkout requires that users have a PayPal account or create one in order to check out. Both services are detailed on PayPal's merchant page. You should use PayPal Express Checkout if: You already process regular card payments with a form on your ...


6

You're going to get abandoned shopping carts nomatter what you do, but the best option is generally the one that fully integrates into your webpage. You can still use PayPal's API with a roll-your-own (no experience with Amazon and Google as they don't offer services in my part of the world), so you can have the best of both worlds. I doubt there's been ...


5

Depends on what you're looking to achieve. If avoiding fees is the most important thing, you need to do the math and decide what vendor is going to give you the best deal based on your transaction volume. If you need greater programmability, you might consider going to Authorize.Net, but it may cost you more with the gateway fees + merchant account fees.


5

Check out Braintree Payment Solutions. They allow you to integrate the payment form into your own website but handle all of the sensitive data directly so you don't have to deal with PCI-DSS compliance.


5

Strictly speaking, a web developer really isn't qualified to do a lot of what's required to build a website: web design (typography, branding, UX design, IA, etc.) marketing (copywriting, SEO, SEM, etc.) miscellaneous support (hosting, maintenance, employee training, legal, internationalization, etc.) This is one of the reasons why a lot of businesses ...


4

Check out some general marketing data on what people do and don't like to give when purchasing online here. As for my own opinion I think Paypal can deter some purchasers and the % seems to go up as the dollar value of the items go up. I think no matter what site you are and what payment method you use, people leave online shopping carts all the time. It ...


4

Terms of Service, and all copy like it, is the responsibility of the customer unless otherwise specified in a contract. Your job is to build them a shopping cart and ecommerce website, not to be their business decision maker and copyrighter. As far as shopping carts go, keep the following in mind (if anyone has more ideas please feel free to add to this ...


4

See this answer, Which payment provider, such as PayPal, should I use for marketplace style site? for a large list of payment providers found on the web. You want to use one of these payment providers to transfer funds because the software is complex due to required security and the legal requirements that go along with creating a payment site.


3

This may get moved, but I'll take a crack at it as is... Q1: I think you did the right thing. Let them know you don't want to be responsible for creating something of a legal nature b/c it's not your specialty. You could offer links to sites with disclaimers for them to view as examples... Q2: It depends on WHY it's going to take longer.If it's something ...


3

Here's a good chart from a couple of years ago:


3

The types of payment services you are talking about require the user to make payment on the payment provider's website. When you take control of the payment you lose that because you are now responsible for handling the payment. So there would be no transparent transition for your users if you change processors. Paypal offers an API (I believe it is Website ...


3

There is no such thing as free credit card payments so let's start by ruling that out. (Actually it is possible to get free payment processing from Google Checkout if you are a non-profit and jump through a few hoops but that doesn't apply here and is the exception to the rule). You're going to find that your options are limited and when you do the math ...


3

I may be a little old-school here, but PayPal says "amateur" to me. Credible and trustworthy e-commerce sites take real credit cards for payment. Never underestimate the value of trust in e-commerce. Look to Authorize.Net for this, as they are great. See this question for more.


3

It starts to make financial sense to leave PayPal when your total sales are over $100 million per year. PayPal now (August 8, 2010) charges the same rates across all accounts. $0.30 per transaction plus 1.9 - 2.9%. The lowest competitive fees I could find at this time is $0.23 per transaction plus 1.5%. If you are averaging ten $50 transactions per day, ...


3

I don't think it's a good idea to send them to Amazon as they might find a cheaper merchant or even an item with better comments. Using PayPal for payment and a cart that integrates fully into your website should be preferable in my eyes.


3

Organization is something awesome, almost priceless. This is the base not matter if you are a single-man-studio or a studio owner. The problem is most small business, where most freelancers market is, don't want to or can't hire a studio. If you want to be a freelancer, first learn how much time each task takes. Having a schedule is vital. Also, keep in ...


3

The paid memberships pro plugin works well, it supports Stripe, PayPal Website Payments Pro, PayPal Express, or Authorize.net for processing payments.


3

Don't do this on your own financial info storage system as it may burn you. Here are just some of the problems you may encounter: If you collect it online, you will end up storing it online in some format. Your application is not completely secure (none are, so I say that with confidence). Since you are storing the data online, it is accessible via ...


3

Of course people use it. Especially when they want to avoid credit card interest, paypal fees and stuff. Paypal and credit card transaction companies also hold a rolling reserve on your money and so you can't actually withdraw the funds until X amount time. They do that to lower the risk of charge backs and disputes. And why do you say there are high fees? ...


3

Yes, there are many alternatives. One such alternative is Stripe, which is geared towards developers and webmasters. Payments for developers Stripe makes it easy to start accepting credit cards on the web today. If you want a solution that includes fraud checks, weekly bank payments, and recurring items, I'd say go with 2Checkout, who let you ...


2

Disclosure: I work at Braintree. Braintree has all of the advantages you list for Bango, and more. You don't need to include full customer details. In fact, you can charge a card with just a credit card number and expiration date -- though you'll get less declines if you include the zip code (for U.S. cards) and CVV. Credit card details can be stored by ...


2

On your mywebsite.com/donate page, you will need to construct a form and then automatically submit it using JavaScript. A basic example: <form id="my_form" action="http://paypal.com" method="post"> <input type="hidden" name="name" value="Example"> <input type="hidden" name="email" value="test@test.com"> <input type="hidden" ...


2

You need Paypal Adaptive Payments Adaptive Payments offers a number of features, including: Pay anyone with an email address. Make payments to another person as long as they have an email address or mobile phone number, with or without a PayPal account. Recipients without a PayPal account can create one in minutes. Receive payments ...


2

Accepting payments from Africa is very high risk due to the amount of fraud originating from there. I'd be surprised if you found a provider that allowed you to accept payments from there and had fees anywhere near what Paypal offers.



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