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6

One reason for having this as a goal during initial development is that it forces you to think critically about your web site's link structure from the outset. If the hierarchy is clear in the URL, then this clarity will naturally flow into the structure of the website and ease navigation for both your users and the search engines. Depending on how you are ...


6

One of the primary reasons is for end-user readability. A slashed/re-written url is significantly easier to read and type than a long string of queries attached onto the end of a base url


5

If you make the styleshhet path relative to the rooot directory of the site I would think it would work in both cases, i.e. <link rel='stylesheet' href='/stylesheets/style.css'/>


5

No, it shouldn't matter if you have thousands of pages at the same "level". I've seen sites that have all their content at the root level because they are under the impression it makes a big difference for SEO. (Incidentally the sites do rank well but I don't think the lack of organization has any bearing on that.) I think the structure you are proposing is ...


3

The short answer is "it depends", mostly on what you're going to do with it. Looking at the spec for RFC3987 Internationalized Resource Identifiers, IE is well within it's rights to encode your URLs, especially if you've got a US/UK keyboard assigned where entering an é might not be the simplest of actions for the user... On top of that, I've seen servers ...


3

Some people claim that it has a positive SEO effect. By including keywords that people will search for within the URL, your search engine rankings can be higher. Other reasons include a neat URL structure and URL "guessability" through removal of URL path components to get to higher levels of navigation. If you are using an MVC framework of any kind, you ...


2

You mean: site.com/Teams/Arsenal instead of site.com?team=arsenal Will other than the fact they will be implemented differently the former is both cleaner and also hackable. So if you remove 'Arsenal' it could display a list of teams.


2

A more discript Uri is probably better, provided its not unnecessairly long. Something to take into account, in the example you provide you have tires within spare parts, what about new tires where do they go? What if in the future you start selling bike tires? I would probably do something like this to maximize data available: ...


2

URLs are URLs - it doesn't really matter how they're structured for search engines. The main element I would recommend working on is to make sure that your images (and the pages they're on) are as much as possible on a single URL, so that you don't have /gallery1/image124 and /gallery3/image124 with the same image on them. Depending on how you build your ...


2

It's better to link to the folder If sometimes you link to www.example.com/site/index.html and other times to www.example.com/site/ you will end up with a spitted pagerank If you link to a page instead of a folder It's harder to remember. (was it www.example.com/contact or www.example.com/contactUs.html?) It looks ugly as hell You are exposing the ...


2

You can allow any character in URLs but it is not a good idea. for example %2F is the "percent-encoded" version of "/" that is a special character the common practice is use the UTF-8 encoding for the URLs, because it is Unicode based and it is backward compatible with ASCII (basic US characters) as I said it is not a good idea allowing all characters. ...


1

www.example.com/site/index.html and www.example.com/site/ Pointing to the bare directory, without the directory index, is prefered. Although the same content might be displayed on your server, these are different URLs. Search engines will see these two URLs as different and might perceive this as duplicate content if both these URLs are used on your ...


1

If you are using the ISO-8859-1 character set, then you can use the following table for reference. You just simply use Entity Name or Entity Number. HTML ISO-8859-1 EDIT: just re-read your question, am not sure how you can 'convert' the characters directly from your DB to allow browsers to read it correctly. According to rfc1738 (page 2), unsafe ...


1

Search engines can index query string URLs (?page=toys) but it is better to make them appear as directory/page. It makes them easier to read. .htaccess files can help with URL rewriting. rewrite query strings in urls AND rewrite query string with htaccess .htaccess files can also remove the index.php from your URLs. I recommend both of these actions.


1

The main reason I do it is for readability, specifically on search results. I've only heard this and don't have any hard numbers, but it's supposed to increase click through. In other words if you have 2 results with the exact same ranking, people are more likely to click on the clean and easy to read one. I don't think this always needs to be one with ...



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